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Ninth Charles Wheatstone Memorial Mornington Crescent Game


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Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. It is my privilege and honour on this the one hundred and twelfth birthday on the founder of our feast, Charles Wheatstone, once again to summon as many as will to play the Ninth Annual Charles Wheatstone Memorial Mornington Crescent game.

 

Last year, as many will recall, after a thrilling if somewhat protracted game it was Woody who pipped us all to the post and won. It is therefore my honour and privilege, not to mention my privilege and honour, to call upon Woody to accept the privilege of setting the, doubtless, very honourable rules and making the first move of what will be, I am certain, a very privileged and honourable game.

 

Once again I shall take the very privileged and honourable position of chairman, thus relinquishing the honour and privilege of combat. So, over to you, Woody ...

 

Chris

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Indeed it can and is particularly appropriate since Charles Wheatstone was taught the rules of the Great Game by his friend Faraday while they were waiting for a train at New Cross Gate - the train had been delayed due to a strike amongst the navvies building the Thames Tunnel which would delay its arrival by nearly three years.

 

Chris

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Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. It is my privilege and honour on this the one hundred and twelfth birthday on the founder of our feast, Charles Wheatstone, once again to summon as many as will to play the Ninth Annual Charles Wheatstone Memorial Mornington Crescent game.

 

Last year, as many will recall, after a thrilling if somewhat protracted game it was Woody who pipped us all to the post and won. It is therefore my honour and privilege, not to mention my privilege and honour, to call upon Woody to accept the privilege of setting the, doubtless, very honourable rules and making the first move of what will be, I am certain, a very privileged and honourable game.

 

Once again I shall take the very privileged and honourable position of chairman, thus relinquishing the honour and privilege of combat. So, over to you, Woody ...

 

Chris

 

Thankyou Chris. I feel privileged and honoured.

 

Firstly can I ask that this year we have a game that is seen to be clean and honest. Some of you let yourselves down last year (you know who you are!) by getting caught, while some of us put in the extra effort to cover our tracks. So the first rule of MC 2014 is don't get caught!

 

Secondly Samantha has complained that the leaking of certain indiscretions by players was blamed upon her. She insists that she didn't say a word! If you plan on taking advantage of some of the less savoury opportunities that a game of Mornington Crescent can present please take steps to disguise your identity. So the second rule of MC 2014 is don't get caught!

 

Finally I have received several offers of money to introduce rule modifications that favour individual players. These approaches were clumsy and ill thought out and I had no hesitation in rejecting them due to the unwanted police attention that they brought with them. If you want to bribe me to improve your chances please be more inventive (oh! and include more money!). So the third rule of MC 2014 is don't get caught!

 

Variations in play are:

 

Edgar's sore point

Harrington's bike shelter shame

Edward

 

Banned moves:

 

Longworthy's limp #12

 

Have a good game and if the tube's on strike you'll have to walk

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Thank you, Woody, for that cautionary note. Might I add that it is my intention as your chairman to maintain and indeed enhance my reputation for always being seen to deal fairly and open-handedly with all. In particular I will never knowingly accept a bribe, although as the Chairman's Manual (Revised Helsinki edition, 2013) so wisely states, "The Chairman must always show great compassion to any player who, through no fault of their own, finds themselves overburdened with cash and requests circumstantial relief".

 

In the angelic spirit which thus prevails at this point in the game I think Steve's move most apposite.

 

Chris

Edited by Chris Timson
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Thank you, Woody, for that cautionary note. Might I add that it is my intention as your chairman to maintain and indeed enhance my reputation for always being seen to deal fairly and open-handedly with all. In particular I will never knowingly accept a bribe, although as the Chairman's Manual (Revised Helsinki edition, 2013) so wisely states, "The Chairman must always show great compassion to any player who, through no fault of their own, finds themselves overburdened with cash and requests circumstantial relief".

 

In the angelic spirit which thus prevails at this point in the game I think Steve's move most apposite.

 

Chris

 

Thanks Chris - the money's in the post

 

Lawks a lordy Mary Poppins - let's all go to Whitechapel

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Let's let a Yank cowboy give this a try. I been studying the games for the last several years. My first play is:

 

Blackhorse Road

 

Alan

Alan

 

Good move

 

This allows me to invoke Longworthy's limp #13 (#12 is banned) - I can hobble over to a ghost station - British Museum

Edited by SteveS
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Might I add that it is my intention as your chairman to maintain and indeed enhance my reputation for always being seen to deal fairly and open-handedly with all. In particular I will never knowingly accept a bribe, although as the Chairman's Manual (Revised Helsinki edition, 2013) so wisely states, "The Chairman must always show great compassion to any player who, through no fault of their own, finds themselves overburdened with cash and requests circumstantial relief".

 

Unfortunately, the merk is no longer convertable, and neither is the groat or plack, so I find myself disadvantaged.

 

This allows me to invoke Longworthy's limp #13 (#12 is banned) - I can hobble over to a ghost station - British Museum

 

So the only use I can make of a noble is to move to

 

Earl's Court

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Let's let a Yank cowboy give this a try. I been studying the games for the last several years. My first play is:

 

Blackhorse Road

 

Alan

Alan

 

Good move

 

This allows me to invoke Longworthy's limp #13 (#12 is banned) - I can hobble over to a ghost station - British Museum

 

 

I didn't exclude Limp #13 because I (foolishly) assumed that nobody would stoop that low. If we're going down those lines I play an Edward - option 4b - occasional variations in rail-utilising vehicles employed as a means to be bleedin' awkward in the form of a hand powered trolley taking me to Strand (disused) - Platform 2. The last service left in 1917 so you might have a bit of a wait.

Edited by Woody
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