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Rochelle Anglo


Mikefule
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I have found a reliable local source for a Rochelle Anglo. However, he will have to order it in specially, so I won't get an opportunity to try two or three and choose the best. As I have never played one (other than a quick doodle on a borrowed one) I would only be able to test it for airtightness and for none of the notes sticking anyway.

 

Looks like it will have to be C/G, £210. I will be playing for the Morris (but solo, not with other instruments) and sometimes in the "wall of sound" pub session with melodeons.

 

Earlier posts in this forum have led me to believe that the way that you play a C/G is somewhat different from the way you play a G/D. On the C/G, the emphasis is more towards melody on the right and accompaniment on the left. If I start on one tuning and need to change later, I will have some relearning to do to play in common keys. Is that broadly right?

 

I also get the impression that if I am ever sufficiently wealthy to upgrade to a genuine vintage one, it is more likely to be a C/G. Is that right too?

 

Advice would be welcome. I am close to having psyched myself up to place an order, but don't want to get it wrong.

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Looks like it will have to be C/G, £210. I will be playing for the Morris (but solo, not with other instruments) and sometimes in the "wall of sound" pub session with melodeons.

 

Earlier posts in this forum have led me to believe that the way that you play a C/G is somewhat different from the way you play a G/D. On the C/G, the emphasis is more

 

G/D is generally better for Morris if you're playing with others, since we're all locked into G by those stubborn melodeon players. The G/D will give you more chord options when playing in G, with a more traditional Morris sound, than you'd get playing a C/G cross row.

 

But if you're playing solo, it doesn't matter; just transpose to C, which means you can play tunes in the same style on your C/G. On the Rochelle, that's probably better, since you'll be more audible at the higher registers.

 

I did that for years, playing solo for a Morris side, mostly in C. I'd shift to G when others joined in.

 

If you get a G/D later on (I know G/D is not an option with a Rochelle), you'll be set; play the tunes the same way you used to, and presto, you're in G.

Edited by Jim Besser
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Earlier posts in this forum have led me to believe that the way that you play a C/G is somewhat different from the way you play a G/D. On the C/G, the emphasis is more towards melody on the right and accompaniment on the left. If I start on one tuning and need to change later, I will have some relearning to do to play in common keys. Is that broadly right?

I think it is truer to describe the G/D as melody on the right and accompaniment on the left (the so-called English style), while playing in G and D on a C/G tends to spread the melody over both hands. Jim is right about playing in G tunes in C and D tunes in G on the C/G when playing solo - there's no problem changing between the two systems then.

I also get the impression that if I am ever sufficiently wealthy to upgrade to a genuine vintage one, it is more likely to be a C/G. Is that right too?

Depends. There are more C/Gs around but more people want to buy them. I have never had problems buying G/Ds when I wanted them and of course all the new makers include G/Ds in their ranges.

 

Chris

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have just received a Rochelle C/G to review, courtesy of the good people at the Music Room. I have only had time to play for 10 mins this weekend, but they are mechanically sound, airtightness is good and it seems a bargain for the price. I have had a go with Stagis and the like so know what to look for as regards "breakability" and the Rochelle is by far a better-built instrument.

I will post a longer review when I have played it at some gigs and taken it around various concertina clubs and let players of various traditions give their views on it (I play morris and Irish and found no problems there)

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Thanks. I have in fact now ordered a C/G Rochelle and hope to receive it within a few days.

 

Mike

 

But why didn't you order it from The Concertina Connections directly?

What's more reliable source for Rochelle, than producers themselves?

 

I can think of two reasons off the top of my head:

a ) support your local music shop - use it or lose it

b ) if there is a problem you take it back to the shop, and they are the ones with the headaches of international shipping, long distance phone calls etc (depending on Mikefule's location).

Samantha

Edited by Samantha
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Thanks. I have in fact now ordered a C/G Rochelle and hope to receive it within a few days.

 

Mike

 

But why didn't you order it from The Concertina Connections directly?

What's more reliable source for Rochelle, than producers themselves?

 

I can think of two reasons off the top of my head:

a ) support your local music shop - use it or lose it

b ) if there is a problem you take it back to the shop, and they are the ones with the headaches of international shipping, long distance phone calls etc (depending on Mikefule's location).

Samantha

 

I can add to that;

 

c) You can try it out in the shop.

 

If I am buying a musical instrument, I much prefer to try it out first. A Rochelle may be cheap by Anglo standards, but £210 is not exactly small change and you are more likely to be happy with your purchase if you have "had a go" first

 

Geoff

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If the shop does the service or or has good exchange/return policy - sure.

Trying out something, that you have no alternative to, is not particularly useful. It's just an illusion, we have no real choice.

My comments were the result of very interesting experience with Lark in the Morning folks:

 

-Is this concertina in good tune?

-Oh yes, it's in very good condition.

-But it's not sounding on the push and the bellows have two large holes.

-Really? Hmm.

-Do you do the service?

-Um, well, not really.

-How much is this Wheatstone?

-Let's see, oh yea, here's the tag. $2500. Are you going to buy today?

-Do you have return policy?

-Not on these instruments, sir...

 

But at least he was not putting these concertinas in his mouth, as the other guy was doing with harmonicas. To my startling look he said "Don't worry, I'm very healthy". (his shtick was playing them with his nose, btw)

 

But it's fine compared to yet another guy.

As I was checking the instruments, some black guy came in, the one who does mechanic dance on the street. He was drooling and he was trying all the whistles on the shelves.

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Well, the concertina's arrived at the shop. My friend says he's impressed with the quality for the price, although it had been assembled with one pair of reeds in swapped positions, which he's put right. He played it over the phone to me and will be delivering it tomorrow.

 

Sounds like the forum made a good recommendation.

Edited by Mikefule
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