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Jim Besser

Theme Of The Month For December, 2014: 'tis The Season

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Very nice orchestral arrangement Jody.

 

Thanks Geoff, thanks all.

 

Jim, it may be difficult to adapt duet techniques on anglo but the reverse is also true! I like anglo renditions of non irish tunes (Jody ´s renditions...) and I think that you Jim make a great job month after month on your anglo. (I also like some EC renditions which can provide a very particular atmosphere.)

 

Happy Christmas to all.

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I know I've posted this performance before, but not for a long time.

 

Gower Wassail with me singing and playing my Jefferies Bb/F Anglo, Pill Peek on guitar and directing the chorus of the Unitarian Brooklyn 1st Church at a concert back in 2008...

 

http://jodykruskal.com/tune_of_the_month/December_2008.html

 

Definitely worth reposting! Thanks.

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I know I've posted this performance before, but not for a long time.

 

Gower Wassail with me singing and playing my Jefferies Bb/F Anglo, Pill Peek on guitar and directing the chorus of the Unitarian Brooklyn 1st Church at a concert back in 2008...

 

http://jodykruskal.com/tune_of_the_month/December_2008.html

That's lovely Jody! Season's greetings - Wolf

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Here's a well-known seasonal tune from Shetland, and a last video offering for 2014:

 

http://youtu.be/iWi8USnUBQc

 

Like many of my contemporaries I learned it from The Boys of the Lough: before that album was released I'd heard them play it in Paris, of all places, at a wonderful concert that was partially responsible for launching me onto the slippery slope of traditional music in the first place. This means (sigh) that I've been noodling it on one instrument or another for a few months shy of forty years now. To celebrate that anniversary I invited several of those other instruments to the party.

 

So this is by way of a year's-end thank-you to my new friends at www.concertina.net, and of wishing you all a very happy Christmas--or whatever feast gladdens your heart.

 

Bob Michel

Near Philly

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Here's a well-known seasonal tune from Shetland, and a last video offering for 2014:

 

http://youtu.be/iWi8USnUBQc

 

Like many of my contemporaries I learned it from The Boys of the Lough: before that album was released I'd heard them play it in Paris, of all places, at a wonderful concert that was partially responsible for launching me onto the slippery slope of traditional music in the first place. This means (sigh) that I've been noodling it on one instrument or another for a few months shy of forty years now. To celebrate that anniversary I invited several of those other instruments to the party.

 

So this is by way of a year's-end thank-you to my new friends at www.concertina.net, and of wishing you all a very happy Christmas--or whatever feast gladdens your heart.

 

Bob Michel

Near Philly

 

Very nice.

 

What's your recording setup for multitracking?

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Since I started posting to YouTube I've worked out a system: the initial video is made on an iPad using an app called MoviePro. I use a Blue Yeti external mic (which, awkwardly, requires a USB hub and the Camera Connection Kit) on a stereo setting. Once I'm satisfied with the video (or just sick of messing with it), I upload it to Dropbox, then download it to a PC. I import the video to Audacity as a sound file (you need an add-on for this; it's explained in their manual) and tweak it very slightly: noise removal, and just a touch of compression and reverb.

 

Any subsequent tracks are recorded directly into Audacity using the same mic, tweaked in a similar way, then panned to give the mix a stereo image; the mix is exported as a .wav file. I load the video file into Microsoft Movie Maker and replace the original soundtrack with the .wav file from Audacity. Then it's just a matter of adding a title and a couple of stupid visual tricks (my video-making skill set is pretty basic). I export the video in the format optimized for YouTube, and upload it.

 

It probably sounds complicated (and could probably be streamlined by someone more knowledgeable), but given a decent initial take it can all take well under an hour. One of these days I'll improve the set-up, but for now this method seems to work O.K.

