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david fabre

Concertina mental diseases

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I can see two of them :

 

"Concertina obsessive acquisition disorder" (COAD)

"Concertina compulsive acquisition syndrom" (CCAS)

 

Is it just that the official nomenclature has changed once again or are they really two different affections ?

What are the symptoms and cures in each case ?

Are there other forms of the disease ?

 

Do we have a psy here who could clarify ???

Edited by david fabre

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There is no cure. Running completely out of money and thus not being able to purchase more concertinas is a quick "fix" but isn't lasting.

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Is there any hope of finding a cure for "concertina face"? I'll never forget a visitor to a session wondering if the concertina player was blind...

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Is there any hope of finding a cure for "concertina face"? I'll never forget a visitor to a session wondering if the concertina player was blind...

 

How about a cure for "concertina fingers".....your fingers twitching nervously with withdrawal symptoms.....you find yourself playing an invisible concertina and can not wait until you get your hands on your favourite 'tina....

Edited by Ben

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There is no cure...

Some ground breaking research has shown that putting the patient permanently into an induced coma can slow down the rate of concertina purchasing. It's hoped that this technique in combination with total isolation may be able to completely halt the buying of instruments altogether after a couple of years of treatment.

Edited by Woody

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Concertina Mulit-Instrument Syndrome (CMIS).

 

It has a cousin, Free-reed Multiple Instrument Syndrom (FRMIS)

 

I'm told that there are acquisition symptoms and system playing symptioms. Some people see dots with flags, others letters between A & G. Can be accompanied by uncontrolled fits of swearing, singing or both. Mood swings from dispair to elation in a single minute are not uncommon!

 

They are costly maladies.

 

Both related to basic Multi-Insturment Syndrom (MIS). And to think I wanted a career in MIS at one point? :lol: .

Edited by saguaro_squeezer

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I didn't compleatly get ben's joke the names of the docter are like names of known concertinas or something? any I don't have that proplem probably because I can't affored more than one concertina and even that was just a 350$ jackie (now it costs 365$) and not a 3000$ concertina. but I kind of have with musical instraments in general though I still don't have enough money for that either but when I'll be older maby I'll beable to aford these things.

Edited by ido

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About the "concertina face" syndrom, glad to hear that I'm not an isolated case !

Since I've seen photos of me I try hard to control my facial expression, but I'm afraid it's too late...

 

About the twitching fingers trouble, curiously I only suffer from the whistle variant. I've been playing whistle

for a longer time so those fingerings must be more deeply anchored into my brain.

 

......have to wait three years to see Dr. Dipper, four years to see Dr. W. Carroll, ....

... 23 mounths for Dr Norman ; and my turn is approaching !

 

I'm surprised to learn that the waiting list for Thomas is only "less than 1 year". His services do not seem to be a step

lower in quality compared to others with several years of wait. How temptating....

( NO !! CONTROL YOURSELF !! DON'T RELAPSE !!!!)

Edited by david fabre

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two qustions

1.explain the hole docter thing.

2.what's? a concertina face?

 

every one seems to get this here besides me

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For ido:

 

The "doctors" mentioned above are concertina makers currently active (with some indication of their waiting lists, but check with a manufacturer before ordering!).

 

It has been noticed that concertina players tend to have a blank face with lots of concentration while playing (noted in several videos).

 

It may be that when you have several concertinas with different sounds (I have two trebles, a tenor-treble, a baritone, and a crane) you might decide that you have enough. Perhaps Concertina Acquisition Syndrome can go into remission!

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It has been noticed that concertina players tend to have a blank face with lots of concentration while playing (noted in several videos).

 

 

There is another strain of concertina face, whereby a combination of key elements of the tune and particularly difficult fingering passages are marked by a grimace, a frown, or in extreme cases the protrusion of the tip of the tongue through the lips.

 

My own particular affliction is the grimace. (Hello group, my name is Steve, and I've had a concertina face for many years).

 

Prior to diagnosis fellow band members were convinced that I had either detected a bad smell in the room, or I was horrified at whatever free jazz wig-outs the saxophone section were up at the time. The only known cure is watching videos and seeing photographs of yourself performing, reinforced by heckling from the aforementioned saxophone players if any momentary on-stage relapse is detected ...

 

 

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It may be that when you have several concertinas with different sounds (I have two trebles, a tenor-treble, a baritone, and a crane) you might decide that you have enough. Perhaps Concertina Acquisition Syndrome can go into remission!

 

Larry,

That may be, but somehow I doubt it ... :P

 

I think some instruments are more dangerous in this respect than others. I first heard of the disorder in question in the autohap community, where it's called Musical Instrument Acquisition Syndrome (MIAS - which is what American spouses say when you say you need another 'harp: "Another 'harp - my *ss!")

 

Autoharps are particularly treacherous. You start with a standard chromatic, which allows the 3-chord trick in 6 major keys and a couple of minors. Then you hear that a 1- or 2-key diatonic has a fuller sound and more sophisticated chords, so you get another 'harp and set it up accordingly. But then you have to play with people who prefer other keys, and you need a second diatonic. Then you start playing in church, where the hymns are in flat keys, and with bluegrassers who use a lot of sharp keys, and your standard chromatic can't manage both, so you need two chromatics, one for flat keys and one for sharp keys. And so on ...

The problem is compacted by the fact that autoharpsare relatively cheap - you can get a decent 'harp for the price of a cheap, Chinese concertina, and a luthier-made top-level 'harp for about the price of a good hybrid concertina.

 

Anglo concertinas share some of the features of the autoharp. They are in principle 2-key diatonics, and you may feel you need both a C/G and a G/D to be comfortable everywhere. Oh, yes, and an F/C is nice for accompanying some kinds of voice. But of course, carrying three Anglos is a bit of a niusance, so you really need a chromatic - an EC or a Duet. Or both.:huh:

 

It may be just my ignorance, but a clarinet is just a clarinet, and a violin is just a violin. One is all you need. Unless you start with a cheap one and need a better one later on, in which case you sell the first one. This applies to autoharps and concertinas as well, of course, but the old autoharp is usually retained and reconfigured in different keys, and the old concertina is retained for more rugged environments, where beauty of tone is not so important.

 

And don't ask me about 5-string banjos ... :angry: Just be glad it's only concertinas, in your case! :D

 

Cheers,

John

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There's a guy in my band with one of each kind of clarinet-- believe me that's a lot! (He also has three cellos, a couple of accordions, and a concert grand piano.)

 

I may be helped with concertina acquisition syndrome by the fact that I play EC, not anglo, so they come in a limited number of different ranges, not different keys. Still, a bass would be tempting. Maybe I'm still susceptible.

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It may be just my ignorance, but a clarinet is just a clarinet, and a violin is just a violin. One is all you need.

 

Well you can get an octave violin, and a 5 string violin. And acoustic, and electro-acoustic and an electric.

 

I'd love an electric 5 string myself....

Edited by LDT

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