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Found: Concertina


Resalg
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We are not musicians, but my wife and I just found her former husband's (deceased) concertina and are hoping to get a rough estimate of its value. The keys are discolored, and the strap around the case is well-worn, but other than that the instrument itself seems to be in good condition. It also seems to have good, strong tones.

 

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Looks like a 32-key rosewood Lachenal anglo, badged for another dealer. In good condition these are going for a good bit, but the usual answer here is that condition makes a difference. Old ones almost always need some work (pads, tuning, valves, fix any small leaks) for a few hundred dollars/pounds. What part of the world are you in? We could direct you to someone who can look it over and be more specific.

 

Ken

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It's worth over a thousand dollars. Worth less than three thousand dollars. The bellows look lovely.

If all it needs is tuning and valves replaced -- and if it has steel reeds -- then over two thousand.

Probably... maybe... hopefully. Appraisal at a distance is woeful but even at first hand it is seldom exact.

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Thanks for the help! It looks like we need to find someone locally who can inspect the concertina with their own hands and eyes. So far our search on the internet and in the phone book has been fruitless.

Contact our San Diego concertina players.

They will be able to play it and see what needs doing. They might even buy it.

search here for San Diego

gohere

http://www.concertina.net/forums/index.php?showtopic=14889

:)

Edited by Kautilya
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The best person to contact in San Diego regarding an anglo concertina is Michael Eskin. He is a member of the forum. If you go to the "Teaching/Learning" forum where he has posted recently, you can click on the name "eskin". That will send you to a page where you can find his contact information. He is an expert anglo player; he could inspect and play your instrument to give you an idea of its condition.

 

I play the English concertina. I would not be able to judge the condition of your instrument very well.

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Thanks, Ken!

 

We're in Carlsbad, San Diego County, California.

 

That instrument has had a long journey from Nottingham ... wouldn't it be great if a concertina could tell it's own tale.

 

Chris

 

Since my wife does not remember seeing the concertina nor seeing her first husband playing it, it seems it must have belonged to his father who not only was from England but served as secretary to the British ambassador in China during the 20's and 30's. What a tale it could tell, eh what?

 

:D

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The best person to contact in San Diego regarding an anglo concertina is Michael Eskin. He is a member of the forum. If you go to the "Teaching/Learning" forum where he has posted recently, you can click on the name "eskin". That will send you to a page where you can find his contact information. He is an expert anglo player; he could inspect and play your instrument to give you an idea of its condition.

 

I play the English concertina. I would not be able to judge the condition of your instrument very well.

 

Thank you, Mary! I've written to Mr. Eskin.

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The bolt extensions look like thick aluminium washers, (perhaps electrical "stand-offs") to counteract the 'bottoming' of the bolt threads either due to the wrong length bolts having been used as replacements or because the wood of the end frames/ends has been compressed by previous over tightening of the bolts and thus the bolts were sitting too deep and not enough length of threaded section to pull the ends closed.

 

Pretty wordy sentence. :unsure:

Edited by Geoff Wooff
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The bolt extensions look like thick aluminium washers, (perhaps electrical "stand-offs") to counteract the 'bottoming' of the bolt threads either due to the wrong length bolts having been used as replacements or because the wood of the end frames/ends has been compressed by previous over tightening of the bolts and thus the bolts were sitting too deep and not enough length of threaded section to pull the ends closed.

 

Pretty wordy sentence. :unsure:

... and elegant

 

The bolt heads would certainly give a good grip into your palms when playing standing up, I wonder if the original owner had matching holes in the hands.

 

Adrian

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The bolt extensions look like thick aluminium washers, (perhaps electrical "stand-offs") to counteract the 'bottoming' of the bolt threads either due to the wrong length bolts having been used as replacements or because the wood of the end frames/ends has been compressed by previous over tightening of the bolts and thus the bolts were sitting too deep and not enough length of threaded section to pull the ends closed.

 

Pretty wordy sentence. :unsure:

 

In agreement Geoff

See attachment

 

Geoffrey

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