Jump to content

4to5to6

Members
  • Posts

    223
  • Joined

Everything posted by 4to5to6

  1. After calling last night, I just dropped by the store and showed the owners a playable unrestored concertina I recently purchased for $300. I was sure there would never be a sale between us however I was still curious to see if it had brass or aluminum reeds and what type of chambers, etc. I wanted to help answer the questions here and felt sorry for this neglected 80 year old instrument sitting in its case for maybe 50 years and the unconditioned bellows being played and maybe cracking. Instruments need to be loved! i was willing to make a high as possible offer myself if everything checked out but we never got to that point. I had let it go already but all the interest on c.net made me curious again. The concertina is a difficult instrument when it comes to buying and selling and even getting parts and working with restorers because even though not that popular, the supply is quite low and many are very old and appeal to collector enthusiasts with the money who are hoarding them as antiques. I was once sent a photo of a full book case displaying their one of each tortoise and amboyna collection. All I could think about was those poor lonely instruments and the musicians struggling to get something decent including myself at that time. In the 50s and 60s you couldn’t give concertinas away (like an old upright piano today) and they were being given a quick tuning with a dremel destroying the reeds but now it’s unbelievably hard as a player to get a decent unmolested instrument at a good price. I’ve been a musician for 40 years and am often surprised I made it with the concertina because of all my initial hassles and expensive mistakes. Buyer beware! I feel really discouraged today! In the end, i think it is better just to buy from a private individual for an unrestored instrument or just bite the bullet and get a fully restored concertina once you know the concertina is for you. Just let one come to you. Be patient. I am starting to ask myself if these rescue missions are worth it and just have to let them go. Sorry, no photos of the inside. .
  2. I can look at it again if anyone is really interested in it at this price. I can ask to take a look inside and send a few photos if you want me too. Do a short video maybe.
  3. I looked at it in person. It was in unrestored condition. I have described the tone above. It was priced as if fully restored and as much as I get excited when I see an EC for sale, I painfully had to reject this one. Chris Algar has fully restored and tuned ones available for much less. The value is 60 to 70% top period as discussed above. I could look at it again and ask the owner to let me open it up and take a few photos. I’ve been trying to stay away from it though as I know how I am... I hate to see instruments sit around like this unrestored and so may have mercy on it. Over the years I’ve lost a lot of money this way.
  4. Thanks Geoff. It is an untouched original even with the baffles still in place and really no visible playing wear so somewhat interesting to me. I don’t think it will sell too soon as the shop is asking full price as if it were restored. If I don’t purchase it then I hope it goes to a home that will appreciate and play it. It may not be the instrument for me as I already have a top end tenor-treble fully restored but you don’t see these come available in my area very often. It would be interesting to see inside. Maybe quickly glue in place the loose pads so I can play a tune on it. I wasn’t overly impressed with the tone although it may just need to be played for a while to bring it back to life. The dynamic range was extremely impressive so it could be an instrument with a lot of expression.
  5. I viewed a 1942 48 button Wheatstone Aeola today in a pawn shop. It has very little playing wear but is unrestored. It had been stored for maybe 60 years. Pads are loose, notes are sounding, it fails hang test miserably. It has 8 folds which seems a bit unusual. I wasn’t able to open it up. Tone is decent, medium loud, baffles are still there. It has exceptionally good dynamics. My question is on it’s worth. What would be a reasonable offer for a war time Aeola with little playing wear but completely unrestored? Thanks
  6. Concertina Spares is the only place that I know of as a major source to get those old vintage bits and pieces. Thankfully these instruments were built by hand with simple machines which made them so good and long lasting. So any of the parts including buttons, levers, reeds, etc (except maybe a glass button) can be built in a small shop with the simplest of equipment and tools. The good old days!!! Has there yet come along anything better than leather! A carbon fibre Concertina with ceramic reeds and plastic bellows anyone? I hope everything is ok with Mark and as I said, he did apologize and I am hoping again to soon get my parts. I just picked up a late c.1895 Lachenal baritone with two missing button tops which got me thinking about all this again and so asked him to add these to the order as well. To answer a comment... I am sure I could make these parts myself with a small lathe, some nickel tubing... soldering some silver discs to the tops. I have the skill set but I don’t have a small lathe or the material and it’s really not worth it to get one as I restore maybe one concertina every 2 or 3 years for my personal use. Maybe someone can start an online database where everyone can list all their spare bits and pieces. I know I have a bunch that I could share. I put my name on Wim Walker’s wait list over two years ago to get a new EC built in 2022 so hopefully my woes will come to an end with a lifelong instrument but the vintage ones really do have something special about them. I really do need the help of someone like Mark at Concertina Spares to keep me going with the concertina in the mean time so hopefully things will work out.
  7. I have not had a good experience with getting parts from Mark even though he’s apologized to me multiple times and promised to help me over and over. It’s been over 3 years, almost 4 and my Aeola project is still on hold. I mainly ordered some strap screws, end bolts, missing buttons, some felt and leather, etc. and paid a good amount which I thought was fair but I had to return a lot of the parts as they weren’t even close to mine even though photos and precise measurements were first sent. I then emailed more photos. I even posted him full size photocopies in the mail of parts along with the returned unusable items. I finally sent him my original sample parts at a very expensive high speed post rate but to date, I still do not have the parts that I am missing even though he has acknowledged receipt of the info and the returns. Not sure what has happened to my parts but I’m now afraid I will never even see them again. I remember explaining this fall that I really wanted to work on this project this winter. If anyone can help me, I would be very grateful as I don’t know what to do or where to go to get the parts I need. I can forget the money, but to be without my original parts that were sent is a hard pill to swallow. Update: I just sent Mark another email a few moments after doing this post and he quickly replied with an apology and a promise to sort things out this week. I am feeling a bit hopeful again. Maybe it was health issues or something.
  8. I've had coils that are too small work there way underneath the levers and stop the pads from closing. Can anyone summarize what the ideal button pressure is for different types of concertinas and different playing techniques. I've always wanted to have the opportunity to play Simon Thoumire's concertina for example. I love the way he does cuts, strikes and rolls. Does he prefer a light action or heavey? Low buttons? Short or long button travel?
