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Mike Pierceall

The Name Edeophone

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Does anyone know how the Edeophone got it's name? I understand the "ophone" part, but what about the "Ede?" Mike

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Does anyone know how the Edeophone got it's name? I understand the "ophone" part, but what about the "Ede?"

Named after one of the earliest Irish concertina players. Northern Irish, actually, first name of Edward. "Phone" means "sound", and because of the noises he made with his little box he earned the nickname "Edward of the Noises", or "Eddie O'Phone". :D

 

(And if you believe that, I have nice little German-made "Wheatstone" I'd like to sell you. Only £3000. :ph34r:)

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> "Phone" means "sound", and because of the noises he made with his little box he earned the >nickname "Edward of the Noises", or "Eddie O'Phone".

 

I have always thought it's because Eddie liked talking on a phone.

One learns as long as...

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"Phone" means "sound", and because of the noises he made with his little box he earned the nickname "Edward of the Noises", or "Eddie O'Phone".
I have always thought it's because Eddie liked talking on a phone. ...

No. The telephone wasn't invented until 1876, and Eddie was already annoying his neighbors some years before that. ;)

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..The telephone wasn't invented until 1876, and Eddie was already annoying his neighbors some years before that. ;)

..but the Edeophone design was only registered in 1889. I've usually heard it pronounced as 'EEdee' so I'd suggest it was Edith not Edward.

 

But on a more serious line :( , they later made a Jedcertina, named after J E Dallas, so Jim's joking may not be so far from the truth, although I can't think of a name associated with Lachenal with these initials.

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...on a more serious line :( , they later made a Jedcertina, named after J E Dallas, so Jim's joking may not be so far from the truth, although I can't think of a name associated with Lachenal with these initials.

Being serious, I'll note that it appears so far that we just don't know. "Edeo" does sound somewhat Greek, though. Anybody here know whether it would actually mean something in Greek (or Latin), and if so, what?

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...on a more serious line :( , they later made a Jedcertina, named after J E Dallas, so Jim's joking may not be so far from the truth, although I can't think of a name associated with Lachenal with these initials.

Being serious, I'll note that it appears so far that we just don't know. "Edeo" does sound somewhat Greek, though. Anybody here know whether it would actually mean something in Greek (or Latin), and if so, what?

Found a website that says edeo is of Greek origin not sure I can post on the forum what it said ...............oh well I am sure someone will tell me if I have overstepped the mark I quote direct from the website "Greek: genitals; pertaining to external genitals; privy parts; pudenta.

 

Theory from husband is that the word could have come from the Latin/Greek work oidema which is to swell! Oh well he thought that it could have musical connotations. As I don't know if the odeophone has a specific sound I really could not comment.

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...on a more serious line :( , they later made a Jedcertina, named after J E Dallas, so Jim's joking may not be so far from the truth, although I can't think of a name associated with Lachenal with these initials.

Being serious, I'll note that it appears so far that we just don't know. "Edeo" does sound somewhat Greek, though. Anybody here know whether it would actually mean something in Greek (or Latin), and if so, what?

Jim, "Eddy", ...a "current of air" by one definition, although the "O'Phone" family may dispute this. ;) Mike

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"Eddy", ...a "current of air" by one definition, although the "O'Phone" family may dispute this. ;)

Ah, they're just O(l)' Phoneys, anyway.

 

But one could wonder if someone at Lachenal was a punster, whose sense of humour (note British spelling) was otherwise lost to posterity. :unsure:

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Found a website that says edeo is of Greek origin... "Greek: genitals; pertaining to external genitals; privy parts; pudenta.

 

Theory from husband is that the word could have come from the Latin/Greek work oidema which is to swell! Oh well he thought that it could have musical connotations. As I don't know if the odeophone has a specific sound I really could not comment.

