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  1. Yesterday
  2. Chris Ghent

    New reeds

    Don’t give up on the reeds; clean them and de-rust them.
  3. Irish Newbie

    Rushworth and Dreaper

    Not sure what would make it a better Lachenal??? I take it that they would not all be of the same quality? Thanks again Wolf!
  4. Irish Newbie

    Rushworth and Dreaper

    Ross, Thanks for your reply. It does indeed have an engraved plate with their address on it. Any info I could get said that they were instrument makers and I just assumed that it was theirs.
  5. Irish Newbie

    New reeds

    Thanks for your reply Ted, I appreciate your help. I'm not sure what condition the reeds are in, but judging by the state of the rest of the instrument I'd just assume they won't work. I also thought the reeds would be the most difficult part of the repair and therefore the most expensive. If I could gauge the price of the reeds I think it would go a long way to determine whether or not it's worth it to proceed.
  6. Daniel Hersh

    Current makes of concertina

    Added Blackthorn in the Intermediate/mid-range category.
  7. Daniel Hersh

    Anglo-German, but different

    Thanks for posting - I haven't seen quite one quite like this before. I'm curious about the dimensions. I'd guess it's basically a six-sided German-made bandonion.
  8. Wolf Molkentin

    Beginners and Improvers on Anglo Concertina

    just to keep you updated:
  9. Bob Tedrow

    Homewood Music gallery of available concertinas

    Doug, pm sent bob
  10. Tradewinds Ted

    Starting again

    I don't play crane, but from piano a nice and fairly simple variation on the "oom-pah" portion of your accompaniment is to include some simple chord inversions if the same chord is required for a full bar or more. Not meaning to make it too complicated, just something to consider. So you might play the root of the chord on the first beat, and then 3rd and 5th together on the second beat, just as you have been doing. Then if the required chord hasn't changed yet play the 5th of the chord (perhaps in a lower octave than just played?) on the third beat, followed by the root and 5th on the fourth beat. Or mix it up and sometimes play the 3rd, followed by the root and 5th. The variation can be more interesting to listen to, and since the 5th of one chord will usually be the same as the root of one of the other two most common chords, it adds just a tiny pleasant bit of unconscious tension for the briefest moment while waiting for the upbeat to hear if the chord has actually changed or not.
  11. doodle

    Jeffries reed swap

    Many thanks, Both. I know your joint knowledge is based on massive experience, so I'm happy to leave this thread at this point and put the idea aside as impractical for me to take forward. Thanks for taking the time to respond, it was a thought I had for a future plan which I'm content to forget. Regards, Tony
  12. Paul_Hardy

    English concertina tuition needed

    Alex Wade is an excellent teacher and English concertina player, and is I think still in your neck of the woods - see https://alexwadeconcertina.com/. If she can't help you herself, she would know the other players in the area.
  13. Frank Edgley

    Jeffries reed swap

    Just as Wolf says...doable but not as easy as you describe.
  14. frogspawn

    Starting again

    The first thing I'm trying is an accompaniment on the left. I'm hitting the root note of the chord on the first and third beats and then the 3rd and 5th notes of the chord together on the second and fourth beats. It's like an oom-pah but doesn't use bass notes. The song I'm working on is in C, so for the C chord I'm alternating C4 with E4+G4. Following the way mandolin chords are described but starting at the bottom end of the keyboard, I notate this chord shape as X443X or 443 if not using the outside columns. To keep things simple I use the same shape for F (554) and G (332). For melodic breaks I'm droning power chords on the left, i.e. X43, X54 and X32 for C5, F5 and G5 respectively, while playing the melody on the right in the upper octave. This is all very straightforward and seems to produce an acceptable sound. Rik
  15. Peter Laban

    Earlier today, out West

    For anyone into that sort of thing: the whole lunchtime recital mentioned above has been put on youtube (not by me). Slightly shaky mobile phone footage but ten tracks or so in all.
  16. Tradewinds Ted

    New reeds

    You mention several other items that need repair, but not the reeds? I suppose the need to replace the reeds was implied by the original question, but what is their condition? Missing, broken, rusty, dirty, or just out of tune? I've not heard of anyone making traditional concertina reeds in shoes, except those builders who also manufacture their own concertinas. The concertina reeds are considered to be a significant portion of the total cost of the instrument. If you do find a source of reeds, make certain that they will fit your particular instrument. The reeds and shoes for each particular note are not all identical in size and configuration from one maker to another. I understand being intrigued by a particular instrument though, and it could be an interesting project. But if your reservation about a professional restoration is the cost, I expect that your best course of action would be to have a professional restorer take a look at the instrument, to see what is really involved to either just bring it to playable condition, or to fully restore it, and discuss what each option actually would cost, as well as what portions of that project are advisable for you to take on yourself, either for you to learn or save on the overall cost. You may indeed be advised that the instrument is a lost cause and not worth the expense, but you may find it will cost less than you fear, and in either case you should get some advice that aids your efforts or even prevents accidental damage from an ill-advised action. I'm nothing like an expert though, just interested. There are others who can much better advise you, including previous responders in this thread!
  17. Wolf Molkentin

