Jump to content

Really a Crabb?


nkgibbs
 Share

Recommended Posts

6 hours ago, mdarnton said:

Did Crabb ever make this kind of junk?

 

Even basic Lachenals (Mahogany Anglos) don‘t necessarily deserve this disparaging label, and fellow concertinists with just one of these (not me, as I own TOTL instruments as well) shouldn’t be told they’re playing with „junk“ IMO. It‘s simply not true either...

 

Edited by Wolf Molkentin
typo
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/28/2018 at 6:45 AM, Wolf Molkentin said:

 

Even basic Lachenals (Mahogany Anglos) don‘t necessarily deserve this disparaging label, and fellow concertinists with just one of these (not me, as I own TOTL instruments as well) shouldn’t be told they’re playing with „junk“ IMO. It‘s simply not true either...

 

 

You beat me to it - absolutely - I won't be paying any attention to Darnton's posts in the future - they

are clearly garbage - I have at least 2 Lachenals which are very, very good indeed.

 

Roger

Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 minutes ago, mdarnton said:

Uh, for the record here, I did NOT say Lachenals are garbage. That's what I play, myself.

 

I'm aware of that, you hadn't been talking about higher-end Lachenals (such as my Excelsior, or an Edeo, or New Model), but of

 

On 11/28/2018 at 1:35 AM, mdarnton said:

a bottom end Lachanel student model

 

- and admittedly I'm not even familiar with these "student" ECs.

 

This is why I referred to the "bottom-end" Anglos. I have and play a typical 20b Anglo (and funnily a very similar Crabb too, see link above), and they're clearly not junk, or crap, or garbage, or toys, but musical instruments. However, I would extend this experience or statement to the EC (or Duet) learner instruments as well, and I have frequently been taking offense at these pejorative ways of talking, it's not just you - but your post jumped out at me.

 

Best wishes - ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Probably Lachenal but could be Wheatstone as that style of routed fretwork pattern and the coloured, lettered buttons can be found on English models of a both makers at various earlier times. An internal serial number, if present, may indicate the origin.

The H Crabb & Son label indicates that the instrument would have been refurbished/supplied at some time after 1936 and would have been used where the original makers/dealers label was missing or beyond re-use (mutilated). The ever important  wording on the Crabb label, 'Concertina Makers', does not imply the subject instrument as being made in the Crabb workshop.

It is expected that instruments of Crabb manufacture will have a Crabb four (8*** on) or five (10*** on) digit ID number present internally and/or externally.

Exceptions, however, may be found i.e. 1. No number.   2. Some 'odd' external number.

 1. Early instruments supplied to C Jeffries pre-1895 only had numbers pencilled internally and these were often erased between collection and final delivery to a customer. After 1895 all Crabb numbers were impressed into the internal woodwork.

 2. While some dealers/wholesalers would request there own name/numbers to be applied externally, a Crabb stamp & number would always be impressed internally.

 

Geoff.

 

Edited by Geoffrey Crabb
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...