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Does anyone on this forum play their concertina strictly NON-folk?

 

I would think a chromatic has such potential to do many things, the limitations of keeping only to traditional styles associated with it are quite restrictive although of course, one is a free agent to choose what one plays.

 

If there are any players who avoid Morris and Irish airs and reels (though I have to say I do really like a lot of the tunes) could they show their head above the parapet and say just what you do play?

 

'Intrigued' of Yorkshire

 

Foxy

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Does anyone on this forum play their concertina strictly NON-folk?

 

I would think a chromatic has such potential to do many things, the limitations of keeping only to traditional styles associated with it are quite restrictive although of course, one is a free agent to choose what one plays.

 

If there are any players who avoid Morris and Irish airs and reels (though I have to say I do really like a lot of the tunes) could they show their head above the parapet and say just what you do play?

 

'Intrigued' of Yorkshire

 

Foxy

I don't play any of the other stuff, except with an occasional foray into JS Bach as far as my memory and ear will take me, but often find myself wondering how some of the early Cream ( Eric Clapton and crew) could make it on to the box. Dave Townsend has done some lovely classical stuff, as I am sure have many English concertina players. On an album of Johnny Og Connelly (Button Accordion) and Charlie Lennon, Johnny plays a brilliant rendition of the first section of Bach's Partita #1(I believe) In E Major, which is rather a show off piece for upcoming violinists. If he can do that on a button accordion, I expect the possibilities are pretty wide.

Purple Haze anyone? B)

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Does anyone on this forum play their concertina strictly NON-folk?

 

I would think a chromatic has such potential to do many things, the limitations of keeping only to traditional styles associated with it are quite restrictive although of course, one is a free agent to choose what one plays.

 

If there are any players who avoid Morris and Irish airs and reels (though I have to say I do really like a lot of the tunes) could they show their head above the parapet and say just what you do play?

 

'Intrigued' of Yorkshire

 

Foxy

Run for your life!!!

 

Having said that, I generally follow the trend of the instrument, whatever is easier.

My 2 row Hohner Pokerwork likes German-ish Waltzes, Scottish, French tunes.

To my surprize it doesn't like Russian tunes at all.

My 20 button Lachenal likes French tunes in A min. Go figure.

My 30 button Jackie likes chordal classical pieces. My 30 button Jack likes Klezmer single melody style. Sounds very Jewish, very haunting.

My 2/5 row Hohner Overture likes Tango, it's my Bandoneon substitute-to-be now that it's fixed.

My 120 button B system Chromatic really dislikes me. Big time life's heartbreak.

I can't listen to much of Irish, it often sounds like a bunch of unconnected notes to me. But I am melting from the sound of Scottish music, although I have the difficulties replicating the melodies in my head, they're foreign to me.

Listen to the tune page. There is alot of classical pieces, and some non-Irish tunes as well. Most is "Irish" though. Very popular nowadays. And I don't think it's the "Riverdance" show. It's been popular before that. Actually I think that success of the "Riverdance" is due to preceeding popularity of Irish music.

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Whatever sounds like fun for me. Right now I'm pairing up with an oboe player in the neighborhood on Pachelbel's Canon in D, and a couple of klezmer tunes, Yoshke Yoshke and Tangissimo. EC and oboe sound really nice together. B) Based on my seasons of blade shearing in Scotland, I just finished working up a Highland version of a great old Aussie shearing song, Shearing In A Bar by Duke Tritton. I enjoy American and Scottish folk - strathspeys and reels, slow airs, ballads, Scots Gaelic songs, etc. - and a fair number of Irish songs that were popular in the Highlands.

 

However, as I pointed out on another thread, I find Irish reel-to-reel playing (or jig-to-jig, for that matter) boring and oppressive, <_< so I studiously avoid anything labeled "Irish Seisiun." :P

Edited by yankeeclipper
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Well there are some mighty fine "classical" players here and a little jog over to the recorded links page has some very interesting material that is anything but "folk".

 

I myself am on an Irish bender! At times I wander off into old-time country music, bluegrass and acadian. Contentment, and with a fine single malt scotch... ;) .

