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Finally, I bought a Wheatstone English Concertina


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Hello:

 

I am very happy because I finally bought a beautiful Wheatstone Concertina, Nº 2497, steel reeds, restored in concert pitch. It´s sounds amazing.

 

It has a label that shows LORD OTHO FITZGERALD, maybe an antique owner.

 

Since I bought it, I have strange dreams, jajaja.

 

Does anyone knows about it age?

 

Kind Regards

 

Juan

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Congratulations Juan! I am jealous, though I am very happy with my Lachenal. It is a very merry instrument. I can only hope you have as much fun with your concertina. We'll all be interested to hear if Bolivia is as much a concertina desert as Wisconsin USA! Will you be teaching yourself? You'll find a ton of materials (music and instruction tutors) available from here at Concertina.net. Even from Wis I was able to tutor myself thru the internet. Ain't it great! Michelle

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Hi Juan

 

Lots of music on a concertina from Bolivia. But there's not an Anglo in sight. Your Wheatstone should fit right in. They generally look like this:

 

Waldo Trujillo is the musician, and I've come across quite a few other videos from there. Most of which are posted as I found them. Nice music.

 

Thanks

Leo B)

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Yay, from one Wheastone owner (#5982) to another, welcome aboard!

 

As regards age, the Wheastone sales ledgers are online at http://www.horniman.info/INDEX.HTM, so if you search through them you might be able to find the original date of purchase of your box.

 

Not every individual concertina is listed though and they're not in numerical order, for reasons explained on the Horniman site.

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Thanks everybody, I am happy to have all of you like friends.

 

Bolivia is not a concertina desert as Wisconsin USA, there is a lot of melodies and styles that someone can play in a concertina, what I like to play is Cuecas, is something like Tango (from Argentina) but in the Bolivian Style. Actually I am making a compilation about the Bolivian music, there is interesting stories about how the concertina came to Bolivia. Unfortunatelly few people can have a concertina to play, because the price (expensive) and rare (hard to find).

 

I am learning myself, I know that is a hard instrument to play, but I have a good ear and a lot of patience, I hope someone can help me to play English music, I found it interesting.

 

Thanks

 

Kind Regards

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Waldo Trujillo is the musician, and I've come across quite a few other videos from there. ... Nice music.

 

Hi, Leo, Hi, Juan,

 

Yes, a very interesting clip! It's very noticeable how South American an English concertina sounds in the hands of a Bolivian musician. It casts a light on the perennial arguments about which concertina system is good for which music. The concertina is only one half of the equation - the musician is the other half! I would even go as far as to say that the musician is the decisive half.

 

Cheers,

John

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I am learning myself, I know that is a hard instrument to play, but I have a good ear and a lot of patience, I hope someone can help me to play English music, I found it interesting.

 

Thanks

 

Kind Regards

Congratulations Juan, I purchased my first concertina a Lachenal a short 6 months ago and I like you am thrilled to be part of the family so-to-speak. Now what you will have to control is the urge to buy more concertinas. I was told this but did not necessarily believe it. But here I am in Texas now with three concertinas my original Lachenal Tutor (whose mellowness of sound I love), A Wheatstone and a Lachenal Metal ended Edeophone. I am looking forward to chatting with you. I am taking lessons online via Skype from Pauline de Snoo in Holland and learning alot from all the experts here. Oh what a small world we live in. Looking forward to chatting with you. Stephen Knoll, Tyler, Texas

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Actually I am making a compilation about the Bolivian music, there is interesting stories about how the concertina came to Bolivia.

 

Hello Juan

I'd love to learn a little more about the history of concertina in Bolivia and in south America !

You may know that Dan Whorrall, a regular contributor to this forum, has published a huge study relating the history of concertina (mostly anglo) in the 19th century. His survey mostly focussed on english-speaking countries (UK, ireland, australia, NZ, South Africa), and I beleive there remains some work to be done on the history of concertina in the rest of the world. If you have any elements, I'm sure you will get strong interest from the "historians" of this forum !

 

As for me, I'm presently doing some research about free-reed instruments in France in the 19th century, but concertina sightings are quite rare here sad.gif

Edited by david fabre
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Stephen Knoll, Tyler, Texas

 

Hi Stephen,

 

You may know all about this already... but will we be seeing you at the Palestine Old Time Dulcimer and Concertina festival this March 29, 30, 31?

 

http://www.oldpalmusic.com/

 

Palestine is only a short hour down 155 from Tyler. Lots of English concertina players will be there as well as players of most of the other types. I'm honored to have been asked to be the hired gun and though I play Anglo I'll be teaching all systems in my workshops.

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Actually I am making a compilation about the Bolivian music, there is interesting stories about how the concertina came to Bolivia.

 

Hello Juan

I'd love to learn a little more about the history of concertina in Bolivia and in south America !

You may know that Dan Whorrall, a regular contributor to this forum, has published a huge study relating the history of concertina (mostly anglo) in the 19th century. His survey mostly focussed on english-speaking countries (UK, ireland, australia, NZ, South Africa), and I beleive there remains some work to be done on the history of concertina in the rest of the world. If you have any elements, I'm sure you will get strong interest from the "historians" of this forum !

 

As for me, I'm presently doing some research about free-reed instruments in France in the 19th century, but concertina sightings are quite rare here sad.gif

 

Hello David:

 

As soon as I finish my research, I will post it.

 

One of my friends will give me some very old pictures about english people playing the concertina in Bolivia. I will post everything, do not worry.

 

Regards.

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Congratulations Juan, I purchased my first concertina a Lachenal a short 6 months ago and I like you am thrilled to be part of the family so-to-speak. Now what you will have to control is the urge to buy more concertinas. I was told this but did not necessarily believe it. But here I am in Texas now with three concertinas my original Lachenal Tutor (whose mellowness of sound I love), A Wheatstone and a Lachenal Metal ended Edeophone. I am looking forward to chatting with you. I am taking lessons online via Skype from Pauline de Snoo in Holland and learning alot from all the experts here. Oh what a small world we live in. Looking forward to chatting with you. Stephen Knoll, Tyler, Texas

 

Hello Jody:

 

I am agree with you, I just bought another concertina, a Lachenal, so I have to control the urge to buy more concertinas, until it become an adiction, jajaja.

 

I am interested in learn more about concertinas, too. Chatting with you will be a pleasure, just tell me how can we chat.

 

Kind Regards

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So, this is the concertina that was sold on E-bay, 24 th September??

see here E-Bay

 

regards

Jake

 

Hello Jake:

 

Yes, it is, but I have made a lot of work on it, restored to a concert pitch, the bellows, new straps, cleaned (inside and outside), and polished (sides), fortunately I found a very good "louthier" here in Bolivia, he restored the pitch, I think is the most difficult issue to make. The concertina was in a good shape, the keys have the letters on it, and I take care of it, give maintenance.

 

My objetive is to keep it "original" (as it was when it was sold). Inside, the reed pans are immaculate. The first owner was very careful, he loved this instrument as I do. When I play it, it seems to mourn.

 

Regards

Juan

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As for me, I'm presently doing some research about free-reed instruments in France in the 19th century, but concertina sightings are quite rare here sad.gif

 

Ain't that the truth!

 

People here only know bandoneons, so my English is described as "le petit frère du bandonéon" (bandoneon's little brother).

 

Apart from one lady who insists on calling it an accordina. To my shame, I didn't even know the accordina existed, but there is an accordina maker about 60km from here, in the Gard.

 

Very exciting that an Irish one has made its way to Brazil though. Globalisation isn't all bad! :-)

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