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  1. Yesterday
  2. Well, I like my hand straps pretty snug. I have friends who's straps are looser, but they have to brace their hands with their pinky fingers and I need my pinkies available --- especially on the left for that f#. They aren't so tight that they restrict my range of motion, and I'll be honest, I'm not at the point where I'm using many of the buttons on the third row or on the very low or very high end, but when I do, it seems to work okay. When I say snug, I mean I used a nail set to punch another two holes in the wrist straps that came with the Morse. Also, my hands are smallish. Can anyone think of any reason why snug straps are not a great idea over the long term? Christine
  3. Isel

    Purchasing A New Stagi Hayden In Europe

    😕 It sounds to me... The 4 weeks the dealer promised to me resulted in around 8-9 at final... I hope you will receive the Stagi soon!!. After that I think It would needed a checking by an accordion technician... I enjoy the Stagi very much!. Honestly, It seems to me the Stagi could be a better instrument with no too difficult changes in its construction. I can try to play more things that I previosly imagined. The major defaut IMO is I thing it is a litle bit awkward, because I feel both the buttons and bellows are a bit hard to play. I feel my arms getting tired after not so much time playing.
  4. lachenal74693

    Hornpipe and polka rhythms?

    I had a quick look. Interesting indeed. There is a pointer to what looks like an interesting article at: http://www.academia.edu/1492605/The_triple_Time_Hornpipe. I also found the following in the catalogue of the Henry Watson Music Library (I assume this is the library mentioned, I also assume it's the same 'Walsh'): A bibliography of the musical works published by John Walsh during the years 1695-1720 A bibliography of the musical works published by the firm of John Walsh during the years 1721-1766 I couldn't find the actual tune book in the catalogue, but I must try and suss it out next time I'm in. It may be in the Reference section two floors further up, or in the rare books stack. The staff in this library are always helpful, so if they have it, they'll find it for me. They let me transcribe ''The Manchester Ship Canal Waltz' from the original sheet music a few months ago (don't ask - I did it for a very laboured 'joke', the tune itself is 'orrible). Manchester Central Library is one of the world's great libraries! They have three pianos and a drum-kit in the music library, and a table football game in the Business Library... Roger
  5. wunks

    Hornpipe and polka rhythms?

    In a thread "History of Hornpipes", from The Session forum, Ronald Ellison mentions Walsh's Tunes Book of 1730 from the Manchester Music Library. He says it contains 25 Hornpipes in 3/2 but doesn't say if there are any in other time signatures. The whole thread is an interesting read.
  6. adrian brown

    Hornpipe and polka rhythms?

    It seems like the term 'hornpipe' has meant different things to various different traditions over the last 500 odd years. However it is a much older dance term than the polka and seems to have always been associated with the British Isles. The triple-time hornpipe is probably oldest and in this great article, John Ward makes a distinction between the traditional “Lancashire” hornpipe and the “Dancing Master” hornpipes, so popular in the early 18th century. How this “tradition” morphed into the duple version is probably something that needs studying - are there any collections that include duple-time hornpipes before the 19th century? (The Clare manuscript must be the oldest collection that comes to my mind.) Adrian
  7. English Concertina, 48 key, concert pitch, brass reeds, wooden ends, bone buttons. Made by Lachenal approx 1880. Recently serviced with some replacement reeds and springs together with all new pads and valves. Ideal beginner's instrument. £500. Selling on behalf of a bereaved neighbour. Located near Peterborough, UK. For further information email mark@swingler.me.uk, Skype mswingler, leave a voice message on 01733 252067 or text on 07794579762
  8. Scott N

    Wanted: Used Morse Anglo. Hoping to buy one.

    Hi David, I have a 3 year old Jeffries configuration CG with the rosewood finish that's in perfect condition that I'm looking to get $2300 for. Scott
  9. Toonladder

    Purchasing A New Stagi Hayden In Europe

    Hello, at the moment I also have delivery problems with Stagi, Italy. Delivery time would be 4 weeks or less. I prepaid the full amount and have been waiting for 8 weeks now and they just do not answer my mails. I am getting a little worried.....
  10. lachenal74693

    New British £50 note.

    Now, that is damn' interesting. Do you by any chance know of a reference where this idea is explained in more detail? It's about time I brushed up the Physics I did 40+ years ago, and that sounds like as good a place as any to start... Ta. Roger
  11. Geoff Wooff

    Hornpipe and polka rhythms?

    To Clarify what Peter is refering to here are 'Sets' of Quadrilles . There are several ' Figures' or sections for these dances and musicians use Jigs ,Reels and Hornpipes etc. , as apropriate, for each figure.
  12. Wolf Molkentin

    Hornpipe and polka rhythms?

    Peter, I understand "here" is referring to Ireland. Would you say there's a common way of playing hornpipes in Ireland, and if so, do they in any case get a dotted playing? Best wishes - 🐺
  13. Peter Laban

    Hornpipe and polka rhythms?

    Hornpipes are widely used for certain figures of the sets around here, not just for solo dancing. And as such they're widely and commonly danced.
  14. wunks

    Hornpipe and polka rhythms?

    People dance to these tunes, yes, but I don't see them dancing the "hornpipe" except in an exhibition setting, which was my meaning. Sorry to confuse. The hornpipe dance in the examples I've seen is a singleton dance with lots of hops and leg kicks.
  15. Peter Laban

    Hornpipe and polka rhythms?

