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English Concertina


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In another Topic (Buy and Sell Forum) discussion arose concerning ranges and keyboard layouts of various instruments in the 'English' concertina family.

 

To perhaps enlighten or confuse further, I have attached some information for consideration.

 

No information regarding Piccolo or Bass instruments has been included as both were made in a variety of ranges, number of keys etc. The inclusion of some, at this time, may not be useful. Maybe those that possess such instruments could post details of range etc. so that a more complete source of information can be collected and included in the document.

 

English Explanations.doc

 

Please read it carefully before shooting me down. It might make up for my lack of contributions and if I start a topic, at least I can't be blamed for killing it.

 

 

Geoff

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Geoff,

As usual a clear and comprehensive explanation brilliantly executed. Thank you, thank you, thank you!

 

Greg

 

(I'd like to take just a paragraph or two to render deserved praise: In the seven years that I have participated in this forum Geoff Crabb has been not only a definitive source of concertina information and history but has been very considerate in taking the time to skillfully share his knowledge in the form of computer word files and accompanying graphics. A number of his print outs have become my primer for understanding concertina range and layout; reed chamber construction; reed shoe stamping; and fretwork repair and replacement.

 

This largess of sharing is particularly amazing in light of the fact that Geoff is presently an active concertina maker as well, carrying on a family tradition that spans 150 years. Concertina making, as some of us know, is a most demanding mistress of time. That Geoff has taken the time and applied his usual meticulousness to share his expertise in these concertina mini-treatises is a true gift to us all! Thanks again, Geoff)

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This is great, Geoff.

Thanks very much.

In consequence of that discussion in the Buy & Sell Forum I I made some drawings of the various possible layouts. I know how time consuming that is.

 

Reading carefully I was surprised by the 48B Baritone (non-transposed) on page 4: it has 25 buttons on the LH side, and 23 on the RH side. For an equal spreading of the buttons/reeds I'd expect a high G# on the RH side instead of the Ab on the left.

The same for the D# and Eb on the non-transposed Baritone-Tenor.

 

Leonard

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Geoff,

As usual a clear and comprehensive explanation brilliantly executed. Thank you, thank you, thank you!

 

Greg

 

 

Thanks Greg, I try.

 

Unfortunately my making is very limited, one or two instruments hand-made each year now.

 

 

 

Reading carefully I was surprised by the 48B Baritone (non-transposed) on page 4: it has 25 buttons on the LH side, and 23 on the RH side. For an equal spreading of the buttons/reeds I'd expect a high G# on the RH side instead of the Ab on the left.

The same for the D# and Eb on the non-transposed Baritone-Tenor.

 

Leonard

 

Thanks Leonard, yes it is time consuming and usually I finish with dots in front of the eyes.

 

It is almost impossible to think to include everything when attempting at provide this amount of information. Only input or queries, like yours, can help to expand the content.

 

The two arrangements you mentioned are based on Crabb plans and it was often a customer requirement for a wind key to be fitted. As the preference was for this to be fitted to the right-hand side, the Ab for G# and Eb for D# allowed room for the provision of a wind pad hole etc. whilst maintaining the minimum instrument physical size.

 

I now noticed an unmarked button (E) on the standard 56 Bari-Ten. Wonder where that went, seems to be on the original.

 

thank you mr Crabb,I now know that the 'Mayfair' is a"treble"concertina,though i don't know what freq. range this covers(used to A=440Hz).I think it might be a bit high for me.

Will own one soon..I hope

 

The range should be G3 (196Hz) - C6 (1046Hz) @ A440. Standard reduced Treble.

 

Enjoy the instrument when you get it.

 

 

Geoff

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Mr. Crabb some while back also posted a great diagram showing some standard ranges relative to a piano keyboard, with Middle C clearly marked. If it is amenable, I may link both of these from the static pages about concertina types here on C.net.

 

Here's the thread with Geoff's diagram linked from post #14 in the thread.

 

Ken

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  • 9 years later...

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