Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
conzertino

Golden Aeolas

Recommended Posts

There is an interesting Amboyna and gold-plated Aeola baritone ( 35061 ) at ebay right now ( from Australia ):

 

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/141805358721?pb=14&&autorefresh=true

 

I happen to own another Amboyna and gold plated Aeola baritone ( 32915 ). Mine is 64 key, down to F!

 

I know of one other Gold-plated Aeola baritone, which was done up and replated by Wim Wacker. Originally that one was "gilded".

 

And of course there is Alf Edward's Aeola with gilded bellows!

 

Has anyone come across any other gold-plated Aeolas? I have seen gold-plated Edeophones...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A newer shot of the Faire Four Sister's concertinas in the hands of Aldbury Morris Men

 

all_gold_1.jpg

Edited by Lester Bailey

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A newer shot of the Faire Four Sister's melodeons in the hands of Aldbury Morris Men

 

all_gold_1.jpg

 

"Melodeons"? Ooh, Lester! ;)

 

And if I remember correctly, those are decorated with gilt paint, not real gold plate. Yes? Nice, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is an interesting Amboyna and gold-plated Aeola baritone ( 35061 ) at ebay right now ( from Australia ):

 

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/141805358721?pb=14&&autorefresh=true

 

I happen to own another Amboyna and gold plated Aeola baritone ( 32915 ). Mine is 64 key, down to F!

Down to F, you say. So is it a standard baritone, which would put that low F in the left hand, or a baritone-treble, with that low F in the right hand?

 

I know of one other Gold-plated Aeola baritone, which was done up and replated by Wim Wacker. Originally that one was "gilded".

 

And of course there is Alf Edward's Aeola with gilded bellows!

 

Has anyone come across any other gold-plated Aeolas? I have seen gold-plated Edeophones...

I remember a gold-plated Aeola at the 1999 Bielefeld weekend. Belonged to a woman. Is that one of the ones you've already mentioned?

 

And I once heard of a gold-plated concertina in the American Midwest. (Michigan? Wisconsin? I forget. That would have been in the late 1970s.) I was told that its lowest note was an E, but no more about the layout. My memory seems to picture it as English and 8-sided, but I don't remember whether that was stated or just my own mental picture. There were no photos provided at the time, and I never heard more about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

A newer shot of the Faire Four Sister's melodeons in the hands of Aldbury Morris Men

 

 

 

"Melodeons"? Ooh, Lester! ;)

 

And if I remember correctly, those are decorated with gilt paint, not real gold plate. Yes? Nice, though.

 

Oppps :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sure I wouldn't go anywhere near my Aeolas with gold paint :o

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sure I wouldn't go anywhere near my Aeolas with gold paint :o

It was Wheatstone that painted them as a special order for the Fair Four Sisters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jim, mine has the F and F# on the left side as expected...

 

It is late 32xxx, but has the old label and riveted action.

 

post-7162-0-48535100-1445673824_thumb.jpg

 

It is the one that you saw in Bielefeld!

Edited by conzertino

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jim, mine has the F and F# on the left side as expected...

 

It is late 32xxx, but has the old label and riveted action.

 

attachicon.gifGoldie.jpg

 

It is the one that you saw in Bielefeld!

 

Is there any significant difference in sound from a similar instrument with nickel-plated ends?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, there isn't really! In fact my 48 key metal-ended Aeola baritone is a little louder and faster - as you would expect from a slightly smaller box.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I interviewed the Fayre Four, they said it was Wheatstone managers the Chidley brothers who suggested their concertinas be gold, as black would be "too funereal" for young ladies to play. These were not gold plated at all--the ends were simply wood stained or painted gold, as were the leather bellows. Originally, the quartet played instruments made by George Jones who also made custom instruments for their father (half of the famous Webb Brothers circus duo). Their Wheatstones were made sometime in the '20s, I believe.

During the mid and later '30s, Wheatstone began making highly ornamented instruments mostly for export sale to South Africa. These had tortoise shell, amboyna wood, or gold-plated ends; gold fittings; and so-called Moroccan leather bellows. I have seen tortoise shell instruments as large as a baritone model.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have seen tortoise shell instruments as large as a baritone model.

 

And I've seen a "tortoise shell" piccolo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I own the gold plated baritone referred to in the OP.

 

It was supposedly commissioned as "one of a pair" by a clown in the circus in Paris in 1912. Originally gilt but completely renovated by Wim Wakker who plated the ends.

 

I remember seeing it on eBay; Chris Algar bought it and went over to Paris to collect it. The information comes from him. However the Wheatstone records don't support the contention that 2 identical baritones were made....serial # 26380

 

It doesn't sound any different from other metal ended baritones I've played but it has that lovely distinctive Wheatstone baritone sound. It is phenomenal to hold and look at and and play.

 

http://www.concertinaconnection.com/rare%20concertinas.htm

 

However, the baritone is not an instrument I have bonded with; I was sure I would. I don't play it enough and would part with it.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting: someone put in a bid of 3.250 shortly before the end - The sniper of a well-known British dealer tried 10 times to come in at the same price, but lost it... In my opinion someone got a bargain!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting: someone put in a bid of 3.250 shortly before the end - The sniper of a well-known British dealer tried 10 times to come in at the same price, but lost it... In my opinion someone got a bargain!

That's about $5000 USD. A bargain? Perhaps. For me the Wheatstone tipping point is around 1934 When they went with hook and arm action and different construction materials. It does not mean they did not produce some excellent instruments post 1934 but all things being equal (except for the gold plate and amboyna) without the opportunity to personally play the instrument I'd prefer taking my chances on a Wheatstone 1900-1914 or 1927-1932 rather than one from the late 1930s.

 

Nonetheless baritone trebles are rare, amboyna gold plated ones rarer and post 1934 but pre-1943 Wheatstone reeds can still be quite good. And Chris Ghent who examined the instrument knows more than something about concertinas and was impressed. So maybe Robert is correct.

 

Greg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Greg

My rosewood Wheatstone Aeola was made in 1937. I agree with your assessment of well made Wheatstones but I really like the tone and especially the action once you worked on it.

rss

Edited by Randy Stein

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...