Jump to content
robert stewart

Humidification packs for instruments

Recommended Posts

Does anyone have experience using humidification gel packs for keeping a concertina stable? They are usually used

for other wooden instruments (which also have, of course, metal parts). Typical example here:

https://www.daddario.com/products/accessories/humidification/automatic-humidipak/

 

What is interesting with these is that they are supposedly to keep a stable humidity of 40-45% inside a case. If humidity is high

they draw it in. If low, they emit some humidity. Here in the northern panhandle of West Virginia humidity rises high, then suddenly drops low,

often within a very short time. Depends on....everything.

 

Robert

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My cases both have accessory pockets, so I use the D’addario small instrument humidifier with a small sponge that I dampen. I also use their Humiditrak. With its app it tells me temperature and humidity inside the case. Also has a setting for shock sensor. Because I never check my concertinas I don’t that feature. You can browse by hourly, daily or monthly history as well as current. I have set alarms if temperature extremes occur ( think in the trunk of a car ). My humidity is always 50-55%

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it possible to check and calibrate the Humiditrak?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't believe so. It is connected to th phone via bluetooth, and no calibration option listed. Only set points for low and high.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Such a thing was suggested to me by a chemist about 25 years ago.  I expect they would work fine as long as their capacity wasn’t being challenged by leaving the case open for long periods in high humidity or low.  Changing humidity is often more of a problem than  keeping a moderate level.  Thin wood dries at a much faster rate than it can reabsorb moisture.  For things like violins, this can cause playing problems and become balky until the wood stabilizes somewhat.  Concertinas aren’t as vulnerable, but cracks or loose reed shoes ( or jammed ones ) can result over a period of days from prolonged exposure to a very dry or humid environment.  45 to 50 % RH is a good middle ground, and I think would make a happy home for your box.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's my high-tech solution to the problem. Would drilling more holes in the top add Bluetooth capability?

 

P_20200115_055854.thumb.jpg.b8201659210caf9f3dedbcb3d759ab3a.jpg

Edited by lachenal74693

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have not spotted how these gel packs work, if the are to keep humanity stable, they need to be able to add and remove moisture. The other thought is that most of the old instruments were made in the UK,  our humidity is a lot damper  than 45%,  65% is more the norm.

 

Dave 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/15/2020 at 7:45 PM, d.elliott said:

The other thought is that most of the old instruments were made in the UK,  our humidity is a lot damper  than 45%,  65% is more the norm.

It is no longer a question but an established fact that many aspects of any specific culture are determined more by the climate than by the ethnicity, religion or political structure of its people. And the concertina is very much a part of British Isles culture.

Cheers,

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

John, 

 

what on earth are you talking about?  I am talking about humidity, people are trying to maintain instruments at 45% RH, I am pointing out that the concertinas were made in the UK where the humidity is far higher. Nothing to do with cultural ethnicity. They should probably be be trying for, say,  65% to 80% RH to prevent shrinkage of woods.

 

I am afraid you have left me entirely puzzled, not that puzzlement is difficult to achieve in my situation.

 

 

Edited by d.elliott

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, d.elliott said:

They should probably be be trying for, say,  65% to 80% RH to prevent shrinkage of woods.

 

80% sounds high to me; if you over-humidify there's a risk of encouraging mould and rust. Note that temperature variation can cause a problem too, if you keep it in a room that is intermittently heated/cooled. Room heats up, relative humidity falls, humidifier gives out moisture into the air; room cools down, relative humidity rises, excess moisture condenses out of the air onto the instrument and the case lining.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...