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Found 133 results

  1. Bill N

    Morse Ceili C/G for sale

    Black Satin Finish, Upgraded Tipo a Mano reeds Modified Jeffries (Kensington) layout I bought this new in October, 2017 to play while recovering from an elbow injury because of its very light weight and easy action. I’m back to playing my traditionally reeded instrument and can’t afford to keep two C/Gs. It’s essentially like new, except that the bellows are nicely played in, and there is a bit of patina on the fretwork around the most commonly played buttons. Also, there are a pair of slight “dimples” on the fretwork where microphones were attached (see photo-just right of label). It comes with the Button Box hard case. This is a fast, responsive box, and the upgraded reeds are very “concertina-like” in tone. The Kensington layout http://www.kensingtonconcertinas.com/standard-layout/ is particularly well suited for ITM style playing, but I used it as an all rounder, playing English and Contra repertoire as well. This was US $2745 (Can $3560) new, plus shipping and tax. I’m now asking US $2100 plus shipping. This would be a particularly good deal for a fellow Canadian because there would be no HST. I am in the Hamilton/Toronto area and could meet up locally for try-outs.
  2. Greetings, A few years ago I was given this 34 button C/G anglo. It came with what looks to me like its original wooden box, minus the carrying handle and key. The instrument belonged to my great-great grandfather, who lived in east London sometime in the second half of the XIXth century. As you can see from the photos, instrument is in pretty good nick, considering no-one must have played it for many decades. It is pretty much in tune, although a couple of reeds buzz and the two buttons at the treble end of the right-hand side accidentals row don't produce any sound. Apart from that, the straps need replacing as the leather is very nearly worn through where they go through the brass loop at the end of the hand rest. As far as the layout goes, I haven't been able to find a layout that matches exactly. One feature that I have heard is a bit unusual is a low C drone button on the left hand I haven't opened the instrument yet, although I will once I have mustered up the courage. There are no markings of any kind that I can see on the outside, the metal facing on the right hand end has an oval window, but unlike other concertinas I have seen, there is no label in it. Does anybody know who the manufacturer could be?
  3. John Sylte

    Scored A Miniature Lachenal

    Check this little 20 button beauty out. Not quite 4" flat to flat. She is right in between Eb/Bb and E/B, and beautifully in tune with herself, but not as airtight as I would like. Serial number 48556 by one source appears to have been made 1876 ish? Is this a rare specimen or pretty common? It has amazing sound for such a small thing...
  4. I have a wheatestone C/G anglo with the standard 30-button layout on which I play primarily irish music. I have seen some discussion on modified/hybrid layouts for ITM, but they have all been focused on the mid-range, usually focusing the C#. I am getting fairly comfortable with the wheatstone system in this sense, but there is one thing that has continued to bug me. I would really like to have the D below middle C to throw in chords. As it is I can throw in a nice low G, A or E and even the odd C, but the one I would get the most use out of for irish music woudl be that D. Does anyone have experience modifying the layout in this range? Are there any particular issues one might run into or reason's not to do it. I realize that there could be some issues with differently sized reeds on the low end. Here is the mod that seems the most obvious to me. Remove the low F natural on the pull (top row, far left) and replace that with the low G. (That low F is probably my least used button on the left hand side anyways). Then replace the existing low G pull (Mid row, far left) with a low D pull. It seems like this should be fine space-wise as the G should be the same length or shorter than the F, and the D would be on the same as the low C, so there should be room for it. Plus I think it should only require one new reed since the low-G would just be moved. Moreover this layout seems like it would have nice options for a DA fifth and and an inverted GD fifth on the pull in that leftmost column, As well as a nice D octave combo in the middle row. The lowG-mid D pull that I currently use on the pull would be slightly more awkward, but not prohibatively so. I would love to know if anyone has advice regarding either the ease with which I can find someone who make such a modification (It is beyond my own tinkering ability and comfort) and also if anyone has other alternative layouts for the low range. I am not in any particular hurry, but I do think I will want to do it eventually, maybe once it is in need of a general tuneup. Of course the other option would be down the road to look for a different instrument with more than 30 buttons, but I have a bad habit of acquiring too many instruments as it is. Thank you.
  5. perspiration

