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Found 17 results

  1. Hi, One of the springs on my Anglo broke last night when I was practicing. When I opened it up the spring was broken off in the hole it sits in and I can’t get it out to be replaced with a new one. I’ve tried getting it out with a pointy nose pliers, but there isn’t enough of it showing to grip to pull it out. I have two questions that hopefully someone can help with, it would be very much appreciated. Any ideas on how to get the broken end of the spring out of its hole? Can a new spring be placed beside where the old hole is? Would it be pushed in or is a hole
  2. I and others have written about this process in the past, how older Italian-made concertinas had a clever/cheap system of using rubber linkages to connect the buttons to the lever arms in their concertina mechanism. Over the decades the rubber dries out and cracks and buttons slip down inside the body of the concertina (if you're lucky!) and it's unusable. But broadly speaking most of them can be gotten back up and running by replacing the rubber sleeves. Apparently most folks (including myself back 7yrs or so ago) use silicone tubing that's normally sold to model vehicle enthusiasts for fuel
  3. Hi, This Christmas, a friend’s dad gave me an old Lachenal 30-button Anglo that had been in his family for generations. Unfortunately it is in a pretty sorry state, but as an aspiring musical instrument restorer, I have decided to have a crack at mending it myself (with the help of our friend's tools and DT experience). It is a beautiful instrument, with hardwood ends and bone buttons, steel reeds and a 5-fold bellows. As the photos show, it is a bit dirty (nothing some good cleaning can’t handle) and has had the bellows poorly repaired in the past with what looks like plasters…? Ins
  4. Hey all, I've been working on restoring an old Concertina I picked up at an antique shop, and one of the (many) problems I'm running into is what the button caps are made of, and how they were put together. I attached an image below, does anybody have any knowledge on this, or spares available I could pick up?
  5. What do the pros use to hold (old) bellows open, to leave both hands free for internal repair? (p.s. 'Spouse' is not a useful answer.)
  6. Hi. Sorry if this is a repeat but I couldn't find another similar. One of the brass end bolts holding the right hand side to the bellows has snapped on my anglo 30 key Lachenal. The end is a fraction below the lever of the belows so I cannot get at it with pliers. I have tried superglueing the top of the bolt on and unscrewing it but that does not do the trick. If I could somehow cut a small slot in it I could get a fine screwdriver in and extract it that way. Any ideas?
  7. Hey, I’ve recently acquired an Anglo Wheatstone that sounds like it has done its fair share of travelling and been around for a bit. I’ve been having an absolute blast with it but I am starting to run into an issue. The “posts” (I don’t know if that’s correct terminology) that hold down the spring and lever of the button are starting to work their way loose as I play. Sometime it’s just a little bit of air that leaks but today one spring and lever came completely out of its anchor. Any suggestions? Thanks!
  8. My English Concertina (stagi tenor treble 56 key) lost one of its metal buttons. The lower part broke. Is there any way out there to get a new one? Or is there hope, that the original button can be fixed? I include a picture of the button and a picture of the action I finally managed to open, so you can see, what I need. If everything fails I may use the button of a rarely used note to fill the gap… but of course, I would prefer it to be "really" fixed Any hints? PS: Don't buy this stagi model! Really badly made.
  9. I recently picked up a 38b German bandoneon, cute little thing, on eBay. It needs some work, though the reeds look reasonably good and the action just needs some tweaking, bellows maybe more so. Can anyone recommend anyone (preferably in Europe or North America) who can do bandoneon repair, and who doesn't cost a huge amount for such an inexpensive instrument as I have?
  10. Hello, I'm trying to do some restoration on a small George Jones concertina. It needs alot of work but first up is the non-functioning air button. I think this could be very easy. Here is a picture of the sprung air-button hinge. Perhaps all I need to do is re-glue that leather to the block? Or should I replace that piece of leather hinge altogether? It looks to me like the leather is in still usable shape but kinked from being off for so long. The concertina needs at least 1 pad and has no straps or strap buttons, but I see those readily on eBay. Everything else
  11. Hello Concertina.net concertina gurus. I am the proud owner of a Crane duet, Wheatstone, with a Salvation Army tag. The box itself is rosewood I believe with brown leather bellows, somebody at SA decided it should be their favorite color: um "black"... and has done a rather poor job of refinishing the instrument. Ah but here's the quirk - it only has 35 buttons, but the right side highest accidental key on the top left row, normally Eb, is instead a clearly in tune "A" note. This gives the player a final high A note to complete the A minor scale. I wonder if this was by design/re
  12. This thread is intended for folks like me: total concertina newbies who have recently gotten a Jackie from Concertina Connection. While this box has a good sound and plays easily enough, it does have some durability issues that will manifest themselves after a relatively short time. I've had mine about 2 weeks now, probably putting about 30 hours on it, and already I've had to open it up twice. I suspect that I'm not alone in this, so I'm posting this to give some confidence to those who are afraid to do their own minor repairs. First off, check out this video by Daddy Long Les where h
  13. Hey! I'm new here and a very wet being the ears player, I've been learning anglo for nearly a year now on a secondhand scholer (cue sounds of fainted bodies hitting the floor), but am absolutely in love with this instrument, and harbouring a bit of a silly pipedream about learning to build or at least repair them one day. It seems a bti of a difficult world to get into though, Does anybody have any advice on how I might get into learning short of travelling to Castelfidardo for some years? I live in north wales now and the nearest concertina maker seems to be in Newport. I am trying to learn a
  14. REASON FOR ATTEMPTING 3D PRINTING OF A CONCERTINA Concertinas are too expensive because of complexity and difficulty of manufacture and repair, etc. So I've decided to start 3D printing parts to create a better kind of 'people's' concertina - it's the start of my Concertina Nova project. It's explorative - 'may take years, but the aims are: - use 3D printing to experimentally revise the form of the concertina for better ergonomics and easier playing, yet still good sound - to 'democratize' the concertina by making it available as a cheap, robust instrument at 'guitar prices' - make
  15. Hi, So... I have an important gig tomorrow and my concertina has decided to play up and I'm not sure how to fix it. Normally, I would be able to do these things myself but I can't figure out the problem and my copy of David Elliott's book has conveniently disappeared... The problem is that when you play the G# on the push, and then stop pressing the key, it still sounds quietly until you change the direction of the bellows. My main questions are: 1) What is wrong? 2) Is it fixable by my? 3) How do I fix it?! It would be great if someone could get back to me ASAP! Thank you! Andy
  16. I have been asked to restore a Rock Chidley English Concertina that is in very poor condition. Nothing unusual there, but when I undid the screws on one end the action did not lift off as you would expect it to. So I started gently leavering, and found that the reed pan was coming out with it. On finally extracting the whole I saw the arrangement shown in the attached photo. Somebody had screwed the reed pan to the bottom of the action board. Has anybody ever seen such a thing? Why would anybody do this? Amazing what people do. Perhaps we should start the NSPCC, i.e. the National Soci
  17. The cheap concertinas that I have (old Bastari) are made using plywood. I don't have the idea that using a different wood would have any appreciable change in the sound on them, but does the wood on the better concertinas have any affect on the sound? I seem to remember noticing that the reed plate in one of the pictures seemed to be beech. Does type of wood have as much difference on a concertina as it does in a guitar or a violin? Terrence PS. I just found the thread from 2006 discussing tonewoods. Additional information, though, would be welcome.
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