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#1 Geoff Wooff

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 07:33 AM

Two videos of the new Morse Beaumont have been put up at the Button Box website...

 

Comment;  sounds good and fine playing too!



#2 Wolf Molkentin

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 07:48 AM

Comment;  sounds good and fine playing too!

 

I second that! The videos are quite catching, and the Beaumont delights with that strong squeaky sound that just a good concertina has...!



#3 David Barnert

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 09:00 PM

Keep an eye on them. I'm told that selections will be rotated in and out over time. Both Aaron and I recorded considerably more than it makes sense to display at any one time.



#4 Jim Besser

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 12:36 PM

Keep an eye on them. I'm told that selections will be rotated in and out over time. Both Aaron and I recorded considerably more than it makes sense to display at any one time.

 

What tune are you playing, David?



#5 David Barnert

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 01:42 PM

What tune are you playing, David?

Apley House (from Playford, in the first Barnes book).



#6 Jim Besser

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 02:02 PM

 

What tune are you playing, David?

Apley House (from Playford, in the first Barnes book).

 

 

Nice tune. Your duet chords really lift it from the mundane.



#7 Wolf Molkentin

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 02:32 PM

 

What tune are you playing, David?

Apley House (from Playford, in the first Barnes book).

 

Well, found it in the 12th edition of "The Dancing Master" too. Which source do you rely upon regarding Playford, David? Just aquired a taste for this stuff from TOTM "Parson's Farewell"...

 

Besides, really liked the video...



#8 David Barnert

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 03:19 PM

 

Apley House (from Playford, in the first Barnes book).

 

Well, found it in the 12th edition of "The Dancing Master" too. Which source do you rely upon regarding Playford, David? Just aquired a taste for this stuff from TOTM "Parson's Farewell"...

I'm not a scholar about this stuff. I learned most of the tunes (including this one and Parson's Farewell) by ear while dancing to it in the 1980s. Sure you can go to Playford as the ultimate source, but a good compromise is the Barnes Book(s) that I mentioned. Volume 1 (blue) is at the top of the linked page and has most of the tunes people tend to know. Volume 2 (red, a little further down the page) is more recent, compiled as dance leaders have demanded tunes that aren't in volume 1. Volume 1 became such a standard that musicians at Playford dances were expected to have it, and sheet music would only be provided for tunes that weren't in it. Peter Barnes, the author, joked that he thought of calling volume 2 "Not in Barnes." Now the same is true of both volumes.

Besides, really liked the video...

Thank you.



#9 Wolf Molkentin

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Posted 03 May 2013 - 02:17 AM

Sure you can go to Playford as the ultimate source, but a good compromise is the Barnes Book(s) that I mentioned. Volume 1 (blue) is at the top of the linked page and has most of the tunes people tend to know. Volume 2 (red, a little further down the page) is more recent, compiled as dance leaders have demanded tunes that aren't in volume 1. Volume 1 became such a standard that musicians at Playford dances were expected to have it, and sheet music would only be provided for tunes that weren't in it. Peter Barnes, the author, joked that he thought of calling volume 2 "Not in Barnes." Now the same is true of both volumes.

 

Thank you for the information, guess I'll get at least the first volume...



#10 Wolf Molkentin

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Posted 03 May 2013 - 04:47 AM

Here are the dots for those who might be interested like I am:

 

apleyhousebyuq7.jpg

 

Thank you again, David, for pointing this out to me, thereby providing such a nice entry with your interpretation!

 

Sounds like a prototype of an English country dance to me..., love that!


Edited by blue eyed sailor, 03 May 2013 - 04:55 AM.


#11 David Barnert

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Posted 04 May 2013 - 05:26 AM

 

Sure you can go to Playford as the ultimate source, but a good compromise is the Barnes Book(s) that I mentioned. Volume 1 (blue) is at the top of the linked page and has most of the tunes people tend to know. Volume 2 (red, a little further down the page) is more recent, compiled as dance leaders have demanded tunes that aren't in volume 1. Volume 1 became such a standard that musicians at Playford dances were expected to have it, and sheet music would only be provided for tunes that weren't in it. Peter Barnes, the author, joked that he thought of calling volume 2 "Not in Barnes." Now the same is true of both volumes.

 

Thank you for the information, guess I'll get at least the first volume...

I guess, in a roundabout way, that is what I was suggesting.



#12 David Barnert

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Posted 04 May 2013 - 05:33 AM

Sounds like a prototype of an English country dance to me..., love that!

Above, I was trying to avoid the use of the phrase, "English Country Dance" because the meaning is subtly different in the USA and in England.
 
