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Pete Dunk

Something For The Weekend?

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As Dirge is in a JS Bach mood he'll no

 

Oi!

He's got Mozart homework at the moment and it is overdue; so don't give 'im an excuse to b-ach-unk off and skive! B)

He is also probably going round in his MG ramraiding supermarkets because of the Great Marmite Shortage (played glissando con toasto caldo in NZ. Instead of following the mob in Marmageddon he ought to be working on his Triumphal March, to lead from the front in Aida-laide.....!

http://newsfeed.time.com/2012/03/20/marmageddon-new-zealand-faces-shortage-of-marmite-spread/

 

 

V nice by the way :) and off to find out if it will work on a C#D box.it is just about my speed too.

Edited by Kautilya

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One of the tunes I struggled with when transcribing Benjamin's Book was "Jessie, The Flow'r O' Dumblane" as several of the measures didn't have enough notes of the right length to make up the bar properly. While browsing though an old(ish) book of British fiddle tunes yesterday I found a much more playable version and it really is a lovely tune. Here it's in C but the version in Benjamin's Book was written in D so I've transposed it to that key too. Give it a go!

 

X:35

T:Flower of Dumblane, The

M:6/8

L:1/8

Q:3/8=100

Z:Peter Dunk 2012

K:C

c/d/|e>fe d>ge|cBc d<Bc/A/|GcF E>AF|cde d2 c/d/|

e>fe d>ge|cBc d<Bc/A/|GAF EGc|edB c2:|

e|e>cd e>ag|e>cd e>fe|d>Bc d>ge|dBg HG2 G/c/|

c>ed e>cc|e>ge f>de|fga g>ec|dAB c2 c/A/|

GAF E<Gc/e/|e>ge f>de|f>ga gec|d<AB c2|]

 

X:35

T:Flower of Dumblane, The

M:6/8

L:1/8

Q:3/8=100

Z:Peter Dunk 2012

K:Dmaj

d/2e/2|f>gf e>af|dcd e<cd/2B/2|AdG F>BG|def e2 d/2e/2|

f>gf e>af|dcd e<cd/2B/2|ABG FAd|fec d2:|

f|f>de f>ba|f>de f>gf|e>cd e>af|eca HA2 A/2d/2|

d>fe f>dd|f>af g>ef|gab a>fd|eBc d2 d/2B/2|

ABG F<Ad/2f/2|f>af g>ef|g>ab afd|e<Bc d2|]

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Here's a cheerful little 24 bar jig that just rolls along, with no real surprises or demanding bits, just fun to play. :)

 

X:88

T:Curtissimo's Frolick

M:6/8

L:1/8

Q:3/8=100

K:D

dAG FED|fed ecA|dAG FED|Adcd3::fed a2 d|edc a2 c|

def edc|BA^G A3::BAG d2G|AGF d2 F|GAB AGF|EDC D3:|

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Believe it or not, I'm finding Curtissimo's Frolick quite a challenge on the Anglo.

Even transposed into C major doesn't help one bit!

It looks so simple as sheet music, but boyo-boy-o-boy does it cause neural pain when I try to play it. The best I can do is the pace of one crotchet per second.

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Slow, slow, quick quick, slow

One of the tunes I struggled with when transcribing Benjamin's Book was "Jessie, The Flow'r O' Dumblane" as several of the measures didn't have enough notes of the right length to make up the bar properly. While browsing though an old(ish) book of British fiddle tunes yesterday I found a much more playable version and it really is a lovely tune. Here it's in C but the version in Benjamin's Book was written in D so I've transposed it to that key too. Give it a go!

