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Posted (edited)

Hi, I recently purchased a Lachenal EC which needs a bit of restoration and tuning. I am unable to remove the reed pan from the bellows frame on both ends; it feels as if someone has glued the reed pans to the frames... Anyone knows a possible reason a solution for this? It’d be very helpful. 

 

 

Edited by rcr27

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That does not sound good.  Presumably somebody thought that this would seal any leakage around the edges of the reed pan.

 

Is the chamois leather lining still in place around the inside of the ends?  Hopefully so, because then you may be able to carefully detach the reed pan from the ends taking the chamois leather out with it.  In this case, you could try very carefully cutting through just the chamois in the hope that you can then pull the reed pan free.  Or you could try wetting the chamois so that the water soluble glue attaching it to the bellows frame will release and let you pull out the reed pan.  Either way you have a clean-up job on the reed pan and you will have to replace the chamois lining/gasket.  Use a water-soluble glue when you replace the chamois gasket.

 

If they have glued the reed pan directly onto the wood on the inside of the ends  then you have a real problem.  You might be able to use an oscillating tool (aka Fein tool) with a thin knife blade to shear through the glue without causing unrepairable damage.

 

But do not follow any of my suggestions until some real experts chime in here, also pictures would help a lot to assess what you can do.

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Posted (edited)

Thanks for your suggestion. Im unsure about the chamois leather, but I will take a picture of it tomorrow. There isn’t really any signs of glue whatsoever, but I can’t find any other explanation. 

Edited by rcr27

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It could be that it is a really tight fit (which is good) that has not been disturbed for years and maybe the wood has also swelled a little with humidity.

 

How agressive have you been in trying to pull them out?  If you do manage to get them out then Geoff Crabb recommends using a little unscented talcum powder to ease their travels in the future.

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At first I just tried to pull it in a gentle way just like anyone would do, but then after realising that it didn’t come out I applied more pressure and still didn’t come out. I don’t really want to be very aggressive as I’m afraid I could brake the woodwork or the chambers. The concertina itself has old pads, old and dusty lever arm spring , old valves... it seems that It’s never been restored before. It’s s a steel reeded Paragon model circa 1908. It has a crack on one end too, so it’s definitely not been well looked after. 

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I doubt the pans on my Lachenal Crane had been out since 1920 something.  One of 'my finger' or the pan was going to give first.  Eventually it was the pan/s, and boy they let go with some vigour.  I was amazed at how much 'energy' was required to get them to budge.  If I had pulled in a gentle way like anyone would do I would still be pulling now !

 

The bottom line seemed to be that the 'fulsome' napped chamois 'above' where the pan sat - and had sat for the best part of a century had to be overcome to get it moving.  That part where they rested was greatly compressed compared to that around the rim of the frame.

 

The marvels of the original concept /design / materials.

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I have been facing similar problems with my model 24 but was encouraged in these forums to support as much of the narrower side (on top, where the smaler reeds are located) as possible with the index finger from underneath when pulling - and it did work for me.

 

Best wishes - 🐺

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I have a potentially rather nice 'tina with glued-in reed pans - haven't yet figured out a way of releasing them - but then the 'tina is some way down the resto pile so may get around to it someday.

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As a last resort if they really are glued in permanently, it would be easier to make new bellows frames than new reed pans. A competent restorer could carefully cut the bellows off, remove the nut plates, destroy the frames to remove them, sand the glue off the edges of the pans, then build new frames to fit the pans, new chamois, drill and tap new nut plates, reattach the bellows (or new ones), etc. Quite a bit of work but if it's a nice instrument it would be worth it.

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Here is a post that is somehow related...

 

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(Sorry for the late reply). God it was a tough one... hopefully it wasn’t glued, but it just seems that this concertina has never been opened before since it was manufactured. 

 

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