Jump to content

Chris Ghent

Members
  • Posts

    1,386
  • Joined

  • Last visited

2 Followers

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://www.chrisghentconcertinas.au

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Not Telling
  • Location
    Blue Mountains NSW

Recent Profile Visitors

5,003 profile views

Chris Ghent's Achievements

Heavyweight Boxer

Heavyweight Boxer (5/6)

  1. Tom, I don’t understand the meaning of pressure “differential”. Some time ago I spent time gauging the starting vacuum of reeds as a way to producing more efficient reeds. In the tuning rig (which has a variable voltage fan and two magnehelic gauges, one a 0 to .5”) I found reeds needed to start at less than .1” WC to be efficient. The full power of the rig peaks at 1.6”WC which I use as a tuning -pressure. I no longer use this starting assessment method because I know what I need to do to achieve that result and see no need to check it every time. Consequently when the operating pressure in the bellows (I drilled a hole in the bellows frame and sealed a tube into it) turned out to be less than .1 I was a little surprised but accepted it. It was easy to create -pressure of many inches in the bellows but as soon as I pressed a button it dropped away to almost nothing. I’m not saying you are wrong, more that our experiences must be complimentary in some way and I don’t know what that way is. Happy to be wrong myself. Cheers Chris
  2. Tom, I don’t understand the meaning of pressure “differential”. Some time ago I spent time gauging the starting vacuum of reeds as a way to producing more efficient reeds. In the tuning rig (which has a variable voltage fan and two magnehelic gauges, one a 0 to .5”) I found reeds needed to start at less than .1” WC to be efficient. The full power of the rig peaks at 1.6”WC which I use as a tuning -pressure. I no longer use this starting assessment method because I know what I need to do to achieve that result and see no need to check it every time. Consequently when the operating pressure in the bellows (I drilled a hole in the bellows frame and sealed a tube into it) turned out to be less than .1 I was a little surprised but accepted it. It was easy to create -pressure of many inches in the bellows but as soon as I pressed a button it dropped away to almost nothing. I’m not saying you are wrong, more that our experiences must be complimentary in some way and I don’t know what that way is. Cheers Chris
  3. I had an early instrument converted to Hall effect midi and it is not perfect but it is a huge amount of fun. It has a pressure sensor inside for volume, which works reasonably. I don’t doubt it could be done better but that will come. The instrument represented, the key and the octave can be shifted by button press. The thrill of sounding like a large church organ is endless. My major issue with it is it cannot distinguish between a tipped button and a fully pushed button. If ever the concertina became a fashionable instrument again it will not be through an old fusty playing a 1926 Aeola, it will be a young thing with a midi made of something fantastic with flashing lights. All power to them.
  4. Years ago I connected a magnehelic gauge to a bellows and was amazed to find the operating pressure inside was minimal. By memory it was .025” water column. The force applied to fingertips should be no more than about 60 grams times the number of buttons pushed and is separate to the pushing or pulling action. It will be there whether pushing the bellows or pulling. I think I would ignore it. You would only need to fit your gadget to the active end of the concertina. However there are many different ways people hold an anglo and simple pressure in and out on the handrest leads to waggle in the bellows leading to more complex ways of holding and bracing the movement.
  5. A job well done Dana! If anyone has not seen inside one of Dana’s concertinas, there is a lot of lovely well thought out engineering in there. And thanks Dana for all of the good sense you put my way over the years. And the great company on our many phone calls..!
  6. I find carefully lifting the end off the action box, making sure the end is perfectly positioned and lifting vertically so as to not disturb any of the buttons or the pads, will show you where the pads are positioned on the pad board. Only works with a concertina that has inscribed circles around the pads as an alignment guide. When I made concertinas without such a circle I would put a dot in the centre of the pad so the alignment could be gauged from underneath. These alignment methods only work in conjunction with oads in good condition and no extraneous matter caught underneath.
  7. I find .5mm a little thin for gussets. I think there is a chance if they are too thin they will absorb some of abruptness of a bellows change by moving slightly. .7, even .8 sounds right.
  8. Having only one C# compromises your phrasing occasionally in the same way as does the single F# on the left. Having the high A on the push more handily placed is a bonus but it is there on the Jeffries layout, at the end of the row.
  9. If you are using any chemical method and the brass is starting to look a little pink it means the zinc is leaching out and leaving the copper behind.
  10. I have always found the description of concertina tone/timbre difficult. One way I have found of assessing and demonstrating differences in concertina sound is as follows. This is a comparative method. What you do is play a note on one of the concertinas and mimic its sound with your voice. While still singing the note, play the same note on the other concertina and adapt your voice to the new note. You will find (if there was a difference) you need to change the shape of your mouth/throat to mimic the new note. This change is mostly a matter of the size of the mouth/throat chamber. I have surmised the need for a bigger mouth chamber means the lower harmonics dominate and a smaller chamber means the upper harmonics dominate.
  11. Bellows which open by themselves are unfinished. They need to spend time ( I don’t mean ten minutes, I mean at least a couple of weeks, preferably more) firmly clamped up, and being taken out every few days and stretched and then clamped again. And then when they go into service they should be immediately put away in a blocked case when not being used. After a period of time, when they have given up resisting you can be a little more relaxed about it. There is a sweet spot between bellows that are too floppy and bellows that are too tight. In that sweet spot are a lot of good concertinas. Bellows can be stiff for a bunch of reasons. Anything with folded cards will be stiffer. However, a lot of people who say “the bellows on this concertina are too stiff” are actually having to push harder to compensate for the inefficient nature of poor reeds.
  12. A feeler gauge of around 6-8 thou is a good tool. Around here there are two types of feeler gauge, parallel with a rounded end and tapered with a round end. The tapered ones are best.
  13. Very different playing styles Lukasz. I use the style you describe on my B/C accordion.
×
×
  • Create New...