    A Lot Of Newbie Questions

    Hi all, might be a long post coming up so bear with me! I recently acquired a new-to-me Rochelle and have been enjoying the last week or so, practicing an hour or two a day. I'm working through the beginning of Gary Coover's books Easy Anglo 1-2-3 and Anglo Concertina in the Harmonic Style. I'm planning on setting up a couple lessons with a teacher soon, but wanted to plunk around for a little while first to get a sense of what challenges I might be facing. I have a feeling a lot of my questions will be addressed when it comes time for one-on-one lessons, but this community seems like a wealth of talent and experience. I have some questions that I'd love input / feedback on from a concertina player's perspective - thanks for anything you have to share Practice Questions 1. What is a good "structure" for an hour-long practice session? Currently I start by playing a few of the "easier" songs from Gary's books to nail in the muscle memory. As they've become easier, I focus on consistent note length, tempo, and general "smoothness". Sometimes I see how fast I can or can't play something. The bulk of the session is then moving farther "right" in the practice books, getting to the next song down the list that I can't play easily yet. I enjoy that Gary's books seem to slowly introduce new skills with each song - slowly adding the G row, then the pinky finger, and so on. 2. Should I be working in music theory time? And is learning to play solely via tablature going to hurt me in the future? I'd like to make sure I'm "learning the instrument" and not just "learning songs". I have experience reading music / playing music from trombone in school for 6-7 years, but this instrument is, well, quite a bit different from low brass. Instrument Questions 3. How do I not run out of air? It seems like I'm constantly ending up with the concertina "closed". Maybe it's just the beginner songs I'm playing, but I don't often have enough "pull" time to compensate for how much "pushing" I do. I end up taking "breaths" via the air button between phrases, but this inserts a big pause into the music and isn't very smooth. 3a. How do I compensate for the lack of air pressure when using the air button while playing notes? I try to fix #3's problem by using the air button while playing notes, but then whatever note I'm playing loses a LOT of power. I'm not very good at compensating by simultaneously pulling/pushing harder -- is this the right approach? 4. One or two of my middle row buttons on the right side sounds very "tinny" when I play it - is this an instrument problem? The fourth button "down" in the right-hand C row has a sloppy buzz to it when I play - is this a function of a relatively cheap concertina, or could this be an instrument repair problem? I could record it tonight if it makes it easier. It's a little disappointing, I must admit. **EDIT** 5. Totally forgot to ask - the left side of my concertina sounds SO much louder than the right side. Is this expected? It seems obvious that the deeper notes would be louder than the thinner upper register, but is there a way to compensate for this while playing? Watching youtubes and such, I haven't noticed the low end completely overpowering the high end, but when I sit and play it definitely seems like the low notes are really "in front" of the higher ones. That's pretty much what I've been dealing with for a week now. I appreciate any advice y'all might have to share.
  6. I am selling my 4-CD set, “300 Gems of Irish Music for All Instruments,” for only $5.99 USD. See https://greylarsen.com/shop/product/300-gems-recordings-mp3s-or-set-of-4-cds/. This price is good through March 31st, 2018. All six of my Irish music books and most of my CDs are also heavily discounted throughout March. For all the info, go to: https://greylarsen.com/webstore/st-patricks-month-sale/. This audio collection is a companion to my book “300 Gems of Irish Music for All Instruments.” (See https://greylarsen.com/shop/product/300-gems-of-irish-music-for-all-instruments/). All 300 tunes are notated in the book. Free excerpts are available as PDF downloads (at http://greylarsen.com/webstore/books/). (Scroll down a bit to find the excerpts.) Many of the transcriptions pay homage to recordings by great musicians and groups such as Matt Molloy, Martin Hayes, Sharon Shannon, Mary Bergin, Kevin Burke, James Kelly, Willie Clancy, Altan, the Bothy Band and the Mulcahy Family, as well as early 20th century recordings from revered masters Michael Coleman, Paddy Killoran, Dennis Murphy, Bobby Casey, Paddy Canny and others. The tunes are notated in a style that makes them equally accessible to players of fiddle, flute, whistle, accordion, concertina, harp, keyboard, guitar, mandolin, banjo, uilleann pipes – to all melody players. I play the tunes on Irish flute, tin whistle, and 49 of the tunes on my Wheatstone 12-sided anglo concertina from the 1930s. (See photo below.) This is an excellent resource for repertoire building and makes a nice gift. Also, I designed the tune sequence such that good medleys result when you play consecutive tunes one after another. (At least I think so.) To buy only the 49 concertina tunes, go here: https://greylarsen.com/shop/product/49-concertina-tunes-from-300-gems-of-irish-music-for-all-instruments/ For $9.99, you can get the entire collection as 300 downloadable mp3s, and save shipping costs. This costs less than getting the CDs if you are in Canada, Mexico or outside of North America. The mp3s can be found here: https://greylarsen.com/shop/product/300-gems-recordings-mp3s-or-set-of-4-cds/. Choose “MP3s” from the drop-down menu. The CD set is so inexpensive because I have piles of them on my shelves! Time to move them out into the world. I make no profit at this price, but I have the pleasure of spreading the music around. Thank you for your attention! - Grey
  7. Cohen Braithwaite-Kilcoyne's final recital at Leeds Uni has some of the most amazing anglo playing I have ever heard. After listening to this a few times yesterday, I'm speechless with admiration. Enjoy... https://livestream.com/uol/final-recitals-17/videos/157705262 Adrian
