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I'm thinking of purchasing a Dremel multi-tool (or similar), mainly for model-making purposes.

 

For those who don't know (I didn't), it's basically a miniature electric screwdriver/drill, which

also comes with lots of other attachments, sanders, cutters, etc...

 

It occurs to me that such a tool might be useful for working on concertinas. Have any of the

experienced concertina fettlers out there had any experience (+ve or -ve) of using tools like

this for concertina maintenance/repair/restoration?

 

Thank you.

 

Roger

Edited by lachenal74693
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Roger

 

I've got a Dremel and do use it for some of the repair/cleaning jobs but I've found that I use it less and less these days now that I have a "proper" router table and drill press. It's useful to have a small variable speed tool with a small chuck, but to get the precision I need for drilling holes, cutting slots for corner strengthening and a host of other jobs, I'd need to get attachments for the Dremel which are almost as cheap in full size tools.

 

I'm not saying it's a bad tool or that you won't find it good for what you want to do, but think carefully about what you want to do with it and there might be better pieces of kit out there

 

Alex West

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Alex,

 

Thank you for that extraordinarily speedy reply!

 

I've got a Dremel and do use it for some of the repair/cleaning jobs but I've found that I use it less and less these days now that I have a "proper" router table and drill press. It's useful to have a small variable speed tool with a small chuck, but to get the precision I need for drilling holes, cutting slots for corner strengthening and a host of other jobs, I'd need to get attachments for the Dremel which are almost as cheap in full size tools.

 

I'm not saying it's a bad tool or that you won't find it good for what you want to do, but think carefully about what you want to do with it and there might be better pieces of kit out there

 

You've put your finger right on to at least some of my 'concerns'.

 

I'm particularly keen to know what is the largest diameter hole the thing is capable of drilling,

(and can't see this information on any of the web sites I've looked at so far). The concertina

maintenance side of things will always be a secondary application for me as I'm preparing

to build a small model railway layout, and am not intending to do much more than basic

maintenance on 'tinas.

 

As I'm constrained for space, full-size 'proper' workshop facilities are probably a bit of a

non-starter.

 

More investigation needed!

 

Thanks for the input.

 

Roger

Edited by lachenal74693
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For drilling holes at that sort of scale, don't discount the old fashioned "egg beater" hand drill. I have a vintage Stanley and use it quite a bit.

 

I also have a roughly 25 year old Minicraft MB1012 with variable speed power supply and stand, and I much prefer it to the Dremel equivalents. I have a video clip of it drilling holes in brass here:

https://www.instagram.com/p/BMDyBT6A0u1/

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If you only plan to do basic maintenance on concertinas then you don't need a power tool. A couple of good quality screwdrivers, files, pliers, and perhaps some (home made) bending irons will cover most things.

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If you only plan to do basic maintenance on concertinas then you don't need a power tool. A couple of good

quality screwdrivers, files, pliers, and perhaps some (home made) bending irons will cover most things.

 

Basic maintenance is the name of the game - thank you.

 

Don't forget the tweezers...

 

Got 'em! Also a set of jewelers screwdrivers and pliers. Now to find an egg-whisk drill and some files... Thank you.

 

Looks like I'm almost there - without the power tool.

 

Thank you folks!

 

Roger

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I currently work as a model maker, what scale is the railway layout?

 

The coolest thing about the dremel is the number of attachments you can get for it, you can even get an attachment to turn it into a rudimentary milling machine as pictured below:

 

faa9fcc3536e00961fcc4902967bcd5b.jpg

 

this allows accurate drilling of holes and slots at semi precise co-ordinates and it is small.

 

I would say that a regular pillar drill (drill press US name) is probably a better investment as you can get similar attachments for these such as this:

 

http://www.axminster.co.uk/axminster-cross-clamp-vice-75mm-3-953001

 

However if as you say space is limited (I see you are in the big city) dremels can be a great tool as all of the attachments to turn it into.. a mill, a router and whatever else are pretty small.

So bottom line I would say pillar drills are probably more desirable and useful but take up slightly more space and are potentially not quite as versatile.

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I currently work as a model maker, what scale is the railway layout? ...

 

I'm at the early stage of planning this, and the scales/terms used by railway modelers are confusing me a little,

but in my terms, I think I'll be using 9mm Peco track to model either 'standard' (ie: 4' 8.5") gauge track and

UK-only locos and rolling stock or UK-only narrow-gauge locos and rolling stock. I think these are known

respectively as 'N gauge' and 'OO9 gauge' in the railway modeler world?

 

Thanks for those insights into the possible alternatives to the multi-tool - though we seem to have established

that for the basic 'tina maintenance I am likely to undertake, the multi-tool is probably not really necessary.

 

Roger

Edited by lachenal74693
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I currently work as a model maker, what scale is the railway layout? ...

 

 

 

Thanks for those insights into the possible alternatives to the multi-tool - though we seem to have established

that for the basic 'tina maintenance I am likely to undertake, the multi-tool is probably not really necessary.

 

Roger

 

fair enough, I wouldn't choose a dremel for the concertina maintenance either. Don't rule it out for the railway models though B)

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