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Joe G.

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  • Interests
    Playing fiddle tunes, folk and country music on anglo concertina, mandolin, and guitar; writing and publishing; letterpress printing; casting metal type for said printing.
  • Location
    Longview, WA

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  1. Quite right, Theo. It's an expensive lesson, to be sure. I suppose the good news is that it sounds pretty even across the spectrum, and the action is good. Still, the main point of a Jeffries is the tone, and this doesn't have the "bark."
  2. I have a Dipper-restored C/G Jeffries (30 bone button, plus drone, baby cry and bird call) that I bought from another player in 1984. Having never played a Dipper, it has always felt like the perfect blend of vintage and modern to me, but over the years I guess I've come to take that for granted. During the pandemic I temporarily lost my mind and made what I thought was a low bid on a Bb/F Jeffries from a seller online. To abbreviate a long story, the seller accepted my bid. The Bb/F has decent action, if a bit softer than the C/G, but it doesn't sound like a Jeffries because someone along the way has swapped-out most of the Jeffries reeds. It has a pleasant tone but not the authority of a good Jeffries. Happily, it's fun to play, though I'm not especially attached to it. It makes me appreciate my C/G even more.
  3. Great song, Malcolm! Thanks for posting it. David Coffin has a barrel of a voice. And thanks for the follow-up on B. Peat, sadbrewer.
  4. Thanks, sadbrewer. That's the man, for sure. No information about his relationship with the concertina, but still, it's good. Concertina.net is an amazing resource in so many ways.
  5. I have a Jeffries 30-button Bb/F from the 1890s ("C. Jeffries, maker" between the right-hand rows). On the reed pans, written in pencil, I found "B. Peat, 104 Oban Rd, Barking" and "H. Dean 23-4-46." Nothing urgent here, but I'm curious as to whether they serviced the concertina. It has few of its original reeds, though it's otherwise in pretty decent shape. Thanks in advance for any information.
  6. Thank you, Stephen. It's a pretty sweet concertina altogether.
  7. Following the topic of this thread, I have a 39-button Lachenal with metal ends/buttons, parallel reed pans and Jeffries fingering. It's tuned to G/D, but I suspect it was originally in Ab/Eb. It has two numbers stamped inside, and they don't quite agree. On the reed pan it's stamped 199776, but on the inside of the bellows frame it reads 199797. I'd like to know anything about the instrument that this information reveals. Thanks, Joe
  8. David, How much are you asking for the Bb/F Jeffries with the Carroll case? I'm sitting down . . .
  9. Just before the COVID pandemonium I was fitted for a pair of state-of-the-art hearing aids. I could hear my hair scratching on the piece behind my ears, and when I tried playing anything—concertina, mandolin, guitar—the sound was horrible. The audiologist said, "The world is full of sounds you haven't heard for a while." Like my hair scratching on the hearing aids, presumably. The hearing aids connected to my iPhone via an app, and I tried to use that to adjust the sound profile. It was just too frustrating, all around. It wasn't music alone that I found annoying, but that was the greatest disappointment, especially in the age of high fidelity earbuds. The hearing aids cost as much as a good Jeffries anglo, and they gave me no pleasure. I took them back. My hearing will have to be a lot worse before I endure that again.
  10. Try the classified ads on mandolincafe.com.
  11. I'm offering my 30 button Lachenal anglo #152418, with rosewood ends, bone buttons, apparently original six-fold bellows (a bit stained but otherwise in fine shape), refurbished in 2016 by Wim Wakker (mechanically restored, the wood French polished) and played very little since then. Asking $1950, PayPalled and shipped within the U.S., with a contribution made to concertina.net. Includes the case it was in when I first bought it from Lark in the Morning in the early 1980s.
  12. The only pic that came up for me was the ledger page, but I would like to see the rest of them.
  13. In the fall of 1993 I spent an afternoon with Chris Droney, interviewing him for Concertina & Squeezebox Magazine. He and his wife were very generous, and even though I'm sure I asked embarrassingly obvious questions, they both treated me as if I knew what I was doing. I'm afraid it's all been downhill from there.
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