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For Anglo Players Who Read "dots"


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Let me work on my pieces some more and I'll present my rendering of Nordic piece: "Menuet from Cello suites", written by vicious Saxon Johann Sebastian Bach. (Bach? Bachus? Of pagan tradition?)

 

I am very keen to hear you playing it. Will you post it on Youtube? I for myself am practising Krokodil Gena's song at the moment. :)

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I am very keen to hear you playing it. Will you post it on Youtube? I for myself am practising Krokodil Gena's song at the moment. :)

 

You mean this? It's great!!

 

Edit: Oh, I see he seems to sing lots!

Edited by RatFace
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Where is the reference to a Jewish family with the surname of Cohen, in Galway in the 12th. C.? As far as I can tell Coen is not related to the Jewish Cohen.

 

Coyne, Kilcoyne, Kyne, Coen

 

The remarkable extent to which this name and its synonyms appertain to the province of Connacht, and particularly to the counties of Galway and Mayo, is illustrated by the following birth statistics: Form of Total Births Name Registered in [are] Coyne, Kyne, Coen, Kilcoyne. The first three names given above are variant anglicized forms of the Irish O Cadhain, a minor sept originating near Partry, Co. Mayo. Coen (and especially the form Cohen) appears Jewish, but when met in Ireland it is almost always a true Irish name; it may, however, often be an anglicized form of O Comhdhain (also of north Connacht) and not of O Cadhain. There is another synonym of Coyne which is found around Castlebar, ... because the Irish word cadhan means wild goose. Kilcoyne is definitely found in the birth registrations as an alias of Coyne, or [as] an alias of Kilcoyne. Kilcoyne, however, as a rule is not the same name in Irish as Coyne and Kyne, but comes from Mac Giolla Chaoine, I.e. son of a follower of St. Caoin. ... the Quins, one of the assimilated families of Galway City, are in fact Coynes whose name was altered to Quin. The Coens were nearly all in Galway and Roscommon. The name is more closely associated with literary than with political or other activities; apart from the distinguished Jesuit, Father Coyne of our own day, Joseph Sterling Coyne (1803-1868), was a very well known playwright and satirist and was one of the founders of the English Punch; Rev. Joseph Coyne, P.P (1839-1891), was also an author of repute and contributor to the Nation, as was John Coen (b. circa 1820).

 

Ref: http://www.goireland.com/genealogy.htm#discover

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1) Get sheet of paper that will fit in concertina case

2) Jump on said piece of paper wearing golf-shoes

3) Play these dots in dark

 

Handy Tip - If you shine a torch at the paper, you can also make a constellation on the wall.

 

 

See you at Swaledale with your golf-shoes.

 

B)

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Where is the reference to a Jewish family with the surname of Cohen, in Galway in the 12th. C.? As far as I can tell Coen is not related to the Jewish Cohen.

Hmm, right. I have to admit that my source wasn't the internet. Rather, a fellow who was a regular at the Eagle Tavern sessions in New York spent a summer in Ireland researching the historical presence of Jews in Ireland, and that was one of the few definite statements that I remember him making about what he learned.

 

I don't know what his sources were, but he wasn't the sort to have made it up, and that sort of research was something he did regularly, not a one-time lark. A quick google does suggest that if there is evidence to support J's (I wish I could remember his name) statement, it's not common knowledge. So maybe he was wrong?

 

On the other hand, the various internet web sites all say pretty much the same thing. Is that because the Jewish historical presence in Ireland has been well and thoroughly documented, or simply because the numerous "authorities" are in the habit of copying from each other rather than digging into original sources themselves? That latter is unfortunately quite common in pretty much all fields, and especially so on the internet.

 

So I don't know. When J told me that "fact", I believed it, since it came from what I believed to be a trustworthy source. I'm less convinced of the trustworthiness of "historical" information on the internet, but neither do I know (except in a few cases) that they're untrustworthy. For what it's worth, the genealogy web site you directed me to doesn't list my own grandfather's surname, nor any I would recognize as a variant of it, though I have seen it in other lists of Irish family names.

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Was there a serfdom in Ireland?

Many Russian names come from the name of the village, that in turn came from the name of the landlord.

If Jews were allowed to buy land in Ireland, and some of them did, could it be that many people now wear the name, not been genetically connected to any jewishness?

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