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Does anyone on this forum play their concertina strictly NON-folk?

 

I would think a chromatic has such potential to do many things, the limitations of keeping only to traditional styles associated with it are quite restrictive although of course, one is a free agent to choose what one plays.

 

If there are any players who avoid Morris and Irish airs and reels (though I have to say I do really like a lot of the tunes) could they show their head above the parapet and say just what you do play?

 

'Intrigued' of Yorkshire

 

I play "non-folk", lots of it. But "strictly"? No way!

 

On concertina, I've performed Bach, Telemann, Purcell, Stephen Foster, Bugs Bower, and more. I've substituted (still on concertina, though in rehearsal, not performance) in a friend's string quartet when the second violin was indisposed. I've joined (by invitation) in a friend's rock performance. The fact that I've played (and danced) Irish, Morris, English country, New England contra, Swedish, and Danish traditions has not been an impediment. Quite the opposite.

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I'm another 'anything that takes my fancy' merchant. Current favourite place to trawl for new music is www.mutopiaproject.org where lots of altruistic folk (and a few self-serving music students) have uploaded pdfs of classical music, so I can try it out without cost to see if it fits my instrument and abilities.

 

I'm definitely NOT a folkie but I have a reserve of jolly trad tunes I'll settle down and knock out for half an hour once in a while.

 

Edited to point out that I was surprised to discover that Mutopia actually does have a trad section where someone has placed lots of cheery looking Swedish stuff, among others. 'Anonymous' is curious at times too.

Edited by Dirge
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I'll play just about anything That I an find on the keyboard. I like being able to have a tune in my head and be able to go to the instrument and pick it out on the spot.

 

I recently strung together a medley of TV theme songs from my childhood: The Flintstones theme is quite fun on concertina, as is I Dream of Jeannie, The Odd Couple, and Bewitched.

 

Also the Ennio Morricone musics from the Clint Eastwood Spaghetti Westerns sound cool on concertina.

 

Erik Satie's rather fey melodies, Trois Gymnopedia and the Gnossienne are very beautiful when played by more skilled concertinists than me...

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Hmm - re-reading my original post even with just 2 earlier replies in, made me think that 'strictly' may have been too harsh a word since a couple have taken it so literally. Maybe I meant that there are players who play non-folk music and find it as good an instrument as those who play folk - in the same way that a clarinet can be lyrical in symphonic settings, and it can be as at home in a Klezmer setting (albeit played in a different style).

 

I think of it as having such potential and I'm pleased to see that players are expanding the use to wide extremes (Flintstones to Purple Haze if these could be considered widths of extreme). When I've learned more on the playing side of things I'd certainly lke to do some experimental things in different genres of music.

 

BTW I'm doing English at the moment although with a careful guiding hand I was able to render a tune on the Anglo (to my amazement!) at a recent visit to a 'tinaphile's house!

 

Input much appreciated. Thanks.

 

Foxy

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On one memorable Morris week-end, that fine Jeffries duet player Nick Robertshaw played for his Morris side all day Saturday, played and sang Procul Harem's "Whiter Shade of Pale" in the evening and on Sunday morning played Pachebels's Canon.

I thought that showed the concertina as a pretty flexible instrument

Robin

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Hmm - re-reading my original post even with just 2 earlier replies in, made me think that 'strictly' may have been too harsh a word since a couple have taken it so literally. Maybe I meant that there are players who play non-folk music and find it as good an instrument as those who play folk...

Now you're cookin'! Of course! :)

 

...I'm pleased to see that players are expanding the use to wide extremes...

I don't think of that as "expanding"... because I've never thought of it as being restricted. As for what you call "extremes", I would simply call them "variety"... something that I consider natural, and not extreme at all. (Not even when it includes forms of "music" which I don't like. B))

 

Destroying an instrument -- especially a vintage Jeffries or Wheatstone -- on stage... that's what I would call "extreme". :o

 

BTW I'm doing English at the moment although with a careful guiding hand I was able to render a tune on the Anglo (to my amazement!) at a recent visit to a 'tinaphile's house!

Better watch out.

If you're not careful, you'll be trying a duet next!
;)

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