 

X:35

T:Flower of Dumblane, The

M:6/8

L:1/8

Q:3/8=100

Z:Peter Dunk 2012

K:C

c/d/|e>fe d>ge|cBc d<Bc/A/|GcF E>AF|cde d2 c/d/|

e>fe d>ge|cBc d<Bc/A/|GAF EGc|edB c2:|

e|e>cd e>ag|e>cd e>fe|d>Bc d>ge|dBg HG2 G/c/|

c>ed e>cc|e>ge f>de|fga g>ec|dAB c2 c/A/|

GAF E<Gc/e/|e>ge f>de|f>ga gec|d<AB c2|]

 

really lyrical in windows media player at slow speed. tku! :)

 

Found this

harp

and

Quote:This is a perfect example of the "gentle, artless lyrics set to traditional music" written by Robert Tannahill (1774-1810). But it is not clear why this Paisley-born weaver should have been inspired by Jessie from Dunblane in Perthshire but it has become one of his most popular songs. The tune to which it is sung is by R A Smith.

 

Jessie the Flower o' Dunblane

The sun has gane down o'er the lofty Ben Lomond,

And left the red clouds to preside o'er the scene;

While lanely I stray in the calm simmer gloamin',

To muse on sweet Jessie, the flow'r o' Dunblane.

 

How sweet is the brier wi' its saft fauldin' blossom,

And sweet is the birk wi' its mantle o' green;

Yet sweeter and fairer, and dear to this bosom,

Is lovely young Jessie, the flow'r o' Dunblane.

 

She's modest as onie and blythe as she's bonnie,

For guileless simplicity marks her its ain;

And far be the villain divested o' feeling,

Wha'd blight in its bloom the sweet flow'r o' Dunblane.

 

Sing on, thou sweet mavis, thy hymn to the evening,

Thour't dear to the echoes o' Calderwood glen;

Sae dear to this bosom, sae artless and winning,

Is the charming young Jessie, the flow'r o' Dunblane.

 

Meaning of unusual words:

gane=gone

lanely=lonely

simmer gloamin'=summer twilight/dusk

brier=wild rose bush

birk=birch tree

onie=any

blythe=cheerful, merry

bonnie=pretty, attractive

ain=own

mavis=song thrush

 

Intrestingly two big hits at the Swaledale concert were two solos of Londonderry Air/Danny on aurally utterly different instruments and the massed tina band playing an elegantly harmonised version of I'll take you home again Kathleen = (almost) not a dry eye in the room - And a multifloral soaring and magically quiet and stormy virtuoso performance by Alastair Anderson (about Lindisfarne/Holy Island apparently)

So "slow" may be pulling the (heart) strings again. :)

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Slow, slow, quick quick, slow

 

Good grief, I understood every word of that. Have you been drinking or summat? :lol:

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X:35

T:Flower of Dumblane, The

M:6/8

L:1/8

Q:3/8=100

Z:Peter Dunk 2012

K:Dmaj

d/2e/2|f>gf e>af|dcd e<cd/2B/2|AdG F>BG|def e2 d/2e/2|

f>gf e>af|dcd e<cd/2B/2|ABG FAd|fec d2:|

f|f>de f>ba|f>de f>gf|e>cd e>af|eca HA2 A/2d/2|

d>fe f>dd|f>af g>ef|gab a>fd|eBc d2 d/2B/2|

ABG F<Ad/2f/2|f>af g>ef|g>ab afd|e<Bc d2|]

 

Nice tune, Peter, however is it Dumblane, or more likely, Dunblane? Methinks, also that the Q value: 3/8=100, is too fast. 80 is better. :)

 

Chris

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Nice tune, Peter, however is it Dumblane, or more likely, Dunblane? Methinks, also that the Q value: 3/8=100, is too fast. 80 is better. :)

 

You have a copy of Benjamin Rose Chris, in both that book and the modern tune book I found this version in the name is Dumblane. Q: values are a bit of a mess if you use on-line ABC converters, get yourself some proper (free!) software to handle ABC!