 

Bob Michel

Near Philly

Edited by Bob Michel

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Since I started posting to YouTube I've worked out a system: the initial video is made on an iPad using an app called MoviePro. I use a Blue Yeti external mic (which, awkwardly, requires a USB hub and the Camera Connection Kit) on a stereo setting. Once I'm satisfied with the video (or just sick of messing with it), I upload it to Dropbox, then download it to a PC. I import the video to Audacity as a sound file (you need an add-on for this; it's explained in their manual) and tweak it very slightly: noise removal, and just a touch of compression and reverb.

 

Any subsequent tracks are recorded directly into Audacity using the same mic, tweaked in a similar way, then panned to give the mix a stereo image; the mix is exported as a .wav file. I load the video file into Microsoft Movie Maker and replace the original soundtrack with the .wav file from Audacity. Then it's just a matter of adding a title and a couple of stupid visual tricks (my video-making skill set is pretty basic). I export the video in the format optimized for YouTube, and upload it.

 

It probably sounds complicated (and could probably be streamlined by someone more knowledgeable), but given a decent initial take it can all take well under an hour. One of these days I'll improve the set-up, but for now this method seems to work O.K.

 

Bob Michel

Near Philly

 

Thanks! Sounds like a lot of work, but your recordings are great.

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Another great performance Bob. Your mastery of the accompanying electronics combined with your fabulous Anglo playing Is a delight. Encore !

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Another great performance Bob. Your mastery of the accompanying electronics combined with your fabulous Anglo playing Is a delight. Encore !

Mastery of electronics?!? I still own a VCR, and it still blinks "12:00." As for the TV, I succeed in turning it on perhaps two times in three. (I'm not making this up.)

 

But you're very kind to say so. I'm enjoying making the videos, particularly the ones that involve a bit of a musical stretch.

 

Bob Michel

Near Philly

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Bob, I am curious ( probably in more ways than one ! ). Are you a multi-instrumentalist and creating the accompaniments to the Anglo lead before merging them electronically to create the finished video. I don't begin to understand the processes involved in spite of your ' splendid ' explanation. I think we are hearing guitar, flute and banjo, are we not ? I am guessing that you are playing all four instruments ? ( If so, long live the one-man-band. ! )

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Bob, I am curious ( probably in more ways than one ! ). Are you a multi-instrumentalist and creating the accompaniments to the Anglo lead before merging them electronically to create the finished video. I don't begin to understand the processes involved in spite of your ' splendid ' explanation. I think we are hearing guitar, flute and banjo, are we not ? I am guessing that you are playing all four instruments ? ( If so, long live the one-man-band. ! )

I'd made a bunch of very simple YouTube videos earlier in the fall, playing various instruments, just for my own enjoyment, and to learn how it's done. Eventually I started overdubbing a little accompaniment, and one thing led to another. Yes, on this one I play the instruments you mentioned, plus mandolin and C#/D melodeon/button accordion.

 

The first step--making the actual video of me playing the concertina--is straightforward as can be: you could do it with a tablet, videocam, digital camera in video mode, or whatever toy you have handy. If you can then get this video file onto a computer, its soundtrack can be opened using the free program Audacity--and then the fun begins. All you need to play along with yourself is a way of getting sound into the computer and a set of headphones.

 

I'm sure I could do it all on the tablet, in fact: I have the rather amazing multitracking app Auria, which can do most of what Audacity does and some other things besides. But I haven't yet sorted out how to make the apps play well together; hence my recourse to the old tried-and-true PC.

 

Anyway, I'm glad you enjoyed the experiment(s). I've been fooling around with recording at home for the last ten or twelve years, and the technology just keeps getting easier to use.

 

Bob Michel

Near Philly

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Thanks for your reply Bob. I'm beginning to grasp what it's all about now. It guess that one of the advantages of the system is that you are master of the entire enterprise and have complete control over the finished product as opposed to having to strike any sort of compromise with a collection of other musicians ? I can well imagine all the fun and satisfaction that you must derive from it all. An excellent system and you certainly make a splendid job of it.

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Hey Jim,

 

At my dance last weekend we played Parry Sound Reel (G) and Jingle Bells (D) in a set with something.

 

First waltz... It Came Upon a Midnight Clear, last waltz... Silent Night

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