Good on your husband for noting the connection between "e" and "oi". In fact, "œdema" -- often spelled "edema" -- is a common English/Latin medical term for "swelling". Could be an example of multiple-meaning wordplay, as "swelling" is a frequent description of the sound of an organ, the instrument "swells" when the bellows is pulled, and the 12-sided shape of the ends could be viewed as a "swollen" hexagon. (The instrument also "inflames" passions, both pro and con, a condition often connected medically with swelling. :))

 

We still don't know, but the speculation is fun. :)

 

I find it interesting, though, that Lachenal spelled it "Edeophone" rather than "Œdeophone", while Wheatstone did spell theirs "Æola", not "Aeola" or "Aola".

 

Hey Paul Read, if you start making 8-sided concertinas, will you call them "Eholas". :ph34r:

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Then there's this one:

 

EDEO - Episcopal Diocesan Ecumenical Officers. The national network of those holding ecumenical responsibilities in Episcopal Church dioceses.

 

Found a website that says edeo is of Greek origin... "Greek: genitals; pertaining to external genitals; privy parts; pudenta.

 

Theory from husband is that the word could have come from the Latin/Greek work oidema which is to swell! Oh well he thought that it could have musical connotations. As I don't know if the odeophone has a specific sound I really could not comment.

Good on your husband for noting the connection between "e" and "oi". In fact, "œdema" -- often spelled "edema" -- is a common English/Latin medical term for "swelling". Could be an example of multiple-meaning wordplay, as "swelling" is a frequent description of the sound of an organ, the instrument "swells" when the bellows is pulled, and the 12-sided shape of the ends could be viewed as a "swollen" hexagon. (The instrument also "inflames" passions, both pro and con, a condition often connected medically with swelling. :))

 

We still don't know, but the speculation is fun. :)

 

I find it interesting, though, that Lachenal spelled it "Edeophone" rather than "Œdeophone", while Wheatstone did spell theirs "Æola", not "Aeola" or "Aola".

 

Hey Paul Read, if you start making 8-sided concertinas, will you call them "Eholas". :ph34r:

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Theory from husband is that the word could have come from the Latin/Greek work oidema which is to swell! Oh well he thought that it could have musical connotations. As I don't know if the odeophone has a specific sound I really could not comment.

May I conclude that an Edeophone is more or less like "Concertinus Erectus" :unsure: :lol:

Is that the reason for your typo "odeophone" :lol: :lol:

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Then there's this one:

EDEO - Episcopal Diocesan Ecumenical Officers. The national network of those holding ecumenical responsibilities in Episcopal Church dioceses.

But was that acronym current in 1896? :unsure:

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May I conclude that an Edeophone is more or less like "Concertinus Erectus" :unsure: :lol:

You mean like the one on the cover of Bertram Levy's The Anglo Concertina Demystified?

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Hey Paul Read, if you start making 8-sided concertinas, will you call them "Eholas". :ph34r:

 

Ehmen to that Jim.

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Found a website that says edeo is of Greek origin... "Greek: genitals; pertaining to external genitals; privy parts; pudenta.

 

Theory from husband is that the word could have come from the Latin/Greek work oidema which is to swell! Oh well he thought that it could have musical connotations. As I don't know if the odeophone has a specific sound I really could not comment.

Good on your husband for noting the connection between "e" and "oi". In fact, "œdema" -- often spelled "edema" -- is a common English/Latin medical term for "swelling". Could be an example of multiple-meaning wordplay, as "swelling" is a frequent description of the sound of an organ, the instrument "swells" when the bellows is pulled, and the 12-sided shape of the ends could be viewed as a "swollen" hexagon. (The instrument also "inflames" passions, both pro and con, a condition often connected medically with swelling. :))

 

We still don't know, but the speculation is fun. :)

 

I find it interesting, though, that Lachenal spelled it "Edeophone" rather than "Œdeophone", while Wheatstone did spell theirs "Æola", not "Aeola" or "Aola".

 

Hey Paul Read, if you start making 8-sided concertinas, will you call them "Eholas". :ph34r:

Jim, here are some other leads: "Ideophone" ..."A vivid representation of an idea in sound." or "Idiophone" an instrument like the Aeolsklavier, which sounds by the movement of air from bellows over wooden reeds, (paraphrased). Mike

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