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Nice tune, Peter, however is it Dumblane, or more likely, Dunblane? Methinks, also that the Q value: 3/8=100, is too fast. 80 is better. :)

 

You have a copy of Benjamin Rose Chris, in both that book and the modern tune book I found this version in the name is Dumblane. Q: values are a bit of a mess if you use on-line ABC converters, get yourself some proper (free!) software to handle ABC!

 

The tune title in the book is indeed "Dumblane". However, the lyric quoted on the right of the page reads "While lonely I stray in the calm summer gloaming, to muse on sweet Jessie, the Flow'r of Dunblane".

 

The town in the present day is known as Dunblane.

 

regards

 

John Wild

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The town in the present day is known as Dunblane.

 

regards

 

John Wild

 

Instructions from the VMP for transcriptions are unequivocal, transpose as found. It's written as Dumblane so it remains as Dumblane. Anyone unhappy with that should voice complaints to the Village Music Project directly, end of.

 

Odd one this because it's not a VMP project at all and they will probably dismiss all comments out of hand. I'm beginning to wish I'd never got involved.

 

Perhaps the intelligentsia would like to submit their own transcriptions and have done with it? Whatever, as far as I'm concerned the matter is closed.

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I'm truly sorry if my last post sounds bad tempered but that's probably because it is. If people have issues with the accuracy of a published work perhaps they should consider taking the matter up with the authors of the publication?

 

I think 'Something for the Weekend' just died!

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Further research has uncovered the following information. The song is called Jesse, The Flower of Dunblane and was written by Robert Tannahill. However, the tune to accompany it, is called Jesse, The Flower o Dumblane and is an air that was composed by Robert Archibald Smith (1780-1829). Smith was the son of a weaver who became a noted composer. He published several works and became the musical conductor of St George's Church, Edinburgh.

 

So, it would appear that the tune title, is correct, though probably a mis-spelling, since the tune was written after the words were written.

 

Chris

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The town in the present day is known as Dunblane.

 

regards

 

John Wild

 

Instructions from the VMP for transcriptions are unequivocal, transpose as found. It's written as Dumblane so it remains as Dumblane. Anyone unhappy with that should voice complaints to the Village Music Project directly, end of.

 

Odd one this because it's not a VMP project at all and they will probably dismiss all comments out of hand. I'm beginning to wish I'd never got involved.

 

Perhaps the intelligentsia would like to submit their own transcriptions and have done with it? Whatever, as far as I'm concerned the matter is closed.

 

I never said i was unhappy with it - I was only drawing attentio m n :) to the differences

 

best wishes

 

- John

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So, it would appear that the tune title, is correct, though probably a mis-spelling, since the tune was written after the words were written.

 

Chris

Indeed so Chris. The temptation to say 'No shit Sherlock' is, in fact, quite irresistible!

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So, it would appear that the tune title, is correct, though probably a mis-spelling, since the tune was written after the words were written.

 

Chris

Indeed so Chris. The temptation to say 'No shit Sherlock' is, in fact, quite irresistible!

Really....

 

Look folks: It is standard scholarly procedure to transcribe things as they stand. Once you decide to change anything you are making an edition. Frankly, I don't care what the town name is, and that is immaterial. What is material is that Peter quite properly transcribed what the page said. We can have a long scholarly discussion of how appropriate that is depending on what sort of public one assumes for the result, but I think Peter said above quite clearly what needs to be said.

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Look folks: It is standard scholarly procedure to transcribe things as they stand. Once you decide to change anything you are making an edition. Frankly, I don't care what the town name is, and that is immaterial. What is material is that Peter quite properly transcribed what the page said. We can have a long scholarly discussion of how appropriate that is depending on what sort of public one assumes for the result, but I think Peter said above quite clearly what needs to be said.

Quite right of course.

I mean wot abaht that horses for saucers chappie.

"It is a pity that Chawcer, who had geneyus, was so unedicated. He's the wuss speller I know of."

