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Theme Of The Month, April 2015: Your Newest


Jim Besser
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gravitas is fine with me, but right now I prefer the sweetness of the highest notes in the Suttner version...

 

However, beautiful playing, not to my surprise!

 

Best wishes - Wolf

 

 

 

I've been working on a lot of renaissance pieces recently, and here's one of the most well known renaissance chansons: Josquin's Mille Regretz. I am amazed sometimes how easily this sort of material fits under the fingers on an anglo. That said, I decided to use a lot of bellows reversals on this piece, to facilitate the fingering which gave the usual problem of little swells at every reversal. So it was a good exercise to try to get on top of these and keep the lines flowing nicely. I've recorded two versions, the first on a Bbf and the second, a forth lower on an FC (tenor). I find it's easier to control this piece at the higher pitch, but it sounds like it has a lot more gravitas lower (and when Mr Dipper has finished my baritone I'll be able to get even more gravitas...). What do you think? Any preferences? Next, I'll have to try to incorporate some diminutions on at least the top line!

 

 

LOvely. I love Bb/Fs, but the FC is sublime in this tune.

 

 

Thanks both of you, for me the jury's still out on the best sized anglo to play this on. I like the low sound a lot, but the slowness of the reeds mean that you tend to give a bit more welly at each bellows reversal, which makes the little swells in dynamics more interfering to the phrasing. It's a great piece to practise bellows control and I hope I've learnt something in the process. What do duet players think - I imagine they are confronted by these sort of things more often when having to make a bellows reversal in the middle of a full chorded phrase?

 

Adrian

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I heard this tune about a month ago at a concert in Philadelphia by the young Irish group Full Set . I liked the song, but didn't get the name. The only thing I heard in the title was "Horse" and that it was written by an accordion player from Chicago .So I typed in "horse, accordion, Chicago" and bingo, first hit on the list was "Horse Keane's Hornpipe" by Jimmy Keane. Horse was his father - I presume he either looked like a horse, worked with horses, or liked the racetrack...

 

Here it is on my Morse Anglo CG. I am trying to play it in an Irish style, throwing in occasional ornamentation, but definitely a WIP

 

https://youtu.be/xDiGH9Ki-eY

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I heard this tune about a month ago at a concert in Philadelphia by the young Irish group Full Set . I liked the song, but didn't get the name. The only thing I heard in the title was "Horse" and that it was written by an accordion player from Chicago .So I typed in "horse, accordion, Chicago" and bingo, first hit on the list was "Horse Keane's Hornpipe" by Jimmy Keane. Horse was his father - I presume he either looked like a horse, worked with horses, or liked the racetrack...

 

Here it is on my Morse Anglo CG. I am trying to play it in an Irish style, throwing in occasional ornamentation, but definitely a WIP

 

https://youtu.be/xDiGH9Ki-eY

 

VEry nice tune - I hadn't heard it before. A lovely version on SPotify by Jimmy Keane. Gotta put that on my 'must learn' list.

 

And nicely played. You're progressing rapidly!

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Work in progress, continued: I always planned to play John Dipper's beautiful Veron and Marcel's Schottische with Ian Stephenson's Return from Helsinki, and The Squeezers have this on our todo list, so I've been working on the two together.

 

Here's a first take.

 

In listening to it, I don't think the diminished chord, or whatever it is (music theory is not among my strengths) , at the end of several sections works, and I plan to eliminate it.

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I wanted to get this arrangement finished before a retirement party I went to a few weeks ago. It never made it and still isn't there, but here is a first go.

 

Any advice as to how to not make my bellows sound like I am drowning when I need to release the air hole would be appreciated. Subtlety of bellows control is obviously not one of my strengths :)

 

When I'm Sixty Four by the Beatles

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v2k_fBPwLe8

 

Anglo GD Morse

 

 

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I wanted to get this arrangement finished before a retirement party I went to a few weeks ago. It never made it and still isn't there, but here is a first go.

