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For Anglo Players Who Read "dots"


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If you are an Anglo player who plays strictly by ear, you can stop here. However, if you use sheet music too, the following may be of interest.

 

I have found that I can scan my sheet music (printed or hand written), print on glossy photo paper of 4" x 6" dimensions, and produce "photos" that are highly readable and that nicely fit in a concertina case (fitted or unfitted case).

 

The prints come out surprisingly nice. They can be used outdoors without being blown around by the wind, as much as larger regular-paper sheet music copies. The print is plenty large to read. Most of mine are for Irish tunes that each have two parts with 8 bars per part. But they are also fine for 3 part tunes with 8 bars per part.

 

I keep 6-8 in my concertina case. More than 8, however, could be accomodated. Of course, they fit easily in an unfitted case. But they also fit fine in a fitted case, by standing them on end in the space between the concertina end (next to the hand strap) and the side of the case. They should fit in most cases. For example, they fit fine in the slightly smaller fitted case for a Dipper, County Clare.

 

I scan and print on an Epson copier/scanner/printer. If possible, leave about 1/2 inch margin on each side of the tune in scanning, and do not use the "Fit To Frame" option in printing. The reason for these suggestions is that, in some printers (including mine), a small amount around the edge of the scan may be cut off in printing.

 

I would appreciate feedback, if you try it and like the results (or even if you do not like the results).

Edited by rmerris
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I do feel rather sorry for the English/Duet players who are unable to take advantage of this Anglo-specific advice :P

 

Anyway, I keep a little music notebook in my concertina case - one of these.

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Question from an anglo player: What are dots? Something like Braille?

 

:lol:

 

John

Printed (or on-screen) standard music notation. Also called "tadpoles."

 

Oval-shaped black or hollow dots on or between five horizontal lines of a musical staff, with stems and flags hanging off them.

 

Hope this helps.

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Printed (or on-screen) standard music notation. Also called "tadpoles."

 

Oval-shaped black or hollow dots on or between five horizontal lines of a musical staff, with stems and flags hanging off them.

 

Hope this helps.

 

What will they think of next!?!?!

 

I like the flags - good for patriotic songs :lol:

 

Tadpoles? I thought only violinists needed them - to breed the frogs for their bows ...

 

Thanks, that helped.

 

Cheers,

John

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Question from an anglo player: What are dots? Something like Braille?

 

:lol:

 

John

Yeah, I think I've seen some of them. Apparently, you only get one note per dot though, so it's a bit primitive compared to an anglo. :blink:

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Question from an anglo player: What are dots? Something like Braille?

 

:lol:

 

John

Yeah, I think I've seen some of them. Apparently, you only get one note per dot though, so it's a bit primitive compared to an anglo. :blink:

 

Ya, sure, one dot per note. If it’s sophistication you want, just add chord symbols above (or below) the staff and there you have it... the homophonic glories of western music in one cute little notational package. Regardless, it’s still dots.

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That's a good tip, that size fits nicely in the case and they do read well in good light. make good practice cards. Also sit on your knee when playing without need for a music stand. I printed out keyboard layouts and chord charts for my EC on the same size - very useful.

Edited by Simon H
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Question from an anglo player: What are dots? Something like Braille?

 

:lol:

 

John

Printed (or on-screen) standard music notation. Also called "tadpoles."

 

Oval-shaped black or hollow dots on or between five horizontal lines of a musical staff, with stems and flags hanging off them.

 

Hope this helps.

There's more to this music lark than I first realised. :unsure:

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the homophonic glories of western music ...

 

There's nothing glorious, big or clever about being homophonic. You should listen to sounds from all minority groups equally. What next? Islamophonia?

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Note: you may or may not find this play on words amusing, but it is deliberate and doesn't need correcting, thanks. :0)

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Dots...?

Dots...?

You don't need no steenking dots.

 

Dots lead you astray.

It's like following an outdated map.

After a few times on the same road you'd do better memorizing the route.

Dependence on a crutch diminishes your ability to walk on yr own.

 

The dots, at best, serve as accompaniment to the playing of the tune.

They are a poor replacement for the tune itself.

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Dots lead you astray.

 

But it's only if you are talking about "tunes". Most of western "tunes" don't need any "dots", you are right.

What if you fancy to learn Mozart? There is no way you can memorize Bach's Cello suites from hearing, it's like jazz of the time, the melody just doen't make sense at first, and there is no such thing as "tune" in them, just "themes".

It took me a year to commit Bach's menuet to memory, it takes me already 6 months to learn two pieces from

Cello suites, and I'd rather use crutch and concentrate on expression, than memorize it.

I don't need no dots for my Hohner Club, I don't play nothing sophisticated on it.

But why learn Mozart? Can't we just go to concert and listen to Mozart performed right? The worst case we can pop a CD in.

Well, there is some feeling of talking to a genius through following his logic, expressed musically. It raises the level of conversation, gives you the "inisight" and is rewarding. Makes you an "insider", how's that?

After all, for how long it is bearable to talk about the weather and politics?

Another aspect of playing classical music is therapeutic. It's very complex in phrazing, accents and submerges you completely. You spend an hour working on just fragment of a piece, having forgotten all around you - ideal phycological relaxation!

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But it's only if you are talking about "tunes".

 

Absolutely correct.

 

I was responding to the original poster, who referred to "Irish tunes" when he

talked about stashing little cheat sheets in his concertina case.

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But it's only if you are talking about "tunes".

 

Absolutely correct.

 

I was responding to the original poster, who referred to "Irish tunes" when he

talked about stashing little cheat sheets in his concertina case.

 

Who said I have to read original posts?

Well, I guess it helps, does it not?

In case of Irish tunes "I" would need notation. Irish music is one of the genres where I just can't memorise it, no matter how many times I heard it. It's not so obvious and predictable, as compared to Scottish or English, if to stay within Anglo-Saxon circle.

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Irish music is one of the genres where I just can't memorise it, no matter how many times I heard it. It's not so obvious and predictable, as compared to Scottish or English, if to stay within Anglo-Saxon circle.

 

Irish and Scottish are now Anglo Saxon? Are you going to tell them or am I?

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Irish music is one of the genres where I just can't memorise it, no matter how many times I heard it. It's not so obvious and predictable, as compared to Scottish or English, if to stay within Anglo-Saxon circle.

 

Irish and Scottish are now Anglo Saxon? Are you going to tell them or am I?

 

 

Look, don't catch me on this.

Oh boy!

All right, I picked up a shield and unless the info is absolutely flawed here comes:

Scotland:

population is about 5 million people, Scotish Gaelic spoken by 58 thousand people.(what?)

Ireland:

Population in both parts 6 million people, Irish Gaelic spoken by 350 thousand.(wow! My applauds)

Wells is populated by 2.9 millions and Welsh is spoken by 750 thousand.(see? that's a proud Nation for you)

So...

If Scotts and Irish are so not Anglo-Saxon, let them learn English as a Second Language.

As long as Scottish or Irish don't know Gaelic from Garlick, their ethnic identity is on par with cardboard box. I just wanted to express myself simpler, without bringing some very obscure for 99% of this forum participants genres, like Klezmer, French, Mongolian, you name it.

This forum is just soooo British. You expect everybody in the World to understand your petty claims? God bless you.

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