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inventor

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About inventor

  • Rank
    Chatty concertinist

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    Folk Music, and Baroque Music. Developing keyboards for Concertinas and Melodeons that enable ordinary folk, who (like myself) are not virtuosos; to play easily in a multitude of different keys on the same instrument.
  • Location
    South-west of England

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  1. I have seen the insides of many melodeons and accordions over the years, and have noticed that the reed plates for the very highest notes, have three factors that differ from the lower reed plates. 1) They are valveless; like yours. 2) The reed plates are are reversed, so that the tongue tip is closer to the opening. 3) The tone chamber has a wedge shaped insert in it to reduce it's volume. On the prototype Russian Hayden System Concertina, where all the reeds of each side were on a single plate; one pair of reeds on the left hand side was accidentally put on the wr
  2. Congratulations John; I am so pleased to hear this good news. Brian Hayden.
  3. I fully endorse the recommendation of Rosalie Dipper's Bellows. Any size, any shape - Hexagonal, extended Hexagonal, Octagonal, Decagonal, or Duo-decagonal. She specializes in bellows making, and is the most experienced concertina bellows maker in the world. I am lucky to live only about a 20 minute drive from the Dipper workshops. On one occasion when I had to have a small repair to my concertina; I went there for it to be done. We went to the top floor in the mansard loft of a good sized Georgian house where Colin examined my concertina and disappeared with it to another worksho
  4. Reminds me of the "Bellamoid clip" that Peter Bellamy used to have on his Anglo concertina to hold down a unisonoric drone note. Inventor.
  5. I have nothing to add to everything that I wrote 18 years ago, (see link above). The advantages of Hayden specification over the "parallel" arrangement becomes more apparent, when playing more complex music, on the larger instruments. I must say that I have never seen any reason why makers could not make the fretting of the ends in such a way that the handles could be fixed in several different ways. Wheatstone made Duet Concertinas with the uncut part of the fretting below the handles in an "infinity" pattern. This would allow the handles to be attached in an infinite number of d
  6. I see that there's one in the Akkordeon Museum https://akkordeon-museum.ch/ Opening page shows one center stage in the first photograph. I can't find more details about it , but my German is not very good, so maybe I have missed the full details. Inventor
  7. There is one in the Horniman Museum, Forest Hill, London. It is now fully restored. However when I first visited the Horniman in the 1950s, many of the musical instruments were in a very sorry state, owing to neglect during the war. The Melophone was was totally fallen apart in it's case, and you could see all the internal mechanism with wires connecting from the buttons to little trap doors. This was much more interesting to me, as I have always been fascinated by how musical instruments work. Inventor.
  8. Thank-you David. It's always nice to hear from someone who enjoys my little idea. Best wishes, Brian.
  9. This is not a Jeffries instrument, but a modern Hayden Duet instrument made specially for myself by a modern maker. Inventor.
  10. Regarding bisonoric buttons I had confused myself into thinking that you also intended to add "Midi" to the concertina. However I see that Midi was only required in the thread that Don Taylor referred back to. I still would not advise them on a Duet concertina. I have a couple at the top end of my large (69 button) concertina, and often play them in the wrong direction ! Inventor.
  11. Quick answer to Isel's 51st button question - "none of these" ! Once you go beyond 46 buttons, I would put the priority on adding the Key of Bb to the easy-peasy options. Certainly players of traditional dance music in New England U.S.A. think so. This is the thinking behind both the Beaumont and Peacock. There might be different priorities in Spain ? For the 4 buttons to make 50, I would go for adding a low Bb & eb to the left hand side and the corresponding bb and eb' at the bottom left hand corner of the right side. These to be added into the center of the reed-pan of an e
  12. P.S. I can see a way of upping the reed count to 51 buttons for a Hayden Duet in a 6.25 Hexagon, without compromising the reed scale of the lower pitch reeds. This would not easy but it would be just possible, and might mean leaving out an air button. As mentioned you just need to play a note to evacuate the air before putting the concertina away in it's case, and I have heard this done by many English concertina players over the years. Inventor.
  13. The Wheatstone standard 46 button Hayden Duet (21 L & 25 R) is a 6.25 " Hexagon. The reeds are set out radially as are almost all Wheatstone concertinas. I personally have never ever needed an air button whilst playing, and have only ever used an air button before starting or after finishing. The 46 button Wheatstone has an air button incorporated into the front of the right hand, hand rest, which was specially designed by Steve Dickinson, and which opens onto the round hole in the center of the reed-pan. Inventor.
  14. There is one factor about the construction of the Bandoneon which alters the timbre. This is placing the reeds on continuous rather than individual reed plates. Russian "Bayan" accordions are also constructed in this way which gives the timbre that Russians favor. I suggest you find someone who plays a Russian Bayan and see if this is what you are looking for. I once had a concertina made in Moscow by a bayan accordion maker which had all the reeds of each side on a single plate. This instrument had a timbre much closer to the sound of a traditional concertina than a hybrid accordi
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