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Found 11 results

  1. the closet concertinist

    HELP loose lever posts

    Hey, I’ve recently acquired an Anglo Wheatstone that sounds like it has done its fair share of travelling and been around for a bit. I’ve been having an absolute blast with it but I am starting to run into an issue. The “posts” (I don’t know if that’s correct terminology) that hold down the spring and lever of the button are starting to work their way loose as I play. Sometime it’s just a little bit of air that leaks but today one spring and lever came completely out of its anchor. Any suggestions? Thanks!
  2. My English Concertina (stagi tenor treble 56 key) lost one of its metal buttons. The lower part broke. Is there any way out there to get a new one? Or is there hope, that the original button can be fixed? I include a picture of the button and a picture of the action I finally managed to open, so you can see, what I need. If everything fails I may use the button of a rarely used note to fill the gap… but of course, I would prefer it to be "really" fixed Any hints? PS: Don't buy this stagi model! Really badly made.
  3. I recently picked up a 38b German bandoneon, cute little thing, on eBay. It needs some work, though the reeds look reasonably good and the action just needs some tweaking, bellows maybe more so. Can anyone recommend anyone (preferably in Europe or North America) who can do bandoneon repair, and who doesn't cost a huge amount for such an inexpensive instrument as I have?
  4. Hello, I'm trying to do some restoration on a small George Jones concertina. It needs alot of work but first up is the non-functioning air button. I think this could be very easy. Here is a picture of the sprung air-button hinge. Perhaps all I need to do is re-glue that leather to the block? Or should I replace that piece of leather hinge altogether? It looks to me like the leather is in still usable shape but kinked from being off for so long. The concertina needs at least 1 pad and has no straps or strap buttons, but I see those readily on eBay. Everything else is there. (slightly off my own topic but the inside of my Wheatstone looks a lot nicer than the George Jones) Chris
  5. Hello Concertina.net concertina gurus. I am the proud owner of a Crane duet, Wheatstone, with a Salvation Army tag. The box itself is rosewood I believe with brown leather bellows, somebody at SA decided it should be their favorite color: um "black"... and has done a rather poor job of refinishing the instrument. Ah but here's the quirk - it only has 35 buttons, but the right side highest accidental key on the top left row, normally Eb, is instead a clearly in tune "A" note. This gives the player a final high A note to complete the A minor scale. I wonder if this was by design/request, or just an accident of construction/restoration?
  6. This thread is intended for folks like me: total concertina newbies who have recently gotten a Jackie from Concertina Connection. While this box has a good sound and plays easily enough, it does have some durability issues that will manifest themselves after a relatively short time. I've had mine about 2 weeks now, probably putting about 30 hours on it, and already I've had to open it up twice. I suspect that I'm not alone in this, so I'm posting this to give some confidence to those who are afraid to do their own minor repairs. First off, check out this video by Daddy Long Les where he's got his Jackie taken apart. This will show you what's inside better than I can explain it. Now that you're familiar with the general anatomy, here are key details: DO NOT OVER-TIGHTEN THE SCREWS. The wood is all very soft so there's a real threat of stripping threads. USE THE CORRECT SIZE OF SCREWDRIVER. The screw metal is very soft so there's a real threat of wallowing out the heads if your screwdriver is the wrong size or not applied forcefully enough down into the screw. The concertina consists of 3 main assemblies: the central bellows and the 2 nearly identical end assemblies. The end assemblies are each attached to the bellows by 6 small Philips screws and washers, and come off the bellows as unitsWhen reassembling the ends to bellows, fasten the screws as you would the lug nuts on a car tire, in a star pattern working them all slightly tighter over several sequences. This is to make sure the end fits evenly and snugly on the bellows. Otherwise you get air leaks through the joint and the concertina won't play well or at all. The end assemblies consist of 2 major parts held together by 2 tiny Philips screws on the underside: The outer black end cap to which the strap and rest are attached The action, which consists of the reeds, valves, buttons, springs, and rocker arms all mounted on 1 big mass of various wood pieces all glued together. Just undo the 2 tiny screws enough to separate the end cap from the action, without removing the screws from the action. This helps prevent losing them. Without the end cap attached, the buttons are free to wobble around and have a tendency to fall off their rocker arms, have their tails come out of their holes, and otherwise not be where they should be. This makes reassembling the end cap to the action a frustrating, fiddly process, the most difficult single thing in the whole process. Fortunately, the buttons all seem to be identical so if several fall completely off, it shouldn't matter which rocker you put them back on. The ends of the thumb straps are held in place by a knob that screws into the edge of the end cap. To adjust the strap, unscrew and remove this knob, stick it through a different hole in the strap, and screw it back into the end cap. TOOLS: Jewelers Philips screwdrivers of several sizes Needlenose pliers Tweezers Magnifying lens or glasses (depending on your eyesight) Lok-Tite or similar product to keep nuts on bolts COMMON PROBLEMS 1. Straps or Rests Coming Loose The straps and rests are attached to the end caps by tiny countersunk Philips screws with nuts and washers on the inside. These nuts tend to loosen or come off completely. When the nuts come off, they will rattle around inside the action but can be shaken out the sound holes. Be careful not to lose them. To fix: Remove the end with the loose part from the bellows. Remove the end cap from the action. Reassemble the strap/rest fasteners using Lok-Tite. While you're in there, tighten up and apply Lok-Tite to all other strap/rest fasteners so you don't have to do this again. Getting a screwdriver on the strap screws will require unscrewing the strap-adjustment knob. 2. Stretching Straps The thumb straps are made from some very cheap fake leather, basically a roll of vinyl with some spongy white fabric inside. This quickly stretches, especially if you play with the