 

Any advice as to how to not make my bellows sound like I am drowning when I need to release the air hole would be appreciated. Subtlety of bellows control is obviously not one of my strengths :)

 

When I'm Sixty Four by the Beatles

 

 

I wasn't going to post this, but you forced my hand. (very nice, by the way).

 

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/68325595/C.net%20Tune%20of%20the%20Month/maxwell2.MP3

 

At Morris practice recently they were doing Bampton stepping practice, and I started playing this quietly. It sort of works.

 

In a manner of speaking.

 

Maxwell's Silver Hammer as a Morris tune.

Edited by Jim Besser
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I wanted to get this arrangement finished before a retirement party I went to a few weeks ago. It never made it and still isn't there, but here is a first go.

 

Any advice as to how to not make my bellows sound like I am drowning when I need to release the air hole would be appreciated. Subtlety of bellows control is obviously not one of my strengths :)

 

When I'm Sixty Four by the Beatles

 

 

I wasn't going to post this, but you forced my hand. (very nice, by the way).

 

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/68325595/C.net%20Tune%20of%20the%20Month/maxwell2.MP3

 

At Morris practice recently they were doing Bampton stepping practice, and I started playing this quietly. It sort of works.

 

In a manner of speaking.

 

Maxwell's Silver Hammer as a Morris tune.

 

That sounds great Jim- I think I will steal your version!

 

Actually this is one time I am glad I don't sing. Nice song but bizarre lyrics.

Edited by Daria
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Now that I've at least half recovered I focussed on my being part of discovering the amazing world of the "Dahlhoff" collection...

 

So if someone might fancy listening to one (resp. two) of "my newest", please follow this link...!

 

Best wishes - Wolf

 

P.S.: Will post directly here too, with a set of Irish Polkas (two of them new to me) soon...

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Now that I've at least half recovered I focussed on my being part of discovering the amazing world of the "Dahlhoff" collection...

 

So if someone might fancy listening to one (resp. two) of "my newest", please follow this link...!

 

Best wishes - Wolf

 

P.S.: Will post directly here too, with a set of Irish Polkas (two of them new to me) soon...

 

VEry nice. Very classical sounding. I wouldn't have thought GErman, but not sure where I would have placed it.

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I heard this tune about a month ago at a concert in Philadelphia by the young Irish group Full Set . I liked the song, but didn't get the name. The only thing I heard in the title was "Horse" and that it was written by an accordion player from Chicago .So I typed in "horse, accordion, Chicago" and bingo, first hit on the list was "Horse Keane's Hornpipe" by Jimmy Keane. Horse was his father - I presume he either looked like a horse, worked with horses, or liked the racetrack...

 

Here it is on my Morse Anglo CG. I am trying to play it in an Irish style, throwing in occasional ornamentation, but definitely a WIP

 

https://youtu.be/xDiGH9Ki-eY

 

Wow - I wrote that I "hadn't heard it before." Then I played it and it all came back: I learned it years ago from the late Michael Reid, an early C.net participant, bandmate and NESI roomie. I'm pretty sure it was one of the tunes he played masterfully on English, and then relearned on Anglo.

 

A great tune.

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Now that I've at least half recovered I focussed on my being part of discovering the amazing world of the "Dahlhoff" collection...

 

So if someone might fancy listening to one (resp. two) of "my newest", please follow this link...!

 

Best wishes - Wolf

 

P.S.: Will post directly here too, with a set of Irish Polkas (two of them new to me) soon...

Very nicely done Wolf. Looking forward to hearing some more soon.

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Here's a very, very new one: I've recorded this version to sing along with in the car to learn the words, so the accompaniment is ultra-simple - I expect it to evolve a fair amount:

 

https://soundcloud.com/lachenaliamusic/florilla

 

Another very appealing ballad, Stuart - and the three-chord-accompaniment is pretty effective for a start...

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