    In the context of the music I play, Irish music, I feel that generally speaking hornpipes are different in structure from reels and they don't loose that structure when you try make them sound like reels. Surely, there are grey areas and there are tunes that have a structure that makes them more malleable, there are quite a few tunes floating about that were initially flings that have transmogrified into both reel and hornpipe for example and the odd one, like the Scholar, has made a widely accepted switch to another form but in general, I don't see tunes working both as a reel and hornpipe by modifying their rhythms and speed a bit.
  16. DickT

    Hornpipe and polka rhythms?

    Try The Steamboat as reel, it goes very well.
  17. I tune reeds in the reed pan placed on top of my tuning bellows, which is mainly designed for tuning accordion reed blocks. So the reeds are "at home". I still need to do offset tuning too, so I think it's unavoidable.
  18. Peter Laban

    Hornpipe and polka rhythms?

    That quite the statement. I suppose it depends where you look. I see people dance to these tunes in a social context regularly. I never understand people who say that. The two forms are different. Surely you can impose a 'hornpipe rhythm' on a reel or speed up and flatten the rhythmic shape of a hornpipe and ignore the internal rhythms built into the melody but the form of the tune is such that it more often than not sounds forced and just plain wrong.
  19. lachenal74693

    Hornpipe and polka rhythms?

    Ah! As a musical numptie, I had 'empirically' stumbled across that idea myself without any 'outside assistance'. It's comforting to know it's a valid approach. Ta. That answers my initial point, and makes it much clearer, as far as categorising (and playing) these 3/2 tunes is concerned. It doesn't get much better than a response from the man who did the transcription - it's got to be correct - ta! Thank you. Roger.
  20. Doug Barr

    Jeffries Bros 31 button C/G for sale

    Hi Allison, Sent you a private message. Doug Barr
  21. Wolf Molkentin

    my first Anglo recording :)

    Hi @Paul_Hardy - here's my demo recording with my model 24 treble EC (in Cmaj for closer comparability, contrary to my former declaration after having tried the tunes on the TT). What do you say? I like the Anglo recording better (no surprise, with tunes like these in mind I tried the new-for-me system). Thank you once again for your attention. Best wishes - 🐺
  22. Last week
  23. LateToTheGame

    Colin Dipper Pride of Albion Anglo

    Make sure both you and your buyers do homework regarding their country's systems on Cites II restrictions for exporting and importing woods if you are selling outside your home country. Rosewood is currently on the restricted list, though they are talking about changing that for musical instruments in 2019. It would be a shame to have this purchased only to be destroyed at customs. Antique instruments are exempt, but not used ones. I think antiques are more than 40 years old, but I can't remember now. I would check with your country's agency for specifics. In the US the agency in charge of this is U.S. Fish and Wildlife. The agency will vary country to country. There was a used Cocobo flute shipped from the US to the UK early this year. The seller did not realize Cocobo was on the restricted list and the instrument was confiscated, gone for ever. I was told by U.S. Fish and Wildlife's Chicago office over a year ago that an instrument sold became a commercial transaction as of the date of the sale, whether it was made pre-cites II or not. This was right after the law came into effect and interpretations may have changed. You will likely need an import and export permit for the wood for both the shipper and receiver. There is a lot of info on this on the Chiff and Fipple Flute forum as blackwood was also restricted. Flutemakers have a lot more paperwork to do making sure they have a paper trail that the wood they use was sustainably harvested. As I said, they are reviewing these rules (at the Hague?) with the idea they may exclude musical instruments next year. As it currently reads you can travel with your personal instrument containing up to 15 kilos of restricted wood. So would you be skirting the rules if you took a trip and brought it home? I don't know and I'd hate to find out by seeing my Dipper walk down the hall under a customs person's arm never to be seen again. At least one Canadian lost his personal hybrid after a gathering in the US because the Canadian Customs agent thought it looked "too new". It was assumed he was trying to get around the rules. So people are encouraged to travel with their old reciepts if they have them. Again, if the powers that be make the exception for instruments this may no longer be a problem in a year or two. These rules are taken very seriously. I recently had a new Dipper shipped to the US. It spend a couple of days in "Homeland Security" where it was opened and viewed. In my case the woods were all Cites II compliant and clearly listed on the customs declaration. Chris Algar may have some info on this.
  24. MelBoy

    Colin Dipper Pride of Albion Anglo

    Hi Ken, yes, it is indeed a CG!! How could I miss that out?! cheers Mike
  25. I have chambers on my tuning device but they do not create a situation similar to being in the instrument. I still need to do offset tuning.
  26. Paul_Hardy

    Hornpipe and polka rhythms?

    I don't disagree with what is said in the trail above. Just to clarify my position about tunes in my tunebook: I use the rhythm designation Hornpipe for tunes in 4/4 time, that I feel should be swung - lengthening the first and shortening the second of each pair of quavers (eight notes) to sound like Thursday. . Often these have 'Hornpipe' in their title, but by no means all. Many I first encountered, written out as 'dotted quaver, semi-quaver' pairs, but that makes the first note three times as long as the second in each pair, which I feel is too much. When playing I go for about a 60/40 or 70/30 split. It's one of the weaknesses of classical music notation that there isn't a simple way to express that. Most reels can be played as hornpipes, and vice-versa. The other tunes which are in 3/2, and often with Hornpipe in their title, I annotate the rhythm as 'Triple Hornpipe', and these are not swung (much). Instead, the tunes often use the ambiguity of having six crotchets in the bar, to shift between three strong beats, to having two triplets. Many of these tunes went out of fashion but have regained interest recently. Remember, Hornpipe originally meant any tune played on an instrument made of horn!
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