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Can you i.d. this concertina?

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Learned about a concertina offered by someone who normally sells guitars. (My main instrument.) He knows nothing about concertinas, just says this is a new concertina, 20 buttons (he said 21, but even as a newbie I know that's 20 + the air button), has no manufacturer's name, but it has "birds & a globe" on it. I've asked him to check the instrument's range, but haven't yet heard more from him. Possibly that's because I said I would check online trying to locate more about it. He picked the instrument up in buying a job lot of guitars.

 

I know people are going to want to see the concertina, but I've only talked with him by phone & he doesn't do email. He's a few hours drive, so I'm not eager to go if this isn't worth pursuing. I have a beginner C/G Anglo, but would love a lower Anglo, like a D, both to match my voice & personal preference. I suspect it may be a Chinese import.

 

Anybody have any information that might help?

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He knows nothing about concertinas, just says this is a new concertina, ...... has no manufacturer's name, but it has "birds & a globe" on it.

....I suspect it may be a Chinese import.

Otherwise known as firewood, and about as much use as a chocolate teapot. Don't touch it.

Much better to deal with a company that knows about concertinas.

Try the Button Box - you can get decent anglos in C/G and G/D suitable for beginners and yet will last you a bit beyond that stage too.

http://www.buttonbox.com/other-concertinas.html#anglo

 

 

 

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He knows nothing about concertinas, just says this is a new concertina, ...... has no manufacturer's name, but it has "birds & a globe" on it.

....I suspect it may be a Chinese import.

Otherwise known as firewood, and about as much use as a chocolate teapot. Don't touch it.

Much better to deal with a company that knows about concertinas.

Try the Button Box - you can get decent anglos in C/G and G/D suitable for beginners and yet will last you a bit beyond that stage too.

http://www.buttonbox...inas.html#anglo

 

 

 

 

Thanks, Steve. The Chinese import idea is just a guess, but it's probable. I'd love to hear somebody else recognize it, but the fact that there's no manufacturer's name leaves me suspecting the worst. . . but still hopeful, unfortunately.

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I think that it might be a Scholer, an old East German make (see below). There are lots of new-looking ones still floating around. They're typically pretty bad instruments.

 

garmoshka3.jpg

 

He knows nothing about concertinas, just says this is a new concertina, ...... has no manufacturer's name, but it has "birds & a globe" on it.

....I suspect it may be a Chinese import.

Otherwise known as firewood, and about as much use as a chocolate teapot. Don't touch it.

Much better to deal with a company that knows about concertinas.

Try the Button Box - you can get decent anglos in C/G and G/D suitable for beginners and yet will last you a bit beyond that stage too.

http://www.buttonbox...inas.html#anglo

 

 

 

 

Thanks, Steve. The Chinese import idea is just a guess, but it's probable. I'd love to hear somebody else recognize it, but the fact that there's no manufacturer's name leaves me suspecting the worst. . . but still hopeful, unfortunately.

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Daniel,

Thanks so much for the picture. It definitely looks like what he was trying to describe. It also looks like this is a good instrument to pass. Think I'll go over to another forum to see how to judge a used concertina. I know about bellows & buttons, but obviously there's more to know. I tend to get around a bit where some might be.

LoiS

 

I think that it might be a Scholer, an old East German make (see below). There are lots of new-looking ones still floating around. They're typically pretty bad instruments.

 

garmoshka3.jpg

 

He knows nothing about concertinas, just says this is a new concertina, ...... has no manufacturer's name, but it has "birds & a globe" on it.

....I suspect it may be a Chinese import.

Otherwise known as firewood, and about as much use as a chocolate teapot. Don't touch it.

Much better to deal with a company that knows about concertinas.

Try the Button Box - you can get decent anglos in C/G and G/D suitable for beginners and yet will last you a bit beyond that stage too.

http://www.buttonbox...inas.html#anglo

 

 

 

 

Thanks, Steve. The Chinese import idea is just a guess, but it's probable. I'd love to hear somebody else recognize it, but the fact that there's no manufacturer's name leaves me suspecting the worst. . . but still hopeful, unfortunately.

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Daniel,

Thanks so much for the picture. It definitely looks like what he was trying to describe. It also looks like this is a good instrument to pass. Think I'll go over to another forum to see how to judge a used concertina. I know about bellows & buttons, but obviously there's more to know. I tend to get around a bit where some might be.

LoiS

Scholer concertinas are definitely very nasty things indeed. They are little more than a toy, and a bad one at that. I made the mistake of buying one once very many years ago. It was almost unplayable. Stiff and wheezy, very badly tuned. It lasted a few weeks until one of the brass reeds broke.

 

Another forum? Which one? This one is as good as it gets. Take the time to explore all the options. Here's a couple to get you started.....

http://www.concertina.net/guide.html

http://www.concertina.net/guide_wherebuy.html

 

 

 

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I have a Scholer that's actually playable (though it's a lot of work to play) but I've heard lots of stories like Steve's about Scholers that are basically worthless.

