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The Evolution of Concertina - Flowchart


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Posted (edited)

I've recently read some articles on concertina.com, as well as Dan Worral's The Anglo-German Concertina: A Social History, and I've got a rough idea of the history of these lovely instruments. But I haven't seen a flowchart yet that helps me remember these (did I miss it?), so I made one.

 

Scan2022-05-13_111623.thumb.jpg.1570c2dcb06cb53b871a5b5da47502f1.jpg

 

I don't have the confidence to guarantee that I didn't make a mistake in this chart. So, please point out anything which is not in the right way in your reply. Sorry for making this flowchart by hand, I may make a digital version later.

 

P.S. Everything can be ignored if it's not written in English - they're my own note in my language!

Edited by LazyNetter
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There's also the modern 'hybrid' concertinas (starting with the Wheatstone "May Fair" I believe) that incorporate German-style mass produced accordion reeds into English-style concertinas, most often with an Anglo keyboard layout. Some of these hybrids are now being manufactured in China.

 

Also the "Franglo" concertina invented by Emmanuel Pariselle and Colin Dipper, which has a melodeon-inspired keyboard layout in something that looks like and has similar construction methods to an English concertina.

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I think the chart is very good and deserves to be fully developed in a digital version.

 

Should Jeffries Duet be regarded as descended only from Jerries Anglo or also from other Duets?

 

If I understand correctly, Wicky and Hayden are slightly different and were invented independently, so perhaps they deserve separate boxes. I'm not sure where the lines should be to show where those two kinds came from.

 

Some other button layouts have been discussed here, such as piano-style* and Anglos with a few "Duet" buttons. I'm not sure whether they deserve to be included.

 

* I've seen one here very recently but can't find it now.

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37 minutes ago, Richard Mellish said:

If I understand correctly, Wicky and Hayden are slightly different and were invented independently

 

Indeed, three differences that I can think of:

  • Wicky conceived (and built) his instrument as a large cube (like a bandoneon or a chemnitzer). Hayden’s is a smaller polygonal concertina.
  • The rows of keys on a Wicky are parallel with the edges. Hayden’s specification calls for “[t]he rows to slope down at an angle of 10.5 degrees towards the thumbs.”
  • The left-hand sides of the two systems are mirror images of each other: Wicky’s system has the lower notes closer to the thumbs on both sides, while Hayden’s has the lower notes closer to the left edges of both sides.

Wicky (apologies for the out-of-focus of the images. I did not take these pictures):

 

P1030453a.jpg?raw=1

 

P1030456.JPG?raw=1

 

P1030463.JPG?raw=1

 

 

 

Hayden (I did take this picture):

 

Haydens.jpg?raw=1

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I have to say I never considered a 'flow chart' of free reed history!

It certainly raises the profile of these instruments to another level completely. Do not apologise for doing design by hand; as it is refreshing to see such thought and care being out into such an unusual concept. Incidentally, where would those rebel constructed ( homemade) concertinas fit? The ones someone has attempted to make themselves?

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On 5/13/2022 at 3:07 PM, alex_holden said:

There's also the modern 'hybrid' concertinas (starting with the Wheatstone "May Fair" I believe) that incorporate German-style mass produced accordion reeds into English-style concertinas, most often with an Anglo keyboard layout. Some of these hybrids are now being manufactured in China.

 

Also the "Franglo" concertina invented by Emmanuel Pariselle and Colin Dipper, which has a melodeon-inspired keyboard layout in something that looks like and has similar construction methods to an English concertina.

 

I aware the hybrid instrument, it's not only because I'm playing one but am also living in China. Since multiple of these concertinas, English, Hayden duet, 20b, both Jeffries and Wheatstone/Lachenal Layout Anglo have the hybrid models, it's gonna be tricky to arrange all these categories together in one chart. Maybe I'll figure a smarter way to put them in one or more charts.

 

I have seen the Franglo and other systems which not popular on some webpages, but their informations are not as plenty as all the systems I've put in the chart. Obviously I need more readings!

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On 5/13/2022 at 5:03 PM, Richard Mellish said:

I think the chart is very good and deserves to be fully developed in a digital version.

 

Should Jeffries Duet be regarded as descended only from Jerries Anglo or also from other Duets?

 

If I understand correctly, Wicky and Hayden are slightly different and were invented independently, so perhaps they deserve separate boxes. I'm not sure where the lines should be to show where those two kinds came from.

 

Some other button layouts have been discussed here, such as piano-style* and Anglos with a few "Duet" buttons. I'm not sure whether they deserve to be included.

 

* I've seen one here very recently but can't find it now.

 

What I thought about was, all kinds of the duet concertinas share the same "duet idea," so I put all of them into the duet section. But I think you are right, it's make sense that the early duets made some influence to the Jeffries. I think I should find some details about this, or do you have some of those on your hand?

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1 hour ago, LazyNetter said:

 

 

What I thought about was, all kinds of the duet concertinas share the same "duet idea," so I put all of them into the duet section. But I think you are right, it's make sense that the early duets made some influence to the Jeffries. I think I should find some details about this, or do you have some of those on your hand?

Sorry, I don't have any details. As I understand it, the basic principle of a Jeffries Duet is to put what would be the push notes and pull notes of an Anglo on separate rows. But I am sure others on here can provide much more detail.

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On 5/13/2022 at 8:07 AM, alex_holden said:

There's also the modern 'hybrid' concertinas (starting with the Wheatstone "May Fair" I believe) that incorporate German-style mass produced accordion reeds into English-style concertinas, most often with an Anglo keyboard layout. Some of these hybrids are now being manufactured in China.

 

 

The reeds I've seen in Wheatstone Mayfair instruments look more like Italian than German in origin.  No makers mark that I've seen so it's hard to be sure.  They also have every indication of being hand made type reeds, rather than cheap mass produced ones.  Modern hybrid makes use a wide range of reed qualities.

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