  9. Thanks Robin, it was well worth the wait. I am completely happy with it. It is a miracle how this all came about! I promise to play it well. It will not sit on the shelf. I wish I knew more of it's history. It appears to have spent a lot of it's life in Australia based on the previous seller's location. It even has a very old Glen Innes, NSW Beardies Festival sticker on the case. If anyone possibly knows anything about Wheatstone metal ended TT Aeola 28030 or possibly someone that may of played it at Glen Innes years ago, please let me know.
  10. I read somewhere that you can remove all the reeds, reassemble the instrument, play it, and even with all the reeds removed hear the approximate pitches from the air rushing through the tuned chambers. Is this true? If so, wouldn't this indicate that the chambers are finely tuned to the reed's pitch? Original "old pitch"!!! Is this for tuning reed volumes through resonance? Or... are the reed chambers sized only to influence the responsiveness? John
  11. I imagine that musical expression goes way up with even key heights, cross hole bushings that are just the right size, spring tension set even and at the right level, pads lifting to right height etc. etc. At the very least it would make the instrument a true pleasure to play as all your energy is going into making the music rather than compensating for inconsistencies.
  12. Chris, The evidence for this is that they didn't have harmonic and frequency spectrum analyzers, electronic tuners, etc. to see what was going on. The y used their ears. Don't take me wrong... I was complimenting their ability. I am simply wondering if by lowering the pitch to A440 we are throwing everything out of wack... All those things they tweaked by ear... Is it possible the tone and the response is thrown off by lowering the pitch of each reed. Just throwing it out there. I may be totally wrong. Theo, I agree, just as there was no thread standard for the end bolts, there was also no standard for the overall pitch of the instrument. I understand they have tested tuning forks found in old opera houses and they have been all over the map as far as pitch. This all aside, Back on topic... I still can't understand why you blow on a reed with your mouth and there is very little sound and yet put it into a concertina and it is LOUD. I understand there is almost no vibrations in the reed shoe so it's not like a guitar top. The air is chopped up by a pendulum swinging through an air gap. How is the sound amplified and what is the path of this sound and why are there chambers for only the draw reeds (yet the same tone on push)??? What am I missing here?
  13. Thanks. Along the line of your thoughts... I wonder if tuning a concertina to A440 down from A453 messes everything up? In the old days, they fined tuned everything by ear to the old pitch... chambers, hole sizes, pad opening, even voicing of the reeds.
  14. It's hard for me to visualize how the sound is "amplified" in a concertina. The reed itself doesn't significantly make any sound I've often read, it generates a frequency by cutting (starting and stopping) the air column travelling through the shoe as the tongue swings back and forth through the gap like a pendulum. I can visualize that this how the sound starts but not how it is amplified or resonates through the concertina. Sucking or blowing through a reed removed from the instrument makes very little sound. Maybe the reed shoe just has to be attached to something solid with mass to cut the air column cleanly. I am guessing. I can visualize the sound generation and amplification in a clarinet, trumpet, flute (the hardest one) and even a lot easier in a harmonica. I just can't see how the chambers affect the tone in a concertina especially when the sound is the same on both draw and push while the chambers are on only one side.
  15. I just started a new thread requesting info on the path of sound waves through a concertina: http://www.concertina.net/forums/index.php?showtopic=19123
  16. A discussion on the defining Wheatstone's golden age resulted in discussions on materials, end plate design, fret work etc. and I started thinking about how the vibrations travel through a concertina... I thought it would be more appropriate to pick it up here... I don't really understand how the ends affect the sound as it's a total mystery how the reed generated air vibrations even travels through a concertina. For example, with two sets of reeds on an English, why are there reed pan chambers only on the outside of the pan? Wouldn't this chamber only be active on press when the air inside the bellows flows through the inside reed, pulsates or cuts up the air flow causing a tone, goes through the valve then into the chamber and finally out through the open pad hole and out the fret work. But what about on pull when the air flows inward? Does the sound still go outward? Probably a dumb question but it appears it does and so a total mystery to me! I've always wanted to make some models to experiment with how the sound travels through then start doing experiments with chamber sizes, pad hole sizes, reed scaling, etc... even how the thickness of valve material affects the tone. I've asked this a few times with conflicting answers. Maybe someone could explain it quickly and especially the affects of different valve thicknesses and stiffnesses. Why are shallow reed pans louder? What about mahogany reed pans? And this is all apart from the different types of reed material which radically affects the tone. It would be awesome to be able to go back 90 years and pick the brains of one of Wheatstone's master builders. Wouldn't that be something?!!
  17. I have been contemplating building a number of different wooden ends to fit my model 22 metal ended treble. That way everything will be consistent except the different ends. Also thought of trying different fretwork patterns including the early Aeola dot & comma pattern while I'm at it. I've down the CAD drawings, just need the time, money for materials and a place to work. Maybe one day. You know... I don't really understand how the ends affect the sound as it's a total mystery how the reed generated air vibrations even travels through a concertina. For example, with two sets of reeds on an English, why are there reed pan chambers only on the outside of the pan? Wouldn't this chamber only be active on press when the air inside the bellows flows through the inside reed, pulsates or cuts up the air flow causing a tone, goes through the valve then into the chamber and finally out through the open pad hole and out the fret work. But what about on pull when the air flows inward? Does the sound still go outward? Probably a dumb question but it appears it does and so a total mystery to me! I've always wanted to make some models to experiment with how the sound travels through then start doing experiments with chamber sizes, pad hole sizes, reed scaling, etc... even how the thickness of valve material affects the tone. I've asked this a few times with conflicting answers. Probably getting off topic and maybe should be in a new thread but your comments on Britannia metal got me thinking about it again. Maybe someone could explain it quickly and especially the affects of different valve thicknesses and stiffness. Why are shallow reed pans louder? What about mahogany reed pans? And this is all apart from the different types of reed material which radically affects the tone. It would awesome to be able to go back 90 years and pick the brains of one of Wheatstone's master builders. Wouldn't that be something?!!
  18. Thanks Geoff I often wonder why the more "hard use" an instrument experiences, the better it sounds? Your 315xx examples fall nearly right in the middle of 1927. 31536 dates Aug 26, 1927 http://www.horniman.info/ 1927 = 31332 - 31773 31000 = Feb 18, 1926 31999 = Nov 5, 1928 Interesting.
  19. 4to5to6

