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9 hours ago, David Barnert said:

The same thing you did on the C row to play the C scale you can do on the G row to play the G scale.

 

7 hours ago, lachenal74693 said:

Like this?

 

I don’t know. I’m not an anglo player. I know what I said is true, but the fine points (like which octave: up a 5th or down a 4th?) are beyond me.

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My understanding/experience is the keys in the name of an anglo concertina or a melodeon/diatonic button accordion are giving lowest key first. So the G row on a C/G anglo is indeed a fifth higher than the C row. Melodeons differ; on my G/C Hohner, the G row is a fourth lower than the C row.

 

If I have omitted "key" details I know others will sort it out for us (as always).

 

Ken

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3 hours ago, David Barnert said:

I don’t know. I’m not an anglo player. I know what I said is true, but the fine points (like which octave: up a 5th or down a 4th?) are beyond me.

Oops! Sorry. I didn't mean to confuse you (if that is indeed what I did). The picture was intended to reinforce

what you said about the fingering for the scale of G being the same on the G-row as the fingering for the scale

of C on the C-row. Apart from the 'g', the fingering is the same for each key...

Edited by lachenal74693
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13 minutes ago, lachenal74693 said:

The picture was intended to reinforce

what you said about the fingering for the scale of G being the same on the G-row as the fingering for the scale

of C on the C-row.

 

Thanks. I knew it was either that or you were sarcastically trying to point out that I had said something really ignorant. 🤪

 

15 minutes ago, lachenal74693 said:

Apart from the 'g', the fingering is the same for each key

 

I have no idea what the ‘g’ means. I know even less about anglo tab than I do about anglo concertinas. I would think it just means “play on the G row,” but but then the fingering would be identical, and why is there no ‘c’ for the other row? 🤔

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On a 20 button, you only have the notes for 2 major scales, in your case, C major and G major.

 

However, there are many routes through the maze.  For the part of the range that is typically used for melody, every note appears twice except the F natural (on the C row) and the F sharp (on the G row).

 

Therefore, there are many many theoretical ways of playing each of those two major scales.

 

The first way to branch out is cross row scales in C.  Common tricks are to borrow some or all of the following notes from the right hand G row: G A B C D E

 

It is also occasionally useful to borrow some of C D E from the left hand of the G row.

 

Later, try playing in G, but borrowing the lower C D E (below the tonic) from the right hand C row.

 

You cannot make complete major scales of other keys on a G row because the sharps or flats are not available.

 

However, you can play in some of the other modes: basically the same scale, but starting and finishing on a different note. For example, many folk tunes are in a mode that uses only the notes of C major, but uses D as the tonic.

 

I have never memorised the Greek names of the modes, but I think it's called Myxomatosis, or Friggin' or something.🙃

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3 hours ago, David Barnert said:

1) Thanks. I knew it was either that or you were sarcastically trying to point out that I had said something really ignorant. 🤪

 

2) I have no idea what the ‘g’ means. I know even less about anglo tab than I do about anglo concertinas. I would think it just means “play on the G row,” but but then the fingering would be identical, and why is there no ‘c’ for the other row? 🤔

1) Not at all. I should have explained a little more...

2) Precisely. There is no 'c' because it's not 'necessary' - absence of a prefix simply means 'play on the home

row'. On a 3-row C/G, the rows are prefixed: 'a' (accidental), nothing (home row) and 'g' (g row). It sounds

awkward, but once the idea gets ingrained, this approach transfers easily to G/D and Bb/F Anglo. It works

for me, anyway.

 

I'm sorry for the confusion caused by my assumption that you were an Anglo-er - entirely my fault...

Edited by lachenal74693
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3 hours ago, Mikefule said:

I have never memorised the Greek names of the modes, but I think it's called Myxomatosis, or Friggin' or something.🙃

Thanks! You just brightened my day! I must remember those alternative names...😎

 

It's more than the OP asked for, but there's a (short) section on modal forms of Amin which can be played on

a 20-button C/G on p. 11 of Mick Bramich's Absolute Beginner's Concertina. I don't know what the 'body of the

kirk' thinks about this book, but I found it very helpful when I started. All the tunes in the book are in a simple

tablature (which is effectively the same as used for the scales posted earlier)...

 

The OP did ask for a web site. There are scales given in the 'Exercises' section of this on-line Anglo concertina

tutor. There are several tunes given in each of the 'In Row Tunes' and 'Cross Row Tunes' sections...

 

I progressed from the Bramich books to the Australian system early in my somewhat murky musical career.

Since then, I have used no other...

Edited by lachenal74693
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Remembering mode names: This was given to me in a workshop years ago:

Mnemonic for Remembering Music Modes - I Don't Punch Like Muhammad Ali

When I transcribe a melody I try I like to determine which of the 7 "church" modes it might be using based on the notes I am hearing. There is a mnemonic for remembering these modes - I Don't Punch Like Muhammed Ali.
In other words, that's I (Ionian) Don't (Dorian) Punch (Phrygian) Like (Lydian) Muhammad (Mixolydian) A (Aeolian) li (Locrian).  Since there are two modes that start with L I try and remember that Locrian comes last.  Another one that works is I Don't Play Loud Music Any Longer.

But you probably need this to remind you which is which:

1 – 8 ( Do – Do ) Ionian …………..Major scale

2 – 2 ( Re – Re ) Dorian…….. Minor scale – minor 3rd & 7th, major 6th

3 – 3 ( Mi – Mi ) Phrygian …… Minor scale – minor 3rd, 6th, 7th, & 2nd
4 – 4 ( Fa – Fa ) Lydian ………….Major scale with an augmented 4th

5 – 5 ( So – So ) Mixolydian……...Major scale with a minor 7th

6 – 6 ( La – La ) Aeolian…………. Minor scale – minor 3rd, 6th, 7th
7 – 7 ( Ti – Ti ) Locrian…………..Minor 3rd, 6th, 7th, & 2nd, & a  

                                                        diminished 5th

 

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Even though 20 button’s only completely cover the 2 major keys and their relative minors (Amin and E min for a c/g), you can still play a lot of tunes in D for instance which is only missing the c#.  Some tunes really can’t do without that note, but for many others, you can simply  hold the previous note or substitute an ornament or chord for the duration of the c#.  In Irish trad music, there are a lot of D tunes that leave out the C# presumably because they were composed on instruments that are like harps without sharping levers or one row melodions.  Some great players like Jacqueline McCarthy played on 2 row C/Gs.  Also, and I expect for similar reasons, Irish music is full of tunes that are “modal” and sound like they should be in D, but partake in the key of C (one whole tone down ) when a C# isn’t available.  This mode is so much a part of ITM, that you won’t ever run out of “D”tunes.  The same thing holds for many modal A tunes that oscillate between A and G scales.  
20 buttons may be more limited than a 30 button instrument, but not as much as you might think.

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