 

From your earlier post it sounds like you're looking for a G/D Anglo. If so, would a 20-button be adequate, or do you need 30?

 

Daniel,

Thanks so much for the picture. It definitely looks like what he was trying to describe. It also looks like this is a good instrument to pass. Think I'll go over to another forum to see how to judge a used concertina. I know about bellows & buttons, but obviously there's more to know. I tend to get around a bit where some might be.

LoiS

Scholer concertinas are definitely very nasty things indeed. They are little more than a toy, and a bad one at that. I made the mistake of buying one once very many years ago. It was almost unplayable. Stiff and wheezy, very badly tuned. It lasted a few weeks until one of the brass reeds broke.

 

Another forum? Which one? This one is as good as it gets. Take the time to explore all the options. Here's a couple to get you started.....

http://www.concertina.net/guide.html

http://www.concertina.net/guide_wherebuy.html

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I would also say it's a Scholer. I had one made about 1993, just before they went out of business. It wasn't too bad at all. Quite a few that I've seen are in G/D, and are octave tuned (2 reeds per note) which is an interesting sound. I only paid $45 dollars for it, and it was in as-new condition. For that price it was worth having. I've since passed it on to a museum friend who is using it in a World War I "Music in the Trenches" school program at his museum.

 

 

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I would also say it's a Scholer. I had one made about 1993, just before they went out of business. It wasn't too bad at all. Quite a few that I've seen are in G/D, and are octave tuned (2 reeds per note) which is an interesting sound. I only paid $45 dollars for it, and it was in as-new condition. For that price it was worth having. I've since passed it on to a museum friend who is using it in a World War I "Music in the Trenches" school program at his museum.

 

 

 

Hi Bill, I was all set to forget the Scholer then you commented. IF it's a G/D I might pursue it, but was the one you had worth having because you had it made or . . . ? I'm a bit more forgiving, I guess than some, figuring it's a "beginner's instrument."

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I have a Scholer that's actually playable (though it's a lot of work to play) but I've heard lots of stories like Steve's about Scholers that are basically worthless.

 

From your earlier post it sounds like you're looking for a G/D Anglo. If so, would a 20-button be adequate, or do you need 30?

 

Daniel,

Thanks so much for the picture. It definitely looks like what he was trying to describe. It also looks like this is a good instrument to pass. Think I'll go over to another forum to see how to judge a used concertina. I know about bellows & buttons, but obviously there's more to know. I tend to get around a bit where some might be.

LoiS

Scholer concertinas are definitely very nasty things indeed. They are little more than a toy, and a bad one at that. I made the mistake of buying one once very many years ago. It was almost unplayable. Stiff and wheezy, very badly tuned. It lasted a few weeks until one of the brass reeds broke.

 

Another forum? Which one? This one is as good as it gets. Take the time to explore all the options. Here's a couple to get you started.....

http://www.concertina.net/guide.html

http://www.concertin...e_wherebuy.html

 

Hi Steve,

I'm definitely looking for a G/D (but may have to stick with just the C/G I have until I can afford it). It's always nice to have a larger range, which I presume is the reason for 30 buttons. My question has to do with weight. How does a 30 button compare with a 20? I decided to go with concertinas after finding a melodeon a bit heavy. My C/G would be dismissed by many as stiff, but it's getting me started & I'm definitely hooked, just wish the pitch were lower. I know from guitar that a drop D tuning works well for my lower voice.

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30 buttons don't give you more range -- they allow you to play in more keys. 20 button concertinas are designed to play just in their two home keys, though you can sort of fake it in one or two other keys. For a G/D, the cheapest 30-button is a Stagi ($695 from Button Box). If 20 is enough for you, Castiglione sells a decent German-made 20-button G/D for $395. If you go for the Castiglione, make sure you get the double-reeded one -- the single-reed, as of a couple of years ago at least, was pitched higher than a C/G rather than lower.

 

Weight varies more by manufacturer and model than by number of buttons.

 

Daniel

 

I have a Scholer that's actually playable (though it's a lot of work to play) but I've heard lots of stories like Steve's about Scholers that are basically worthless.

 

From your earlier post it sounds like you're looking for a G/D Anglo. If so, would a 20-button be adequate, or do you need 30?

 

Daniel,

Thanks so much for the picture. It definitely looks like what he was trying to describe. It also looks like this is a good instrument to pass. Think I'll go over to another forum to see how to judge a used concertina. I know about bellows & buttons, but obviously there's more to know. I tend to get around a bit where some might be.

LoiS

Scholer concertinas are definitely very nasty things indeed. They are little more than a toy, and a bad one at that. I made the mistake of buying one once very many years ago. It was almost unplayable. Stiff and wheezy, very badly tuned. It lasted a few weeks until one of the brass reeds broke.