  8. I'm looking into ordering a (accordion style) reed set for a 30 key C/G anglo build I have under work. I have an "early" Rochelle at the moment and through the build I hope I will get at least a smaller and lighter instrument. Aiming for an upgrade in the playability as well. Buying a better instrument unfortunately is not an option at the moment as money is scarce. Looking through the forum posts it seems several people have ordered reed sets from Harmonikas. I would appreciate any shared insight into ordering specifics (e.q. how did you specify the set) and price differences between sets (A mano professional, Tipo a mano & export dural). Also how am I supposed to read the plate dimensions (sortiment sizes pdf)? I'm not familiar with reed combinations used in accordions, so would the dimensions be different for reed-combinations specific for a concertina? Or would you happen to have them for a 30k c/g set? I'd like to start working on (drawing and machining) the reedpans as my access to a cnc milling tool is limited and in worst case any workshop access might come to an abrupt end. I'm aware it's not the ideal order of doing things but ah so it go.
  9. Reposting this as I am still looking to sell a Jeffries concertina as above. In C/G with 26 keys, making it a lighter instrument. It's also very loud. The accidentals are C#/ Eb A/G Ab/Bb on the Left hand and Eb/C# Ab/G C#/Bb on the Right. metal ends original bone keys. Assessed by a knowledgeable friend as in good working order. Looking for around £3600 plus postage. Please see pictures as attached and feel free to ask any more questions, many thanks Jo, Sheffield UK
  10. A very nice comment on "The Concertina Diaires" tutor (Heather Greer). A buyer, who is from Ireland but now living in C&E Europe, while waiting for his copy of the book to arrive, worked his way through the sample pages from the book that are up on our website, www.IrishTunebook.com. "I have read your sample pages [on your website], and from these alone I have learned more, and more quickly, than all the other books that I have on this subject put together. Please feel free to use this comment in your advertisments." Colin A. Just thought I'd pass that nice comment along. Oh, and in the coming week I aim to post downloadable music, with 'fingerings' for 30-button Anglo (Wheatstone but you can modify as necessary for Jeffries), two nice jigs in D major that go together very nicely as a complementary 2-D set: 'Seamus Connolly's' and the lovely, twisty-turny, 'Rosemary Lane'. If you want to really major out on an all-D set, adding in Tobin's Jig makes for a good third jig to include.
  11. Price is £2,000 plus shipping (about £100). Lachenal, new six-fold bellows, new pads/springs. Metal ends on ebonized wood frame. Good action. 30 button C/G plus bird-song and cock crow novelty buttons. Recently tuned to A=440. Made around 1930. Excellent visual condition and plays well. It is in Hong Kong at present. Steel reeds. The serial number is 114088. Here is a sound sample: https://drive.google...iew?usp=sharing The original case is no longer suitable because of the change to six-fold bellows from five. The Lachenal paper label is not an original: I think the paper a copy. E instrument is genuine.
  12. I am selling my 4-CD set, “300 Gems of Irish Music for All Instruments,” for only $4.99 USD. See http://greylarsen.co...-84SII1MytPIfg1 . This price is good through January 5th, 2018. This audio collection is a companion to my book “300 Gems of Irish Music for All Instruments.” (See http://greylarsen.co...products_id=107). All 300 tunes are notated in the book. Free excerpts are available as PDF downloads (at http://greylarsen.com/webstore/books/). Many of the transcriptions pay homage to recordings by great musicians and groups such as Matt Molloy, Martin Hayes, Sharon Shannon, Mary Bergin, Kevin Burke, James Kelly, Willie Clancy, Altan, the Bothy Band and the Mulcahy Family, as well as early 20th century recordings from revered masters Michael Coleman, Paddy Killoran, Dennis Murphy, Bobby Casey, Paddy Canny and others. The tunes are notated in a style that makes them equally accessible to players of fiddle, flute, whistle, accordion, concertina, harp, keyboard, guitar, mandolin, banjo, uilleann pipes – to all melody players. I play the tunes on Irish flute, tin whistle, and 49 of the tunes on my Wheatstone 12-sided anglo concertina from the 1930s. This is an excellent resource for repertoire building and makes a nice gift. Also, I designed the tune sequence such that good medleys result when you play consecutive tunes one after another. (At least I think so.) To buy only the 49 concertina tunes, go here: http://greylarsen.co...products_id=108. xsdz For $9.99, you can get the same collection as 300 downloadable mp3s, and save shipping costs. This costs less than getting the CDs if you are in Canada, Mexico or outside of North America. The mp3s can be found here: http://greylarsen.co...products_id=111 . The CD set is so inexpensive because I have piles of them on my shelves! Time to move them out into the world. I make no profit at this price, but I have the pleasure of spreading the music around. Most of my CDs are also on sale for $9.00 USD: http://greylarsen.com/store/catalog/index.php?cPath=22_40. And all my books are $7 off - http://greylarsen.com/store/catalog/index.php?cPath=25_44_78. Thank you for your attention, and happy holidays! - Grey
  13. I'm new to this forum and to the concertina community and need some advice. A bit of background: I am a choral conductor and pianist. I'm the music director at a church in Dallas, Texas. I read music fluently and play by ear a bit but not am not gifted this way. In recent years I've discovered I enjoy a good stout in an Irish pub so have become curious about ITM (Irish Traditional Music) and that lead to doing some research on the concertina. I understand in broad terms the different key arrangements and the terms unisonoric/bisonoric of the English, Anglo and Duet systems. Here is my question: as a pianist and music reader will I make faster progress with which system? What do you think will be more intuitive and therefore I will be able to manage the learning curve in order to make music? I'm eager to hear your responses. McDouglas in Dallas
  14. Trying to find a secondhand mid to high end instrument in the US with a Jeffries layout C/G, would consider 38 keys too. A Suttner would be first my first choice but I know they're rarely seen used. PM if you might have something - I've checked all the usual online shops. Thanks
  15. gcoover