    Anglo-German, but different

    indeed, John - and there's already a bidding war going on... 🙄
  18. What do you folks think of this eBay item? The visible hardware - air lever and air grille - are definitely German. In fact the grille looks identical to the one on my small, single-voiced Bandoneon dating from around 1900. The button arrangement also looks very similar (though not identical) to my Bandoneon's; however the hexagonal shape and the foliate fretwork look more English. I'd love to see a pic of the innards of it. The positioning of the fretwork makes me think of the German-style, parallel lever arrangement. I would assume it has traditional German reeds mounted 10 to a plate, but it would be nice to know whether they're mounted on the back of the action-board or in reed-banks, and whether they're single- or double-voiced. I don't know if you'd call it pretty - but it certainls looks interesting! Cheers, John
  19. DickT

    New Model 48 key Treble

    Hi Everyone, I have a Lachenal ebony-ended New Model Treble for sale. It was bought about seven years ago from David Robertson after tuning and a full overhaul and and has been little used since then. The tone is mellow, well suited to singing and though the action is fast enough for quick tunes it would not hold its own in a loud session. It is in very tidy condition with steel reeds, 5 fold bellows, concert pitch and original leather case. I am selling as it has been superseded by an Edeophone and an Aeola TT. If you are near Aberdeen (Scotland) feel free to come and try. £1550 plus shipping. Dick.
  20. Wolf Molkentin

    Jeffries reed swap

    In my experience there is no such thing like a "standard-sized" slot - they're all rooted and fitted individually, and hence a swap would often require some removal of wood or shimming with a piece of paper. OTOH there are dimensions spanning not just one single note, but I would expect that at a certain point in a scale the lower-pitched instrument would have a larger reed shoe... Can't really be answered in general I reckon - apart from: 1. it could be done, 2. it might not be perfectly simple (and reversible) all over... Best wishes - 🐺
  21. Can anyone tell me if it is a simple swop to change the reeds of a 38 key C/G Jeffries and put them into a 38 key Bb/F Jeffries and vice-versa? In other words, are the slots for the reed shoes pretty much 'standard' between similar instruments in similar button positions - I'm not currently in a position to check sizes, so this is just a general query in principal. I'm guessing that slots are not so specific as to make this impossible. Any thoughts, please? Regards, Tony.
  22. Irish Newbie

    New reeds

    I have an old concertina that by the looks of it most would throw it away. Buttons missing, strap damaged, bellows worn, but there is something that intrigues me about it and I'd love to restore it. I just think that sending it to a professional who could restore it properly would be prohibitively expensive.
  23. Theo

    New reeds

    I just wonder why you would want a new set of reeds. Are you thinking of building a concertina?
  24. Dana Johnson

    Strengthening Push and Pull Muscles

    Greg has really good advice re exercising. One quirk of concertina playing is that most people hold one end fixed when seated and move the other. This means that one arm is basically doing isometric exercise while the other is dynamic exercise. It is a good idea to intersperse some moving exercise for the static arm with your playing practice. Otherwise, you will develop strength but not range of motion that can cause trouble, especially in the neck and shoulder since any force you apply has to be countered by an opposite force on the other end of the muscle attachments. Playing concertina can be enjoyable enough not to want to stop. Then all of a sudden it starts to be painful and requires a long break to get back to where it is safe to play again. Dana
  25. RP3

    Rushworth and Dreaper

    I am pretty sure that Rushworth & Dreaper was a retailer of concertinas. For a number of years, I owned a nice concertina bought from Paul Groff that had a brass plate engraved with the “Rushworth & Dreaper” name and the address “Islington”. The instrument was identified as a Crabb concertina, had metal ends with the fretwork usually associated with Crabb & Jeffries and bellows papers and gold stamping also associated with the same two makers. This instrument was also the spitting image of Anglo concertinas that are labeled as Ball Beavons. i wish I had some photos of the label but don't. Nevertheless, I feel comfortable saying that R & D retailed concertinas that were supplied by the “usual suspects” of famous makers. And the concertina shown in the original post was very likely made by Lachenal. Ross Schlabach
  26. Last week
  27. Wolf Molkentin

    Rushworth and Dreaper

    in fact it could very well be a - better - Lachenal - maybe Rushworth and Dreaper were retailers? will examine tomorrow
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