    For Sale

    Donald, does the one you were playing fit the description of the one for sale? Any photos? Is it possible to have two Wheatstones with the same serial?
  20. I wholeheartedly agree. The instrument must fit into the mix. What sounds great as a solo instrument may completely get lost in an Irish session for example. So "The Best" is very subjective. 1927 serial numbers range from 31332 - 31773. Geoff, what made the 1927 ones you had so good? Was it the tone? Responsiveness? Balance between treble and low notes? Was there anything that stood out in the design, materials, workmanship, etc.? Maybe the reed scaling was different? What was going on in the history of Wheatstone around 1927? Off the topic... What is the range of your 1927 Baritone/Treble and how many buttons does it have? What model # is it? Serial maybe so I can look it up?
  21. 4to5to6

    For Sale

    Wow! Great price for a fully restored Aeola. Any chance of posting some photos?
  22. What is the Wheatstone Golden Age or Golden Era all about? I was told this was 30xxx to 32xxx (1924 to 1933), others say 1900 to 1930. Some strongly object to this narrow of range and others insist it is exclusively only 31xxx instruments. I know every concertina is an individual and so it depends strongly on current condition, the reed tuning (re-tuning) condition / skill, the voicing, whether it is played in, air tightness, bellows condition, etc. etc. and I certainly agree that an older less popular instrument can be much superior to a rarer more expensive one. There is collector's antique value vs. players instrument value. Tone quality and even volume, dynamics and responsiveness can all be subjective. It seems the musical quality of an instrument is hard to define but most agree that you can instantly tell when it's there. You just know it! The instrument speaks out and is expressive. You connect with it. So is the Wheatstone Golden Age about reed pan design, action design, materials, quality of workmanship, etc. etc. or is this a collector's thing? All things being equal... What makes these instruments superior? This is probably not an objective thing (or is it?), but more of an opinion thing. I see this phrase a lot so have to ask... What is the Wheatstone Golden Age and when was it?
×
×
  • Create New...