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Theo

Cites: Exporting Concertina Containing Rosewood

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I may be attempting to export a rosewood ended concertina from the UK to the USA. I have the relevant forms and advice from the Animal and Plant Health Agency and I think I can see what is required.

 

Does anyone else have actual experience of operating this process? Any advice gratefully received that might help me avoid mistakes. In particular what sort of evidence did you use to demonstrate that the instrument was made before the cut off date for manufactured objects which I think is 1946. The concertina is a Jones English.

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Theo,

in reality this should not be a problem as the CITES regulations relate to import /export of commercial quantities of endangered species material and anything under 10kgs and anything for personal use by the purchaser should be exempt.

 

However, if you wish to obtain a CITES passport ( or whatever they call it) you might need to get the age of the instrument verified by an expert ( official) body, like a museum . I did this for my old Uilleann Pipes when I visited the USA in 2002 because the instrument contained Elephant Ivory parts. I obtained a letter of verification for the date of manufacture from the Dublin Museum curator of musicial instruments... even though it was myself telling the curator how old the instrument is. This letter was then included in an application to the relevant body... fisheries and wildlife or the like...

 

So, I'd suggest contacting Neil Wayne or the Horniman Museum.

 

I currently get around the problem of exporting new instruments, containing materials that could be construed as endangered , by either having the customers collect them or just avoiding making for customers from outside Europe.

 

Good luck with this.

 

Geoff.

Edited by Geoff Wooff

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Much relief on my part the potential buyer has decided not to buy!

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A simple resolution then Theo !

 

Perhaps those in the Antique trade have already addressed this problem and could be a useful channel for information ?

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I notice that a number of auction houses are now describing fairly obvious rosewood items just as "brown wood". Hmmm.

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