 

Another forum? Which one? This one is as good as it gets. Take the time to explore all the options. Here's a couple to get you started.....

http://www.concertina.net/guide.html

http://www.concertin...e_wherebuy.html

 

Hi Steve,

I'm definitely looking for a G/D (but may have to stick with just the C/G I have until I can afford it). It's always nice to have a larger range, which I presume is the reason for 30 buttons. My question has to do with weight. How does a 30 button compare with a 20? I decided to go with concertinas after finding a melodeon a bit heavy. My C/G would be dismissed by many as stiff, but it's getting me started & I'm definitely hooked, just wish the pitch were lower. I know from guitar that a drop D tuning works well for my lower voice.

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Hi Bill, I was all set to forget the Scholer then you commented. IF it's a G/D I might pursue it, but was the one you had worth having because you had it made or . . . ? I'm a bit more forgiving, I guess than some, figuring it's a "beginner's instrument."

 

 

I can see I was a bit unclear. I didn't mean to say that it was custom made for me. The concertina dates to about 1993- around the time the factory was going out of business. I found it in a flea market about 2 years ago, when I was just starting to play (I had just received my Rochelle) I bought it because it was cheap ($45), in like-new condition, had a cool sound because of the octave tuned double reeds, but mostly because it was in G/D. I now have a Morse G/D, which is about 10x easier to play, but still the Scholer was fun to fool around with. Just don't pay too much for it!

Edited by Bill N

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Like Bill I was thinking of a DDR German double reed concertina in GD.

It may help if you add a picture.

 

Is it something like this?

 

Thanks,

Marien

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Like Bill I was thinking of a DDR German double reed concertina in GD.

It may help if you add a picture.

 

Is it something like this?

 

Thanks,

Marien

 

Arggghhh! Whenever I see a picture of something like that calling itself a concertina, my reaction is the same as when I see [...] on the telly. In the latter case I have this strong urge to throw a brick at the screen.

ohmy.gif

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30 buttons don't give you more range -- they allow you to play in more keys. 20 button concertinas are designed to play just in their two home keys, though you can sort of fake it in one or two other keys. For a G/D, the cheapest 30-button is a Stagi ($695 from Button Box). If 20 is enough for you, Castiglione sells a decent German-made 20-button G/D for $395. If you go for the Castiglione, make sure you get the double-reeded one -- the single-reed, as of a couple of years ago at least, was pitched higher than a C/G rather than lower.

 

Weight varies more by manufacturer and model than by number of buttons.

 

Daniel

 

. . .

Hi Steve,

I'm definitely looking for a G/D (but may have to stick with just the C/G I have until I can afford it). It's always nice to have a larger range, which I presume is the reason for 30 buttons. My question has to do with weight. How does a 30 button compare with a 20? I decided to go with concertinas after finding a melodeon a bit heavy. My C/G would be dismissed by many as stiff, but it's getting me started & I'm definitely hooked, just wish the pitch were lower. I know from guitar that a drop D tuning works well for my lower voice.

 

Daniel, I especially thank you for this. Not only for what it says about weight, but the price ranges to plan towards my purchase beyond my present concertina, & especially since I live fairly close to Castiglione.

LoiS

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Like Bill I was thinking of a DDR German double reed concertina in GD.

It may help if you add a picture.

 

Is it something like this?

 

Thanks,

Marien

 

Arggghhh! Whenever I see a picture of something like that calling itself a concertina, my reaction is the same as when I see [...] on the telly. In the latter case I have this strong urge to throw a brick at the screen.

ohmy.gif

 

O.k., Steve, I'm sure you're far beyond my level, but for those of us just starting out, what about the picture says it shouldn't be called a concertina? Hope you see this & have restrained your strong urges.

LoiS<mile!>

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O.k., Steve, I'm sure you're far beyond my level, but for those of us just starting out, what about the picture says it shouldn't be called a concertina? Hope you see this & have restrained your strong urges.

LoiS<mile!>

 

It's not a concertina, but a hexagonal shaped accordion.wink.gif

 

Oi ! Someone's modded my previous post.ohmy.gif The bit in the dots [....] referred to the female ex-Prime Minister of the UK a few years back.

Edited by Steve_freereeder

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OK being serious here for a minute....

 

Yes - we all have to start out somewhere and it is highly likely that we may have to buy a lower-quality concertina to begin with. That's quite understandable. However, there is a trade-off between making progress and having a really poor-quality instrument, which will actually hold you back, because (i) it is physically hard to play, (ii) it sounds awful and (iii) it is likely to go wrong sooner rather than later. I know this - I've been there, many years ago.

 

It is far, far better to just spend a just a little bit extra money and get a decent beginner's instrument, perhaps a Stagi or preferably a Rochelle. You will learn faster, be less frustrated and you will want to keep coming back to the instrument to practise. A Rochelle will actually hold a lot of its value for when the time comes to upgrade.

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