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Marien

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About Marien

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    Heavyweight Boxer

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    the Netherlands

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  1. Thanks Theo, looking forward to receive the wood. I think that considering the age, the mahogany wood stopped working... seems to me that it is very suitable for the job. Easy woodworking and If there is no pressure it will keep its exact form and it won't crack.
  2. Thanks for the tips everyone. Problem with the sycamore is it has to be the right dimensions, quartered and dried for about 12 years (or artificially). So it is not that easy to get it for use today. The original plates with the holes for the pads are 4.2 mm thick and is solid wood, possibly sycamore. When using the birch plywood, would it have to be about the same (4.2 mm)?
  3. I am trying to completely replace a the wood of 2 action plates in an old 30b Lachenal concertina. It looks like a kind of pine. I am wondering - would it be appropriate to use willow (it does not split easily), (good quality) spruce for the basic plate? What would be the best wood to use for it?
  4. Hello Jim, I once tried this tune on a german GD 20b concertina, the name of the tune is exceptionally good but I am not going to say that this counts for the rest. I guess playing the chords fits this double reeded instrument. Marien
  5. Here is how I played the melody of the hebrew song called "O de lo ahavti dai" on a C/G anglo (wheatstone layout). Not every klezmer tune can be played easily on an anglo concertina, but this one suits my anglo. Mostly, when I play klezmer on a concertina, it is on the Crane Duet or de Jeffries Duet concertina. o de lo ahavti dai on wheatstone CG.mp3
  6. Woops, I see, I stole the quote (it was a quote from the jazzy muppet Zoot in the muppet show, saying "forgive me Charly Parker") but I forgot to translate Charly into George...
  7. Another tune is a polish folk song, about falling leaves (after spring and summer have gone). You can find it here: vallende blaadjes. More to come later, Marien
  8. Today I managed to put a tune on soundcloud, at last. I recorded summertime in spring a couple of years ago (in spring). Forgive me Charles Gershwin. I played it on a Lachenal 55b Crane, the guitar part is played by my niece Wendy Lina. Marien
  9. There are colour differences between the ends and the rest of the wood. Inside the fretwork there is no paint, and the oval for the label is not there (so you can't read the label, if there is one inside ;). It makes me think that it is probably a Lachenal with "fresh" new end plates and home made fretwork.
  10. I am hoping that all will be well soon Geoff, Marien
  11. Hi to all, I am puzzled about a 46 MacCann I saw on ebay. Looking at the ends I thought this may be a Lachenal. There are Wheatstone labels on both sides which may be not original. The serial number 2808 is to low for a Wheatstone MacCann isn't it? Also the hooked action is not what I would expect on a Wheatstone. Is this a Lachenal? Thanks, Marien
  12. If I had such a concertina, I would consider to put a lamp between the two ends, illuminating the bellows from within. I'ld use the reeds for repairing a 46 button MacCann that could use a couple of replacement reeds… My advice for learning to play a MacCann Duet would always be to take an instrument with 46+ buttons...
  13. In addition to Dave's remark that concertina's should be stored damp free. I guess that a concertina case should not be made air tight, else it may become wet inside when the temperature decreases. Would it make sense to drill a few holes in a case for air ventilation and to avoid moisture problems. Or would it be enough to put a bit of silica gel inside the case to keep it dry when you are travelling (or in rooms that vary in temperature).
  14. Patrick, As for the ends, no matter if it's veneer or solid woods. I would try to find a "similar" replacement wood for the missing parts. With similar I mean - of a similar age (so it may have the same wrinkles and dryness, it doesn't work anymore) - wood type, grain, structure, pattern - colour/tone of the wood. Sometimes you can find these in an old guitar (beyond repair) or furniture. Sometimes an old antique shop has old veneers... Success, Marien
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