(Artemus Ward, Artemus Ward in London, 1867)

 

Not sure wot Cackston used for rools when he printed up the Miller's Tale but here it is followed by the 'edited and adapted' version with a rush of bellows' air to get us going:

 

This Nicholas anon leet fle a fart,

As greet as it had been a thonder-dent,

That with the strook he was almoost yblent;

And he was redy with his iren hoot,

And Nicholas amydde the ers he smoot,...

 

... And Nicholas is scalded in the towte.

This tale is doon, and God save al the rowte!

Can't find my copy just now (perhaps someone else has itone to check) but

ed/adapted/translated version of last lines(by Nevill Coghill if memory serves):

something like:

This Nicholas just then let fly a fart: As loud as it had been a thunder-clap, And well-nigh blinded Absalom, poor chap; But he was ready with his iron hot.....

 

"And Nicholas is branded on the bum, And God bring all of us to Kingdom Come!"

 

Tho apparently it was a bassoonist not a bass concertinist who delivered the thunderclap (search here for bassoonist)

http://www.penguinclassics.co.uk/nf/shared/WebDisplay/0,,48994_1_10,00.html

 

 

 

And Dumnbllayne is still a lovely tune. Tku and stand tall TallShip!or I shud say: "Stand Tall My Captain, My Captain!" (with due thanks to Robin Williams of course:)

Edited by Kautilya

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Look folks: It is standard scholarly procedure to transcribe things as they stand. Once you decide to change anything you are making an edition. Frankly, I don't care what the town name is, and that is immaterial. What is material is that Peter quite properly transcribed what the page said. We can have a long scholarly discussion of how appropriate that is depending on what sort of public one assumes for the result, but I think Peter said above quite clearly what needs to be said.

Quite right of course.

I mean wot abaht that horses for saucers chappie.

"It is a pity that Chawcer, who had geneyus, was so unedicated. He's the wuss speller I know of."

(Artemus Ward, Artemus Ward in London, 1867)

 

Not sure wot Cackston used for rools when he printed up the Miller's Tale but here it is followed by the 'edited and adapted' version with a rush of bellows' air to get us going:

 

This Nicholas anon leet fle a fart,

As greet as it had been a thonder-dent,

That with the strook he was almoost yblent;

And he was redy with his iren hoot,

And Nicholas amydde the ers he smoot,...

 

... And Nicholas is scalded in the towte.

This tale is doon, and God save al the rowte!

Can't find my copy just now (perhaps someone else has itone to check) but

ed/adapted/translated version of last lines(by Nevill Coghill if memory serves):

something like:

This Nicholas just then let fly a fart: As loud as it had been a thunder-clap, And well-nigh blinded Absalom, poor chap; But he was ready with his iron hot.....

 

"And Nicholas is branded on the bum, And God bring all of us to Kingdom Come!"

 

Tho apparently it was a bassoonist not a bass concertinist who delivered the thunderclap (search here for bassoonist)

http://www.penguinclassics.co.uk/nf/shared/WebDisplay/0,,48994_1_10,00.html

 

 

 

And Dumnbllayne is still a lovely tune. Tku and stand tall TallShip!or I shud say: "Stand Tall My Captain, My Captain!" (with due thanks to Robin Williams of course:)

 

I love the sentiment (no, really, thank you very much!) but perhaps you should take a little more water with it :o ;) !

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name='tallship' timestamp='1338329589' post='136475']

00.html

 

 

 

And Dumnbllayne is still a lovely tune. Tku and stand tall TallShip!or I shud say: "Stand Tall My Captain, My Captain!" (with due thanks to Robin Williams of course:)

 

I love the sentiment (no, really, thank you very much!) but perhaps you should take a little more water with it :o ;) !

Prefer my meffs straight but price has gone up so maybe some home made aquaLucasvit could be added :(

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Barrenttine-Products-Ltd-Methylated-Spirit/dp/B0041WAY1I/ref=sr_1_2?s=diy&ie=UTF8&qid=1338402924&sr=1-2

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