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LateToTheGame

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  • Gender
    Female
  • Interests
    Concertina, wooden flute, whistle et al
  • Location
    Chicagoland

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Chatty concertinist

Chatty concertinist (4/6)

  1. If you want the actual projected waiting time it is best to actually use the contact info and ask. Websites are sometimes up to date, sometimes not, and things change all the time. Many makers get piles of email from serious and not serious inquiries, so be pleasant and be patient.
  2. I would be fun to know where it has gone. I hope it has a happy home.
  3. As many have said above, finding the alternative notes on the anglo keyboard is going to help a lot. There are ways to play almost all the most common notes on both a push and a pull. As you get more familiar with the keyboard this will make sense. The lower F# and the middle C# are likely the only common ones with one button/direction since you are working with the Wheatstone keyboard. I say common because I am thinking like a Irish Trad player. You will find more single notes as you lean into the flats. But here is where I play devil's advocate. You have a Phoenix now and shifting back to an English may set you back a few bucks. But if you want to find a quality English you will be able to get a nice quality vintage English for less than an equivalent quality antique anglo. This is due to market demand. The worldwide popularity of Irish Trad music has made nice vintage anglos scarce and prices rise quite high. And while new makers of custom instruments need to charge about the same for an Anglo as they do for an English, an excellent English can be purchased relatively reasonably. And for what you are attempting to do, an English might be just the ticket. Check out the English concertina listings at The Button Box in MA, and feel free to call and ask questions. They may have some great advice for you, whichever system you stick with.
  4. I would wonder if using a PVA archival grade glue would be good if you are going PVA, the price difference between the craft stuff and the archival grade is not that significant. It is formulated to have a neutral PH.
  5. All of us, especially when we are older need to take things slow. As my name implies I am of a similar age, but started 10 or 15 years ago +- depending on how you count downtime. It is very important to get yourself into the proper hand position to avoid injury. I would suggest you book an online lesson with a concertina player to specifically deal with wrist position and angles and all that good stuff. I was fortunate enough to start my lessons with an All Ireland pro who had learned from his stuff from the great players of his generation and the generation before him. He was very good at setting me straight on how to avoid injury. One of his early lessons was how to hold the wrists solidly with most movement coming from the arms and fingers, and exactly how to angle the wrist as you hold the concertina towards your lap. These details will help you avoid stress injury. If there is no great player nearby, covid has given a lot of great players and teachers a lot of experience teaching online through zoom. Even if the budget won't allow an extended set of lessons, many teachers are good at getting you started. Nothing beats having someone watch you and notice details about your posture we might not notice ourselves.
  6. Check with Barleycorn Concertinas. If you don't see it on their page contact them directly. They often have things that are not listed.
  7. It is jeffries. Which was mentioned in one of the original posters post. I remember because I am a Wheatstone layout player or may have been interested.
  8. I I think where the thread is leaning is: These are good questions best asked either in a Personal Message or in the General Discussion forum. There are things I would like to know about the Steve Dickinson Wheatstones myself. Though I am currently not in the market I've become intensely interested in the minutia of anglo concertina history and evolution. The question why concertina X should cost more or less than concertina Y or Z could be carried on as a General Discussion and a person would get input from many others. Much could be learned by picking the brains of the experts on the forum. For the most part I've found the folks here to be very understanding, and while occasionally we may seem "flinty" most folks here are very generous with their knowledge and experience and forgiving of the occasional misstep. (I, myself have made a few verbal blunders here) And, yes, what seems like an obvious direct question to one person might suffer misunderstanding due to the subtly of cross cultural communication. But we can all grow together here through our common interest.
  9. I thought of kitty litter too, as I've used it in musty smelling violin cases, but it is good to hear it works for smoke. I'd be concerned about the citus cleaners. I use them a lot around my house but they are very strong, don't interact well with unfinished wood (Like the inside of your concertina) and don't seem to be particularly fond of leather. If you like the smell of orange or lemon you could put a tiny bit of lemon or orange OIL furniture polish on a dry t-shirt rag and test a small area. These oils do some surface cleaning, but are not designed to have the "grease cutting" properties that the cleaners which are designed for cleaning your kitchen or your workshop are famous for. Grease cutting = drying out leather and wood.
  10. I was walking quickly through a room while out of the corner of my eye I spied Idris Elba holding a concertina. No, he was not visiting. My son was watching Prometheus, a science fiction flick on a rather large screen. I didn't stick around to see if the concertiina was actually played or if so for how long, but it was fun to see.
  11. Leaving it out to air putting some charcoal (like the bamboo charcoal suggested above, or even home made charcoal or briquets without lighter fluid impregnated) next to it in a box lightly rubbing it down with a dry rag giving it some time playing it a lot to move the inside air with a window open (sorry, winter) and the ozone cleaner suggestion above if you are in rush, are all suggestions that spring to my ex-smoker's mind. It has been 35 years for me but I smoked as did my dad before me and none of the instruments or other items we used to smoke around have any odor. It does take time. But not that long. You will smell it for a month or so if you keep airing it and playing it. But it will dissipate.
  12. If it is a nice old lachenal it might be best to find someone who knows what they are doing. It is a rite of passage to take apart your concertina. Many of us end up doing it eventually to dislodge dust or diagnose easy fixes on this or that. But it is a bit daunting the first time round. There are a surprisingly fair number of people out there who could do this for you, but you may need to send it off to someone. Knowing what country and what part of the country you live in would help for recommendations.
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