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Instrument Survey


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A special thanks to those who provided the serial numbers of their Lachenal concertinas.

 

Serial numbers/descriptions from other Lachenal owners would be much appreciated.

 

Now, it is time to make my contribution to the survey;

 

Lachenal #140871: 32-key Anglo C/G with bird whistle and cock crow; metal ends (ME); bone buttons (BB); the Oct. 1895 sales receipt indicates that it was purchased with an extra set of reed shoes with brass reeds (BR). It now has steel reeds (SR) except for a few high notes from the BR set. The extra reed shoes are long gone.

 

Lachenal #106712: 30-key Anglo C/G piccolo (one octave above standard); WE; BB; SR. My wife loves this concertina, because it is so low volume.

 

Jeffries 31-key (with drone) Anglo C/G; ME; BB; SR; pre-1906

 

Jeffries 26-key Anglo G/D (probably Ab/Eb orginally); wood end; BB; SR; early, but in excellent conditon

 

Jeffries 26-key Anglo C/G; ME; BB; SR; pre-1906

 

I may write a short piece, "In Defense of the 26-key Anglo Concertina." (Obviously, I like 'em.)

 

One-row (i.e, 10-key) German-Anglo (c. 1850). If a reader is a German-Anglo history buff: it was probably built by C. Pirner (Saxony), C. Uhlig (Saxony), or C. Zimmermann (Saxony; later moved to Philadelphia and patented the autoharp). Wood ends, levers, and buttons (bone capped). The reed plates are similar to those in a harmonica.

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1 Off: 36 key Jeffries Anglo in G/C (apparently actually built by Crabb).

 

1 Off: 20 Key lachenal 'clone' in G/C suffering from being up the attic for years, but about to be restored to playing condition for the kids to use.

Whoops, I somehow managed to post that before I meant to!, but I've now forgotten what I was about to say anyway!

 

Clive.

 

PS what is 'Flood control'?

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Hello all, My name is Allen Watsky and I play English Concertina. As it happens I own"and" play two Edeophone concertinas a treble and a tenor treble. I play my Ten/Treb more than the Treble 'cause the TT has a low D. Its an ethnic 'ting. Best to all. from yerpalal

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I have a mid-range Lachenal English (circa 1900) with steel reeds, five-fold bellows, and metal buttons; a twelve-sided original Crabb English (1968); and a 1930 Wheatstone Amboyna Aeola with 50 buttons. The Lachenal and Crabb were purchased from Paul Groff and the Wheatstone from the Button Box. Take care, John Gunnell

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DB, I was OOT for a few weeks. Got back and the world had changed. Took a while to adapt. Regretably won't be at the NESI this year. I have a couple of gigs right in the middle of the festa. Next year, at Bucksteep! I wanted to share a Doina on Saturday. Next time, *and* I'll have another year to PRACTICE ! AW

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I have a 1904 Wheatstone English (56 button-extended treble)=It was restored by Dipper about 1 year ago. and a Herrington Anglo (30-button:C/G)---I ordered a Dipper Anglo almost 3 yrs ago--Hopefully it will come one day before I die!!??!!--Steven--

Edited by Steven Hollander
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has anyone thought that advertising the ownership of multiple expensive instruments is not the best home security policy?

Well, being in America, I suppose I should also in fairness point out that I also own a number of firearms... (*)

 

(Grin)

 

--Dave

 

 

(*) Of course, that in itself also makes you a potential target for theft, they just have to make sure no one is home...

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has anyone thought that advertising the ownership of multiple expensive instruments is not the best home security policy?

Well, being in America, I suppose I should also in fairness point out that I also own a number of firearms... (*)

 

(Grin)

 

--Dave

 

 

(*) Of course, that in itself also makes you a potential target for theft, they just have to make sure no one is home...

:)

Ah, the difference is between expensive and valuable. To most reading this forum a musical instrument that is one is expected to be the other.

 

To the typical thief deciding what to carry off, these two qualities may not be the same. A computer may be less expensive than a metal ended Jeffries, but to a thief, a more valuable thing to steal. Many years ago a friend of mine came back to his apartment to find it broken into. On the bed he found his mandolin case open, but the LL F4 Gibson still in it! Missing was some clothing, a clock radio and 3 quart jars of pennys and nickles - at most $50. If one person can only carry so much, why not take the money? Try running with 3 quarts of coins, and you will see why one might leave some weird looking tiny guitar for the next guy.

 

As for the atypical thief, if one understands the value of a quality instrument, hanging around sessions is the best way to identify who has what available for taking locally. And as far as that goes, concertinas are cheap compared to other instruments; so probably not worth the bother unless a surprise opportunity presents itself.

 

Finally, if there any readers of this forum planning a career of stealing expensive concertinas from owners around the world, be aware that the big money in this occupation is most likely from selling the movie rights for use as a slapstick comedy after you are caught at home in a room that looks like Chris Algar's web site picture.

 

Again, most emphatically :)

 

Dan Madden

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Lachenal English No 1169.wooden ends green bellowsgold embossing also on finger strap brass inlayof a rose with scolls either side6 on each side in the corners,steel reeds.

 

Lachenal Anglo No132397 Bb/F metal ended ,steel reeds,Strange fingering 17 buttons and Bb drone on the left side 14 buttons and air button on the right,the buttons on the left are top row 5 middle 6 bottom 6 the rows on the right side are 3 top row 5 middle and 6 on the bottom row also the end cover underneath the metal end is thinner than the righr side it was also in a strange tuning I have the notes of the old tuning if you want the them.There was a peice of newspaper inside which Andrew Norman fished out when he was repairing it which had a date of 1890s on it which makes it earlier than the date by numbering system

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