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Jewish Leprechaun

Need some help, Pairing a tune with Scarborough Fair

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Alrighty, I could use some input.  So I want one or two tunes to launch into after Scarborough Fair (open to any suggestions reels, jigs, etc.)

One tune set I've heard played at sessions is Star of the county down (it'll be sung) and then afterwards everyone launches into Cooley's Reel and then Rakish Paddy.  I'm looking for something along those lines (yes I know SOTCD is a barn dance followed by reels while Scarborough Fair is a waltz followed by... )

-Lep

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OK. Looking for tunes harmonically similar and rhythmically different, then.

A Fig for a Kiss? Aileen Og? The Dancing of the Sheets? 

Daniel 

 

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I really like the sound of Fig for a Kiss.  I can't find any music (tried youtubing them and the session) for Aileen Og or the Dancing of the Sheets though.  Perhaps alternative names for them? 

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Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, Jewish Leprechaun said:

...So I want one or two tunes to launch into after Scarborough Fair (open to any suggestions reels, jigs, etc.)...

It may well go beyond the scope of your initial query, but there was a thread on 'Session Sets' on melodeon.net
a while back. It might be worth looking there for ideas? See:

https://forum.melodeon.net/index.php/topic,21574.0.html

Edited by lachenal74693

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7 hours ago, Jewish Leprechaun said:

I really like the sound of Fig for a Kiss.  I can't find any music (tried youtubing them and the session)

I'm pretty sure there are ABC versions available on Lester Bailey's huge melodeon.net ABC file:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/ej3b7l3vs5sgpkg/melnets_big_abc_ file.abc?dl=0

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I might fancy a bit of a contrast here - start with a restful Scarborough Fair and then break into the frenzy of Drowsy Maggie. Works quite well for me, playing them (with my tenor treble English) both in the key of E Dorian (as usual for the latter, whereas the former seems to be commonly played on the root of D, and in my treble version on A). I guess A Dorian to E Dorian (or similar) might work too.

What do you think?

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Eileen Og (or Oge) is found in The Session as Pride of Petravore. A composed song, you'll find multiple versions on YouTube. 

I couldn't find The Dancing of the Sheets in Google, either.  It appears that "Dancing IN the Sheets" is some big popular song.  I'll work on this - it's a song about the Black Plague (lots of fun!) and has a fine melody.  I've known the tune forever and don't know where to find it... 

Daniel 

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The proper title is Shaking of the Sheets, recorded by Steel Eye Span.  The lyrics begin:

Dance, dance the shaking of the sheets,

Dance, dance when you hear the piper. 

I've attached the music from www.thedancemacabe.org.  The music is written "square" but is played with a strong swing like a hornpipe. 

Daniel 

20180520_091748.png

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Haha well now I think I'm torn between Drowsy Maggie and Fig for a Kiss.  I guess I'll just have to rotate between the two 😄

 

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Scarborough Fair is an ENGLISH TUNE. Why on Earth mix it with Irish tunes. Look at English Country Dance Tunes or Playford or even some of the tunes in Folk Songs from Florida. Please respect the Tradition and do not merge it into an amorphous World Music Mush 

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, OLDNICKILBY said:

Scarborough Fair is an ENGLISH TUNE. Why on Earth mix it with Irish tunes. Look at English Country Dance Tunes or Playford or even some of the tunes in Folk Songs from Florida. Please respect the Tradition and do not merge it into an amorphous World Music Mush 

Hi Nick,

I'm not sure if the kind of respect you're claiming here is realistic. Few of us play in a traditional style in any stricter sense. Ornamentation f.i. is rather personal and not according to particular (unwritten) rules. So couldn't merging an English with an Irish tune rather be regarded as a matter of personal candor...?

N.B. I greatly respect and appreciate the keepers of traditions, whereever the "folk process" may lead them. OTOH the omnipresent "balfolk" genre (how ever attractive to the dancers) is not to my liking in terms of the music as the beauty of distinct tunes seems too much be getting in the rear this way.