    Something For Christmas

    All, Thought some of you might enjoy learning a few Christmas songs (from Christmas Concertina) so you can get ready for the big holiday season. So, here's an easy version of Silent Night, Hark the Herald Angels Sing, and perhaps my favorite arrangement in the whole book - In the Bleak Midwinter. The music includes the melody in regular musical notation along with button numbers for Anglo Concertina (Wheatstone/Lachenal accidentals). Also posted is an explanation of the tablature and numbering system. And, you can hear videos of these arrangements at: https://www.youtube.com/user/angloconc(Christmas Concertina playlist). Enjoy! Gary SilentNight-CHRISTMAS-CONCERTINA.pdf HarkTheHeraldAngelsSing-CHRISTMAS-CONCERTINA.pdf InTheBleakMidwinter-CHRISTMAS-CONCERTINA.pdf Tablature-Example-CHRISTMAS-CONCERTINA.pdf
  16. Hello good ole Concertina.net forum. I haven't been here in years! I've been playing all along, down here in the quiet confines of the Delmarva Peninsula. A few years ago my dear musician husband passed away and I have recently purchased my own house insurance to which I need to add my instruments on extra extension of coverage. I have a Suttner A2 Anglo #116 and I need to value a replacement. With a quick search on the internet I did not find anyone in the USA selling these off the shelf. Jürgen is still making these, but the wait is now 2-1/2 years. To me, the price is not just the price when you need immediate replacement and there is that long wait. How do I present this to the insurance agent at a price to be realistic in the face of potential catastrophe? It would be great to hear from you again. ~ Jan Dover, Delaware
  17. I have a G/D Edgely Professional 30 button Anglo concertina in excellent condition, Pau Ferro wood, wooden ends, recently overhauled by the maker, for sale or trade. $2000 plus shipping, or might consider a trade for a comparable C/G Anglo or a Morse Albion English concertina in like condition. Pics to follow. Thanks
  18. Here's a video of John Watcham playing for Harry Taylor's Men at the recent Sidmouth Festival - a double jig in the Longborough style based on the Playford tune "Mundesse". https://youtu.be/eFW6s7c--PE More info on Taylor's Men here: http://taylorsmen.org/
  19. gavdav

