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Jim Besser

Theme Of The Month For December, 2014: 'tis The Season

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A few things from a recent concert. First a couple of Scandinavian tunes "I am so Glad each Christmas Eve" and Now It is Yule Again"

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/kbs2sj2uypq8hxt/08%20I%20am%20So%20Glad-Now%20it%20is%20Yule.mp3?dl=0

 

Then Two Wassails

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/x21gockptyjl6xp/09%20Two%20Wassails.mp3?dl=0

 

A set of Three Chanukah tunes

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/xwfi8fp53gqhg70/12%20Hannukah%20Songs.mp3?dl=0

 

And "Tu Scendi Della Stella" (You Came Down from the Stars)

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/mky01jqv2idq6sb/05%20Tu%20Scendi%20de%20lle%20Stelle%20.mp3?dl=0

 

Done on too little rehearsal, but still great fun. I hope you enjoy.

 

Wow, you've been busy. Great stuff, thanks!

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I think that the sound of the concertina in this tune is reminiscent of a pipe organ.

I am continually amazed at the big sound that such a little instrument can make!

 

Lo,How a rose E'er Blooming . First time through Jody Kruskal's arrangement. Second time through is my own.

 

 

Morse G/D Anglo

Edited by Daria

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I think that the sound of the concertina in this tune is reminiscent of a pipe organ.

I am continually amazed at the big sound that such a little instrument can make!

 

Lo,How a rose E'er Blooming . First time through Jody Kruskal's arrangement. Second time through is my own.

 

 

Morse G/D Anglo

 

Lovely playing, both lovely arrangements. I really like alternating melody from the right to the left on Anglo. It's a real challenge, and you did it well.

Edited by Jim Besser

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I think that the sound of the concertina in this tune is reminiscent of a pipe organ.

I am continually amazed at the big sound that such a little instrument can make!

 

Lo,How a rose E'er Blooming . First time through Jody Kruskal's arrangement. Second time through is my own.

 

Morse G/D Anglo

Well done, Daria. The Morse sounds great, and you really do it credit.

 

Bob Michel

Near Philly

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Wow - Lester Bailey on something other than a melodeon! And a single-action bass! Wonderful. And did I say happy birthday?

 

Yes, lovely, Lester. And the single-action bass English that Lester plays - did you notice is it coloured gold? Well, I recognised it as one of a number of concertinas that used to belong to the music hall act, The Fayre Four Sisters. They each had one bass, one baritone, one treble and one piccolo English concertina and Wheatstones were persuaded to provide them with gold coloured ones for their act because the normal black colour was considered too drab.

 

Here is a link to an article Richard Carlin wrote about them a few years ago and re-published in Concertina.com:

 

http://www.concertin...e-four-sisters/

 

Chris

Edited by Chris Drinkwater

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Season's Greetings.

 

A local seasonal tune from me this month, on anglo for a change - a Connor C/G to be precise. The chapel in Carlingcott, in the Somerset coalfield, had its own band from 1851 until the 1970s. When folklorists Bob and Jacky Patten visited the last band leader, George Williams, in 1981, he gave them this setting of Hark the Herald Angels Sing, here interpreted for anglo.

 

If you're wondering how the words fit, here it is again at the local singaround, accompanied on the same instrument.

 

And by way of comparison, a short clip from the carol service at the Blessed Church of the Virgin Mary, Emborough, in aid of the Children of Chernobyl. Accompaniment by the Old Somerset Russets village band, but with the English concertina very near the recorder! (Not me playing - I was leading the singing!)

 

All this Christmas music reminds me of the Christmas I spent at a hotel where there'd been a chess tournament. As I arrived, I could hear, through the open front door, all the players in the entrance hall reliving there best matches. Yes... "chess nuts boasting in an open foyer". Come on, the old ones are best at Christmas! Merry Christmas one and all.

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I may have posted this in 2013, but here it is again (and maybe I'll sit down in the music room and do something new, if I get myself a new camera as a pre-Christmas present...).

