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banjojohn

Concertina Maker Or Distributer... W Coleman & Co

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Has anybody ever come across a concertina with this name on it ???

If so can they please provide any info?

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Stephen, thanks for this clue, but the answer is that I simply don't know. It seems that Albert W Coleman was an author of an instruction manual for German Concertina, and the particular instrument that bears this name is of the English system.... Do you have any knowledge of A W Coleman making/distributing concertinas bearing the name?

Edited by banjojohn

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Stephen, thanks for this clue, but the answer is that I simply don't know. It seems that Albert W Coleman was an author of an instruction manual for German Concertina, and the particular instrument that bears this name is of the English system....

 

And the publisher of that tutor is given as W. Colemam, 5, Sykes Terrace, Mile End Road, if that fits in with anything... Perhaps the same person, and maybe a concertina teacher/dealer?

 

 

Do you have any knowledge of A W Coleman making/distributing concertinas bearing the name?

 

No, but give me something solid to go on, like a photo, an address, a date or whatever and I might find something out. What have you got?

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... the publisher of that tutor is given as W. Colemam, 5, Sykes Terrace, Mile End Road, if that fits in with anything...

 

And he's still there in the 1864 Musical Directory, Register & Almanac that I have, listed under "Musical Instrument Makers - Miscellaneous" (though that doesn't necessarily mean he actually made anything at all, as you might have gathered by now).

 

In the same Directory, under "Professors - London" there is also an entry for R. Coleman (organ) also at 5, Sykes Terrace, and A. W. Coleman (organ Trinity Church, Tredegar Square, Stepney) 211, Whitechapel Road.

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On the 1841 Census, William Coleman, "Shoe maker" (age 35) is living at Brunswick Street, Hackney, with wife Maria (the only time she's listed, age 33), sons Albert (10), Charles (7) & Arthur (3).

 

Whilst in 1851 he's at 15, Grove Lane, St. John's Hackney, "Musical Instrument Maker" (born Hackney, age 45), with his sons Albert W., "Organist" (born Stoke Newington, age 19); Charles A., "Musician" (born Stoke Newington, age 17); Arthur, "Scholar" (born Hackney, age 13); and Robert, "Scholar" (born Hackney, age 7). (Their immediate neighbours there being shoe makers, his old trade... )

 

In 1861 William Coleman, "Music Seller" (born Hackney, age 55) is living at 5, Sykes Terrace with his son Robert, "Music Seller" (born Hackney, age 17).

 

In 1861 Albert W. Coleman, "Music Seller" (born Stoke Newington, age 29) is married and already living at 211, Whitechapel Road, St Mary Whitechapel.

Edited by Stephen Chambers

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The label in the cartouche says 'Improved Concertina W. Coleman & Co 5 Sykes Terrace Mile End Road....

 

Stephen, thanks for this, it seems you have answered my question!

Edited by banjojohn

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Stephen, thanks for this, it seems you have answered my question!

 

Not to my satisfaction I haven't! :unsure:

 

I evidently identified the right William Coleman, but the big question for me is who made this concertina, and when?

 

I'm very curious to see some photos of it... :huh:

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The label in the cartouche says 'Improved Concertina W. Coleman & Co 5 Sykes Terrace Mile End Road....

 

Come to think about it, that "Improved Concertina" wording is usually to be found in association with Nickolds, I wonder...

 

(The reeds and lever pivots should answer that question!)

Edited by Stephen Chambers

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Ok, I've finally got around to pulling this one apart and taking some photographs:

post-11975-0-43558600-1450348651_thumb.jpgpost-11975-0-70106600-1450348681_thumb.jpgpost-11975-0-38794200-1450348703_thumb.jpgpost-11975-0-43436000-1450348729_thumb.jpgpost-11975-0-05546000-1450348754_thumb.jpg

 

Seem to have reached the limit for photo data here, will put the others on a further reply...

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W. Coleman concertina photos continued:

post-11975-0-17032600-1450349082_thumb.jpgpost-11975-0-61998500-1450349105_thumb.jpgpost-11975-0-26881200-1450349133_thumb.jpgpost-11975-0-49605700-1450349157_thumb.jpg

 

So, some interesting deviations from 'unimproved' concertinas...

 

Any thoughts from members as to the maker, the age etc, would be much appreciated...

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What you have is a French made English concertina.

On the inside of the left reed pan it has G 5 which stands for Gauche (left) and on the inside of the right reed pan it will have a D for Droite (right)

Edited by mike byrne

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Any thoughts from members as to the maker, the age etc, would be much appreciated...

 

Well, it looks to me like the "maker's" label is pasted over another label. That would be a literal rebadging.

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Thanks for your replies, Mike, Jim and Stephen! I guess that Mr Coleman was simply importing them from France, putting his label on them and selling them on as 'English' English Concertians!

Edited by banjojohn

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So, were there many French-made English concertinas? Do we know much about French manufacturers? I've never seen levers mounted this way before; was it unique to French-made concertinas, or to a particular brand of French-made concertinas?

 

Is this too many questions? Topic drift?

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Mike, I have been thinking along the same lines myself... Similar questions have been popping up in my mind, hoping that some members might have answers... ?

There doesn't appear to any maker's marks on this particular instrument, but the number 47, if it is a serial number is low, suggesting that this was an early one... But by who and where?

Edited by banjojohn

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It is highly likely that these instruments were made as a by-product of certain Paris harmonium makers and possibly commissioned by dealers in England. The same action, as in the Coleman example, can also be seen in some Ebblewhite labelled instruments of the same period. It is obvious that John Henry Ebblewhite (1826-1901) visited France for he married his second wife, Amy Louisa Price, in Paris in 1866.

Considering that both concerns of Ebblewhite and Coleman operated within relatively close proximity, Aldgate & Mile End respectively, it could be supposed that some cooperation took place between the two in importing these instruments.

 

I have attached, information gathered from various sources regarding:

 

a. The Coleman family during the 1806 – 1927 period which expands on what has been said so far.

 

Coleman Family 1806 - 1927.doc

 

b. Those of the Ebblewhite family concerned with the musical instrument trade in the Aldgate area (1806 – 1966).

 

Ebblewhite Aldgate 1806-1966.doc

 

Although none of this pinpoints an actual maker, it may be of interest.

 

Happy New Year to one and all.

 

Geoffrey

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