Jump to content

Wheatstone Aeola Maccann 72 Button Duet Concertina.


kobastal7953
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi guys.No offers yet. I'll leave it on the C/Net for about another week,before putting it on Ebay. I'm open to close offers.A very well known dealer recently payed £1700 for one in similar condition. (Mentioning no names).As I said before,it is in great condition. I've enclosed some interior pictures. Good luck,Norman.My Email is: nb_uk@hotmail.com.My phone no: is 0161 205 3810.(Manchester,UK).

post-1293-1252080069_thumb.jpg

post-1293-1252080113_thumb.jpg

post-1293-1252080145_thumb.jpg

post-1293-1252080190_thumb.jpg

post-1293-1252091237_thumb.jpg

post-1293-1252521930_thumb.jpg

post-1293-1252521950_thumb.jpg

post-1293-1253647350_thumb.jpg

post-1293-1253824521_thumb.jpg

Edited by kobastal7953
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi I'll get in touch direct. I live in Sheffield

 

 

Can anyone advise on these.

 

I have a smaller Maccann which I find limiting. At Whitby I was in a session where Iris Bishop played a bigger one and I was pretty inspired I looked at one on a stall at the craft fair which had 55 buttons. What is best for someone who wants to play in the mainly trad keys but put chords in and with a decent range. I don't think I'll ever get too many keys and chords on my Anglo as I've gone down the ITM route buta have along the rows as my natural default having grown up with mouthorgan and one row melodeon (although John Kirkpatrick's chord workshop was also inspiring)

 

Cheers

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can anyone advise on these.

 

I have a smaller Maccann which I find limiting. At Whitby I was in a session where Iris Bishop played a bigger one and I was pretty inspired I looked at one on a stall at the craft fair which had 55 buttons. What is best for someone who wants to play in the mainly trad keys but put chords in and with a decent range. I don't think I'll ever get too many keys and chords on my Anglo as I've gone down the ITM route buta have along the rows as my natural default having grown up with mouthorgan and one row melodeon (although John Kirkpatrick's chord workshop was also inspiring)

 

Cheers

Mike

 

Hi Mike

 

I saw that 55 button at Whitby on Chris Algar's stand ... but it 's lowest button on the right hand was a G. Before I bought my 61k in May I received advice from someone who's been playing for 35 years that I should consider a 57 or 61 key, which went down to middle C on the right hand, and had an octave crossover. It was suggested to me that I personally did not really need a 71 key - but I'm sure that Dirge, who plays a 71 , would disagree!! I believe Iris has actually got two Maccanns at least ... but cannot for the life of me remember what sizes they were. I suspect someone more knowledgeable will be along in a minute ;) It's not really clear from that question whether you're asking for advice about Maccanns, or about all other types of concertina, in view of your asking about "playing in the mainly trad keys" - since a Maccann is chromatic. Quick ... where are the REALLY knowledgeable people on here??? (I speak with all of the gravitas of someone who's been playing for 18 months...)

Edited by Irene S
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can anyone advise on these.

 

I have a smaller Maccann which I find limiting. At Whitby I was in a session where Iris Bishop played a bigger one and I was pretty inspired I looked at one on a stall at the craft fair which had 55 buttons. What is best for someone who wants to play in the mainly trad keys but put chords in and with a decent range. I don't think I'll ever get too many keys and chords on my Anglo as I've gone down the ITM route buta have along the rows as my natural default having grown up with mouthorgan and one row melodeon (although John Kirkpatrick's chord workshop was also inspiring)

 

Cheers

Mike

 

Hi Mike

 

I saw that 55 button at Whitby on Chris Algar's stand ... but it 's lowest button on the right hand was a G. Before I bought my 61k in May I received advice from someone who's been playing for 35 years that I should consider a 57 or 61 key, which went down to middle C on the right hand, and had an octave crossover. It was suggested to me that I personally did not really need a 71 key - but I'm sure that Dirge, who plays a 71 , would disagree!! I believe Iris has actually got two Maccanns at least ... but cannot for the life of me remember what sizes they were. I suspect someone more knowledgeable will be along in a minute ;) It's not really clear from that question whether you're asking for advice about Maccanns, or about all other types of concertina, in view of your asking about "playing in the mainly trad keys" - since a Maccann is chromatic. Quick ... where are the REALLY knowledgeable people on here??? (I speak with all of the gravitas of someone who's been playing for 18 months...)