But pairing two tunes I (or any fellow player) truly love (and thus am able and inclined to let shine) should not be discounted as evil or worthless or offending IMO.

Best wishes - Wolf

Edited by Wolf Molkentin
typo
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Our audiences are our musical partners as well, and few members here would recognize the unmixed ITM session if it were presented. They will be happy to hear Scarborough Fair, and may enjoy the less familiar Drowsy Maggie and Fig for a Kiss as well. 

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2 hours ago, OLDNICKILBY said:

Scarborough Fair is an ENGLISH TUNE. Why on Earth mix it with Irish tunes. Look at English Country Dance Tunes or Playford or even some of the tunes in Folk Songs from Florida. Please respect the Tradition and do not merge it into an amorphous World Music Mush 

You are the ghost of Ewan Macoll and I claim my 5 pounds!

Don.

(Actually, I do agree with Owd Nick).

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We ,collectively, are the carriers of our oral and aural traditions. It therefore behoves , each and everyone of us, to nuture and foster the knowledge and respect for that History. Like any language whether it be English, French, German or Urdu it is a Grade One  A Star listed Building. It is incumbent on us to help with the education of Musically semi-literate audiences. It is Music not Bloody Muzak

Don

The Cash is in the Post( Will it get through Canadian Customs though M'Duck?)

Pounds 5 Pounds is a good song  and well worth a look and a listen

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59 minutes ago, OLDNICKILBY said:

We ,collectively, are the carriers of our oral and aural traditions. It therefore behoves , each and everyone of us, to nuture and foster the knowledge and respect for that History. Like any language whether it be English, French, German or Urdu it is a Grade One  A Star listed Building. It is incumbent on us to help with the education of Musically semi-literate audiences. It is Music not Bloody Muzak

I can only repeat myself, however deem that necessary here:

Your argument, Nick, should exclude 90 % or more of active folkies, as they are not acting and playing strictly according to the respective traditions. Would you opt for controlling the quality or honesty of any folk musician? their knowledgeability?

Apart from that, and again without any preference for "world" hotchpotches on my side, who are you, or we, or anyone, to rule over purity vs. cross-fertilisation or invention or simply personal taste?

Not a path to take IMO...

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one more thing: "bloody muzak" is generally  and rightfully disrespected for being soulless, that's what I've been presuming that is

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, OLDNICKILBY said:

We ,collectively, are the carriers of our oral and aural traditions. It therefore behoves , each and everyone of us, to nuture and foster the knowledge and respect for that History. Like any language whether it be English, French, German or Urdu it is a Grade One  A Star listed Building. It is incumbent on us to help with the education of Musically semi-literate audiences. It is Music not Bloody Muzak

 

So, to paraphrase you:

1. I, having been born and raised in Germany, am not allowed to listen to, let alone actively engage in, folk music and traditions of other people (for example not English although 90% of my active repertoire consists of traditional English Folk) and are obliged to stick to wherever I was arbitrarily born into?

2. The folk ensemble I am a member of that is committed to bringing people together and help them understanding each other by embracing folk cultures all over the world is wrong (their repertoire contains music from South America, Asia, the Near East, Europe, Scandinavia, America, Russia and so much more)?

3. There should not be Morris dance groups or bagpipe societies outside the UK (or strictly speaking only parts of it)?

4. All the worldwide choirs, folk dance groups and bands that are open minded enough to enjoy music from many places around the worlds are illegal and should be forbidded or dismantled?

5. Music like this here should not exist?

I am asking in this provocative manner because I'm sure I habe misinterpreted your post (I can't believe anybody these days is as backwards as the post insinuates).

Thanks!

Edited by RAc

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How about pairing it with John Kirkpatrick's As the sun was setting? Similar feel to both - I think they would blend well.

Whilst I'm no purist myself, I have some sympathy with Old Nic's viewpoint. As it's an English song my first thought would be to look for an English tune to complement it.

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