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Different Learning Process For Musicians?


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#1 Teriodin

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 05:38 PM

I got my Anglo 30 today and, just out of habit, picked up a tutorial book. I read the start carefully about where the notes were, how to hold it, what the straps were for, etc., then found the same sort of 'Recorder for beginners' tunes I remember from 45 years ago at school *chuckles*

 

I'm guessing other musicians skip all these starting tunes too.

 

Ran up and down the scales for 10 minutes, then played some tunes I know by ear. I'm currently only using the C row while I get to grips with the bellows action on tunes like Irish Washerwoman.

 

Is that a sensible way forward, or is it viable to just skip to the 30 button section?  (Easy Anglo 1 2 3 book)

 

(I already play Clarinet, Flute, Guitar, EWI, etc.)



#2 Jack Campin

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Posted 11 February 2017 - 10:56 AM

I have a couple of very good tutor books (for other instruments) where what looks a bunch of absolutely trivial stuff on the first few pages turns out to be nothing of the sort when you actually try to play it. So maybe don't skip too fast?



#3 Doug Barr

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Posted 11 February 2017 - 02:01 PM

Might not want to get to use to going up and down the "C" row for tunes, especially if you are into Irish trad.  most modern players go across the rows.  I'm sure as you delve  more deeply into the concertina you will find your own style  What type of music are you interested in and what tutor books do you have?

Doug



#4 Teriodin

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Posted 12 February 2017 - 07:21 AM

I'm interested mainly in Scottish and Irish melody/jig/reel/air tunes, rather than 'oom-pah-pah' style music. Would be happy to learn Morris tunes from England if they're fun to play (Monck's March, for instance)

 

Don't aim to perform on stage any more, but it's fun to sit and play 'around the campfire' with other musicians.  :D

 

I have the "Easy Anglo 1-2-3" book at the moment, which starts you out on the C row, then advances to playing across the C and G rows, before finally adding the accidentals.

 

I have a good sheet music collection, so finding tunes to play has not been a problem so far.

 

(On a side note: while 'Twinkle Twinkle' may be a nice tune for a recorder, 'Drunken Sailor' feels like it was actually written on a concertina. Maybe the tutors should start with that one? *chuckles* )


Edited by Teriodin, 12 February 2017 - 08:51 AM.


#5 MJGray

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Posted 12 February 2017 - 08:43 AM

I've gotten a ton of mileage out of Gary Coover's books, and I like the structure of "1-2-3" a lot. That being said, I certainly didn't learn all of the 1- and 2-row tunes before moving on to 3-row ones, and have now largely abandoned that book in favor of his "Harmonic Style", which focuses on playing both melody and accompaniment at the same time, (what I like best about the anglo). The books are tools. I dare say that however you use them to accomplish your goals is fine.

 

(My experience with music tutorial books - guitar, banjo, now concertina - has been that I get the most use out of the first half or so, which teach the fundamental techniques. It's a very rare tutorial where I've actually worked through it cover to cover. My goal is more to learn the most useful basics so that I can then spend my own time playing around with them.)

 

Have fun!

 

Mike



#6 Anglo-Irishman

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Posted 12 February 2017 - 03:46 PM

(My experience with music tutorial books - guitar, banjo, now concertina - has been that I get the most use out of the first half or so, which teach the fundamental techniques. It's a very rare tutorial where I've actually worked through it cover to cover. My goal is more to learn the most useful basics so that I can then spend my own time playing around with them.)

 

Mike,

Your aside makes a good point!

 

There are (at least) two types of musician. One type wants to play the music that's "out there" in song-books, tune-books and classical scores. The second type wants to play the music that's "in there," i.e. in their heads, accumulated from years of listening to music and humming it to themselves from earliest childhood on.

 

Seeing as you dispense with the tutors after they've given you the fundamental techniques, I'd guess you're one of the second type. So am I. As soon as the tutor thinks I'm ready to play little tunes, I shelve it, and start playing little tunes out of my head (or by ear, as some say).

 

A great advantage of being one of the second type is that when an original tune occurs to you, you can transfer your composition from your head to your instrument of choice directly, without having to work out how you'd notate it!

 

Cheers,

John



#7 Rod

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Posted 13 February 2017 - 12:03 AM

Yes. For those of us who only wish to play the Anglo solo, creatively, entirely for our own satisfaction and amusement, and have the ability to work it all out for ourselves...musical theory, dots-on-paper and printed tutors are entirely superfluous. That has been my experience !

#8 Teriodin

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Posted 14 February 2017 - 06:31 AM

I'm having fun with it. Started playing across the rows last night, picking tunes mainly in G and D from my sheet music books and just playing them by sight-reading and working out the fingering as I go.

 

It's always fun when I find one I know without realising I knew it, not recognising it by name. You know, when you start playing the melody notes and then your brain goes "Oh - it's THAT one!"  :D

 

I'm actually finding that the 'Concertina Notation' in the book is off-putting and slows me down, so I transcribed the tunes into EasyABC and use that as my sheet music.

 

Very addictive instrument - everyone else in the house must be sick of the sound of it by now  :P





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