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Bill N

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About Bill N

  • Birthday 01/10/1959

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    Hamilton, Canada

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  1. "Tell me how pitch can be lowered by simply removing material from a reed?" You can lower the pitch by removing a bit of material from the base (clamped end) of the reed.
  2. Maybe not useful advice for your beginner phase, but a few of the modern top-end makers do offer adjustable hand rests. Carroll concertinas uses a system that lets you move the rest forward and back, and vary the angle relative to the button rows. Kensington offers different sizes of ergonomically shaped (and very beautiful) hand rests that can be easily swapped. There may be some others that I haven't encountered.
  3. Maybe a weak spring is letting the pad lift on the push?
  4. Good advice from Rod and David. I would add one tip. My secret weapon is to use a damp, 100% woolen sock, rather than the cloth Rod mentions. It does a great job of smoothing, pressing, and removing excess glue without "catching" the leather and shifting it the way a regular cloth sometimes does.
  5. "This was my first non-hybrid concertina..." I don't want to stomp on your thread, but your Herrington is indeed a hybrid (although a very high-quality one). It uses superior accordion style reeds rather than individual, traditional concertina reeds. Still, a very nice instrument and a very fair price.
  6. Sorry for the thread drift, but what is that tune? (lovely playing, and Bb/F is my favourite tuning)
  7. Those are typical issues for that style of action. The other typical failure (which might be related to the grinding and metal shavings): The brown rubber sleeves in your 3rd photo dry out and lose their "spring" and no longer do a good job keeping the buttons tightly in place. The buttons can wobble around, and the slotted shaft can move too much on the lever arm, thereby causing undo wear. An easy upgrade is to replace them with short lengths of silicone tubing (I've used model aircraft fuel line). There are some good threads on that topic here.
  8. If there are any screws (usually only 2) you''d be able to feel them through the fabric. They're usually just driven into the frame at an angle, so they will definitely be easy to feel. I've had luck using the perpendicular reed block as a "handle" to gently but firmly rock/wiggle and pull at the same time.
  9. Sometimes there are a couple of little wood screws right at the edge of the reed board. Maybe hiding under the fabric of the seal? If not, it's probably just a friction fit, and some firm wiggling and tugging should pull it out.
  10. There haven't been a lot of similar sales here to base it on, but that would be the optimistic end of the range I think. 5 or 6 years ago a similar instrument went begging for a buyer at 2000 pounds.
  11. According to an info sheet prepared by Geoff Crabb this concertina would be a little older than the 1950s. See quote below: "On metal ended instruments made for direct sale, a cartouche was included in the right hand fretwork for the name stamp: J Crabb till approx.1908, then H. Crabb till approx. 1926, then H Crabb & Son to closure (1989)."
  12. Odd that there are no photos of the ends. Pretty curt description as well.
  13. I wondered about that. I was under the impression that the "English" (i.e. not German) instruments there were all Wheatstones, but found an earlier thread here that talks about Lachenals pre-1900. Those bellows look like original factory equipment- was Lachenal doing this sort of custom/export work? Had the Boer style of playing evolved to the degree that there would have been a market for extended bellows?
  14. This is currently listed on a local on-line auction. The only description is "Civil War era Squeeze Box". Maybe a bodged Lachenal? But 11 fold bellows?
  15. I have just corrected an error in the original listing. This is of course a Treble, not a Tenor instrument. Can you tell I'm a non-music reading Anglo player? My apologies.
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