    Seeking The Right G/d Anglo

    looking for a Wheatstone layout anglo in G/D (or possibly even F/C) with left hand drone. Probably not after a Lachenal unless it's exceptional. what's out there?
  20. Hi I've already used this forum quite succesfully once, so now I need help again, let's see if it will be the same this time. I'm looking for one of these Lachenal anglos with inserted into ebony metal ends. I have the small size 26 buttons one, and I like it so much i decided to get myself 30+ buttons. You can see what I'm talking about on these pictures I don't want to buy full size (6 1/4''), something around 5 3/4 - 5 7/8 will be perfect. To give you an idea of what I'd like to buy - here's the one I've just missed http://www.irishmusik.com/lachenal-anglo-concertina So if you have one of those you're thinking of selling or if you know somebody who has one, please let me know. In fact, i'd be glad to hear from you even if you just have one and not going to sell it, just to share the info
  21. With considerable regret, need to sell these two instruments. Duet is full-sized; anglo is 3-7/8" across flats. Little played, and stored carefully for some time - playable now but need exercise. Prefer to sell in person if at all possible, or via reliable intermediary. Location: Boston, MA USA. Please message privately for any required information. Advice on current pricing will be much appreciated. If sold to or through anyone ehere, will donate appropriately to site management. Thanks in advance for your interest. May the music continue forever!
  22. Michael Rooney will be at the Boxwood Festival in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, Canada from July 23-29, 2017. Visit the Boxwood website at http://boxwood.org/canada_artistsfor more information.
  23. Concertina player & harpist Michael Rooney will be performing in concert in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, Canada. Details: Central United Church, 136 Cumberland St., Lunenburg, NS Canada Time: 7:30 pm Tickets: Available at the door or through http://boxwood.org/canada_events
  24. Long time lurker here, hope to post more in the future. I've been playing a C/G hybrid for about a year now and have come to the tentative conclusion that for my primary use case (Morris), I'd be better off with a G/D since I want to be able to play harmonies and chords with other morris musicians. I've gotten to a point where it's easy enough to play our repertoire tunes in C or F harmonically, but if I stay in G my options are much more limited and I tend to end up playing melody only, which isn't terribly interesting for me. Opinions on this conclusion are welcome, of course, but onto the main question: Sometimes I'll see a used G/D for sale, but half the time it's got a Jeffries layout. I'm much more comfortable with Wheatstone, but I don't want to always be passing up a good deal if it would be easy/affordable to have it converted. So... would it be? I'm mainly talking about hybrids here since they're affordable and readily available; I understand the reed pans are a different beast from those in "nice" concertinas. But since I also want to invest in a nice one at some point, the question applies there, too. Much obliged for any advice from all you sages on the forum. Luke
  25. Hello. I've just purchased a East German Anglo concertina here in Brazil (concertinas are not usual in this country) and was lucky since It was inexpensive - less than US$100 - and in great condition. I research for it's brand "BM" and couldn't find anything, but in my search I've found similar ones made in Klingenthal as Scholer, Galotta and Rosetti Rambler. Does anybody know anything about BM and why there is no mention to that brand in internet? My instrument is a 20 button D/G and has two reeds per note, but the second button on G row at bass side which should be D/E (according to the standard 20 button D/G layout), in mine sounds D/F#. Other 19 notes sound as expected, althought a little out of tune. Is this right? Are the D/G Scholers, Galottas and RRs tuned like that? Thanks.
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