In the USA, we use it to mean Playford-style dances, whether published by Playford or one of his contemporaries or successors, including modern choreographers. It would certainly include Apley House and Parson's Farewell. In England, it also includes the more rollicking barn dances, cayley dances or what-have-you.

Edited to add:

Peter Barnes is an American, so the title of his book, "English Country Dance Tunes," refers to the former sense.


Edited by David Barnert, 04 May 2013 - 05:37 AM.


#13 Wolf Molkentin

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Posted 06 May 2013 - 01:04 AM

In the USA, we use it to mean Playford-style dances, whether published by Playford or one of his contemporaries or successors, including modern choreographers. It would certainly include Apley House and Parson's Farewell. In England, it also includes the more rollicking barn dances, cayley dances or what-have-you.

 

Thank you again, I'm just exploring new territoriy...!

 

However, my feelings still are as follows: Parson's Farewell sounds more like a universal, European (including England, as I dare to say) Renaissance (and a bit courtly perhaps) dance tune to me (which I nevertheless happen to play with kind of a folky approach), whereas Apley House seems to convey a sense of, well, rural spirit of England...

 

Do you take my point? Might be (certainly is) very personal, maybe from a European/continental  (in the narrow sense of the words, i.e. excluding England) point of "view".

 

Have worked out a version of my own, which I plan to record next...



#14 David Barnert

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Posted 06 May 2013 - 07:17 AM

 

Parson's Farewell sounds more like a universal, European (including England, as I dare to say) Renaissance (and a bit courtly perhaps) dance tune to me (which I nevertheless happen to play with kind of a folky approach), whereas Apley House seems to convey a sense of, well, rural spirit of England...

Playford was neither a composer nor a dancing master, but rather a publisher. Everything he published was other people's work. As I pointed out in the TOTM thread, "Parson's Farewell" is older and more international than Playford. A version of it appears in Praetorius's "Terpsichore" in Germany 11 years before Playford was born.

 

I don't know the provenance of "Apley House." It may well have been written by an English dance musician.



#15 shades

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Posted 09 May 2013 - 04:01 AM

There are three videos up now.

http://www.buttonbox...e-beaumont.html

#16 shades

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Posted 09 May 2013 - 04:18 AM

Here are the dots for those who might be interested like I am:
 
apleyhousebyuq7.jpg
 


This might be a somewhat niche topic but I'm also interested in the dots as a (mediocre) sight singer, especially when I come across something new to me.

I've not seen the key signature done like that before but there again most of what I come across is choral and probably tidied up over the last half century. Having both F sharps makes sense for G but would get horribly messy with increasing numbers of accidentals. I take it that it is an early treble (G) clef and wonder what the extra squiggle is, perhaps an octave lower like the small 8 for tenor scores? The cut time (2/4) is backwards and I have no idea what those moon shapes are top right. Our choir master can probably tell me though!

#17 Wolf Molkentin

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Posted 09 May 2013 - 05:12 AM

 


I've not seen the key signature done like that before but there again most of what I come across is choral and probably tidied up over the last half century. Having both F sharps makes sense for G but would get horribly messy with increasing numbers of accidentals. I take it that it is an early treble (G) clef and wonder what the extra squiggle is, perhaps an octave lower like the small 8 for tenor scores? The cut time (2/4) is backwards and I have no idea what those moon shapes are top right. Our choir master can probably tell me though!

 

Well, I've read the treble clef just like his contemporay compagnons, with the "extra squiggle" being just part ot it (making up kind of a perfect cross on the G line), but of course I may be wrong. Didn't notice that the cut time has been written backwards - but since "alle breve" is symmetric it won't matter even if taken strictly (of course I mean: regarding its basic elements; otherwise it would turn out as off-beat...).

 

The duplication of sharps may just have done in order to facilitate instant reading for not that experienced musicians. Since there will not be that huge amount of sharps or flats regarding tunes like this it won't hopefully get that messy.

 

However, David (as perhaps many others) plays the B-part in Dmaj, albeit the melody doesn't require that necessarily. If it would, there would have to be already four sharps noted for that part, which might turn out as a bit confusing then.

 

OTOH I have worked out a version with avoids any second sharp (i.e. C#) and will record it for further discussion shortly.

 

Regards - Wolf



#18 Wolf Molkentin

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Posted 09 May 2013 - 05:15 AM

And regarding the moon shapes I'd guess they are about people dancing to the music and not playing the dots. Obviously they don't mean men and women since there are only two of each engaged.






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