concertina on your knee and only move 1 end of it routinely. If you're already on the last hole provided and the strap is too loose, poke a new hole with an ice pick. You don't want or need a very big hole because the strap knob's shaft is only a couple millimeters wide. OTHER POINTS The rocker arms can easily pivot side-to-side as well as up-and-down. Thus, when finagling the buttons into proper formation for reassembling the end cap to the action, it's possible that pushing a button sideways will push its valve the same amount in the opposite direction, which can cause the valve not to completely cover its hole. So before putting the cap back on, be sure all the valves are properly covering their holes. Once you've managed to get the end cap back over all the buttons at once and have the action seated fully into the end cap, you can no longer see any of the action nor even the holes and valves. Therefore, before screwing the end cap back onto the action, test each button for proper springiness. If it springs back up and stays straight, then it's on its rocker arm OK and all SHOULD be well (unless you've moved a valve sideways, which you can't see). If the button has no spring, then you have to take the end cap back off and put the button back on its rocker arm. It's a good idea to only remove 1 end assembly from the bellows at a time. This way, you can be sure you put the end back on the bellows with the same orientation as before. This is important because the screw holes don't line up if you've rotated the end assembly relative to the bellows. If you must remove both ends at once, apply some masking tape to the bellows ends where the thumb straps go, so you can properly orient the end assemblies when you put them back on. Also write on the masking tape which end is left and right. As mentioned above, make sure there are no gaps between the end assembly and the bellows. When reattaching the end assembly, get all the screws in the end assembly until their tips are flush with the bottom of the end cap before placing the assembly on the bellows. Make sure the end cap is oriented correctly and then partially tighten all the screws in a star pattern as with lug nuts until fully seated.
  7. Hey! I'm new here and a very wet being the ears player, I've been learning anglo for nearly a year now on a secondhand scholer (cue sounds of fainted bodies hitting the floor), but am absolutely in love with this instrument, and harbouring a bit of a silly pipedream about learning to build or at least repair them one day. It seems a bti of a difficult world to get into though, Does anybody have any advice on how I might get into learning short of travelling to Castelfidardo for some years? I live in north wales now and the nearest concertina maker seems to be in Newport. I am trying to learn a few thigns just by messing about with the ones I have (sort of a necessity when it breaks every month nowadays), but since I think they are built differently to most concertinas I guess that's not much use. Any advice? Do apprenticeships run anywhere? Google's brought up nothing.
  8. REASON FOR ATTEMPTING 3D PRINTING OF A CONCERTINA Concertinas are too expensive because of complexity and difficulty of manufacture and repair, etc. So I've decided to start 3D printing parts to create a better kind of 'people's' concertina - it's the start of my Concertina Nova project. It's explorative - 'may take years, but the aims are: - use 3D printing to experimentally revise the form of the concertina for better ergonomics and easier playing, yet still good sound - to 'democratize' the concertina by making it available as a cheap, robust instrument at 'guitar prices' - make them so popular that they'll be seen round every campfire and at every party, in harmony with guitars and voices. ACTION Tomorrow I'm paying a local engineering firm, Absolute TOoling Solutions, to copy- 3D-print the outer ends of my tenor-treble, with - non-conical holes so the buttons won't wiggle - pinholes for ventilation, to reduce the glaring loudness while still allowing air flow. That experiment will cost me $400. It gets me - alternative end pieces for my concertina - CAD drawings I need for future redos (probably using my own 3D printer later) SEE THE CURRENT DRAFT REQUIREMENTS SPECIFICATION OF THE CONCERTINA NOVA https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B-4satLcOAKGNnRjNE5SNW03UXc/view?usp=sharing SEE THE 3D PRINTERS AVAILABLE IN NEW ZEALAND I may be buying a 3D printer myself, perhaps the one shown at.. http://diamondage.co.nz/product/moa-3d-printer/ because it can 3D print itself and I might create others to use or sell. Bruce (Tomo) Thomson 20 Lyndhurst St. Chelwood Village, Palmerston North, New Zealand 06 357 7773 021 176 9711 palmytomo@gmail.com
  9. Hi, So... I have an important gig tomorrow and my concertina has decided to play up and I'm not sure how to fix it. Normally, I would be able to do these things myself but I can't figure out the problem and my copy of David Elliott's book has conveniently disappeared... The problem is that when you play the G# on the push, and then stop pressing the key, it still sounds quietly until you change the direction of the bellows. My main questions are: 1) What is wrong? 2) Is it fixable by my? 3) How do I fix it?! It would be great if someone could get back to me ASAP! Thank you! Andy
  10. I have been asked to restore a Rock Chidley English Concertina that is in very poor condition. Nothing unusual there, but when I undid the screws on one end the action did not lift off as you would expect it to. So I started gently leavering, and found that the reed pan was coming out with it. On finally extracting the whole I saw the arrangement shown in the attached photo. Somebody had screwed the reed pan to the bottom of the action board. Has anybody ever seen such a thing? Why would anybody do this? Amazing what people do. Perhaps we should start the NSPCC, i.e. the National Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Concertinas! By the way, no serial number was visible anywhere on the instrument, only the "Rock Chidley" stamp on the action boards. Did he often make them with no serial number?
  11. The cheap concertinas that I have (old Bastari) are made using plywood. I don't have the idea that using a different wood would have any appreciable change in the sound on them, but does the wood on the better concertinas have any affect on the sound? I seem to remember noticing that the reed plate in one of the pictures seemed to be beech. Does type of wood have as much difference on a concertina as it does in a guitar or a violin? Terrence PS. I just found the thread from 2006 discussing tonewoods. Additional information, though, would be welcome.
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