 

John Kirkpatrick's Chariots recorded on a 31-key modified-Jeffries-layout Morse C/G.

(For those keeping score at home, on this instrument I've replaced the G/A reeds in the "G row" with F/E reeds; the left thumb has F#/C reeds.)

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Season's Greetings.

 

A local seasonal tune from me this month, on anglo for a change - a Connor C/G to be precise. The chapel in Carlingcott, in the Somerset coalfield, had its own band from 1851 until the 1970s. When folklorists Bob and Jacky Patten visited the last band leader, George Williams, in 1981, he gave them this setting of Hark the Herald Angels Sing, here interpreted for anglo.

 

If you're wondering how the words fit, here it is again at the local singaround, accompanied on the same instrument.

 

And by way of comparison, a short clip from the carol service at the Blessed Church of the Virgin Mary, Emborough, in aid of the Children of Chernobyl. Accompaniment by the Old Somerset Russets village band, but with the English concertina very near the recorder! (Not me playing - I was leading the singing!)

 

All this Christmas music reminds me of the Christmas I spent at a hotel where there'd been a chess tournament. As I arrived, I could hear, through the open front door, all the players in the entrance hall reliving there best matches. Yes... "chess nuts boasting in an open foyer". Come on, the old ones are best at Christmas! Merry Christmas one and all.

 

Love the local tunes! Thanks.

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I may have posted this in 2013, but here it is again (and maybe I'll sit down in the music room and do something new, if I get myself a new camera as a pre-Christmas present...).

 

John Kirkpatrick's Chariots recorded on a 31-key modified-Jeffries-layout Morse C/G.

(For those keeping score at home, on this instrument I've replaced the G/A reeds in the "G row" with F/E reeds; the left thumb has F#/C reeds.)

 

Reposting is fine, and that's a great clip.

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Even if some people seem to be in indigestion with this Christmas tune, here is my attempt for “in the bleak midwinter”... I never heard it before the poll of december... It didn’t cross the english channel. I try to find other ways to accompagny with the left hand, some “overlap” techniques. A test..

 

https://soundcloud.com/thoon-1/in-the-bleak-midwinter

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Those growling bass chords certainly emphasise the bleakness of your particular mid- winter. !!

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As it "did not cross the channel" Tona, you are not hindered by long memories of the accepted versions and have produced a very fresh approach with nice experiments in a Tone Poem fashion....

 

:) Geoff.

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Even if some people seem to be in indigestion with this Christmas tune, here is my attempt for “in the bleak midwinter”... I never heard it before the poll of december... It didn’t cross the english channel. I try to find other ways to accompagny with the left hand, some “overlap” techniques. A test..

 

https://soundcloud.com/thoon-1/in-the-bleak-midwinter

 

Yes, a very fresh approach.

 

Your versions always give me a lot to think about - how to translate what you do on duet to the more limited world of the anglo. It's been eye opening!

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A local seasonal tune from me this month, on anglo for a change - a Connor C/G to be precise. The chapel in Carlingcott, in the Somerset coalfield, had its own band from 1851 until the 1970s. When folklorists Bob and Jacky Patten visited the last band leader, George Williams, in 1981, he gave them this setting of Hark the Herald Angels Sing, here interpreted for anglo.

 

If you're wondering how the words fit, here it is again at the local singaround, accompanied on the same instrument.

I enjoyed this - in particular the full take with the joint voices - immensely! So very cheerful, and fine concertina accompaniment too... :)

 

Merry Christmas to you too! Wolf

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Even if some people seem to be in indigestion with this Christmas tune, here is my attempt for “in the bleak midwinter”... I never heard it before the poll of december... It didn’t cross the english channel. I try to find other ways to accompagny with the left hand, some “overlap” techniques. A test..

 

https://soundcloud.com/thoon-1/in-the-bleak-midwinter

Wow! That was stunning!

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