 

 

 

Thanks Irene

 

I suppose I was asking 'what's the best number of buttons for what I want to do which is mainly trad?'.

 

Cheers

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can anyone advise on these.

 

I have a smaller Maccann which I find limiting. At Whitby I was in a session where Iris Bishop played a bigger one and I was pretty inspired I looked at one on a stall at the craft fair which had 55 buttons. What is best for someone who wants to play in the mainly trad keys but put chords in and with a decent range. I don't think I'll ever get too many keys and chords on my Anglo as I've gone down the ITM route buta have along the rows as my natural default having grown up with mouthorgan and one row melodeon (although John Kirkpatrick's chord workshop was also inspiring)

 

Cheers

Mike

 

Hi Mike

 

I saw that 55 button at Whitby on Chris Algar's stand ... but it 's lowest button on the right hand was a G. Before I bought my 61k in May I received advice from someone who's been playing for 35 years that I should consider a 57 or 61 key, which went down to middle C on the right hand, and had an octave crossover. It was suggested to me that I personally did not really need a 71 key - but I'm sure that Dirge, who plays a 71 , would disagree!! I believe Iris has actually got two Maccanns at least ... but cannot for the life of me remember what sizes they were. I suspect someone more knowledgeable will be along in a minute ;) It's not really clear from that question whether you're asking for advice about Maccanns, or about all other types of concertina, in view of your asking about "playing in the mainly trad keys" - since a Maccann is chromatic. Quick ... where are the REALLY knowledgeable people on here??? (I speak with all of the gravitas of someone who's been playing for 18 months...)

 

 

 

Thanks Irene

 

I suppose I was asking 'what's the best number of buttons for what I want to do which is mainly trad?'.

 

Cheers

Mike

 

Hi Mike.

I'm the bloke about whom Irene was talking!

I started on a 48 Macann. Quickly found it too limiting, so moved up to a 56.

Have played nothing else for 30 years. As Irene says, though, it's vital that it goes down to C on the right, and that you have that octave repeated on both sides...

These are slightly rarer. (a lot only go down to G on the right, which means you get loads of dog scaring notes at the very top end, which, quite frankly you'll never use! And why pay money for notes that you're not going to play)

 

Have dabbled with boxes in the 60's and 70 key sizes,(and bigger!) but the disadvantage is the reaction time of the reeds particularly if you want to get some speed up.

I play both for song accompaniment, and in several English Dance bands. so, I need the versatility of the 56 key box.

 

It'll suit you down to the ground for folk song and tune stuff....

 

As for the really big buggers....a) They're much heavier and B) You press a button and wait 5 minutes for a note to appear!!

 

The 56 has served me well for a long time, and I'm still discovering new avenues with it.

 

FYI, My home keys are.

Majors

C,G,D,A,E

F,Bb,Eb, and a little bit of Ab if the winds in the right direction!

Minors

Am,Em,Bm, F sharp m,Dm,Cm.

 

That seems to cover most tunes! and I can normally adapt to any singer that I'm playing with.

Hope the above helps...But, you'll have hours of fun with a 56 Key!!!

Good luck

Ralph

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can anyone advise on these.

 

I have a smaller Maccann which I find limiting. At Whitby I was in a session where Iris Bishop played a bigger one and I was pretty inspired I looked at one on a stall at the craft fair which had 55 buttons. What is best for someone who wants to play in the mainly trad keys but put chords in and with a decent range. I don't think I'll ever get too many keys and chords on my Anglo as I've gone down the ITM route buta have along the rows as my natural default having grown up with mouthorgan and one row melodeon (although John Kirkpatrick's chord workshop was also inspiring)

 

Cheers

Mike

 

Hi Mike

 

I saw that 55 button at Whitby on Chris Algar's stand ... but it 's lowest button on the right hand was a G. Before I bought my 61k in May I received advice from someone who's been playing for 35 years that I should consider a 57 or 61 key, which went down to middle C on the right hand, and had an octave crossover. It was suggested to me that I personally did not really need a 71 key - but I'm sure that Dirge, who plays a 71 , would disagree!! I believe Iris has actually got two Maccanns at least ... but cannot for the life of me remember what sizes they were. I suspect someone more knowledgeable will be along in a minute ;) It's not really clear from that question whether you're asking for advice about Maccanns, or about all other types of concertina, in view of your asking about "playing in the mainly trad keys" - since a Maccann is chromatic. Quick ... where are the REALLY knowledgeable people on here??? (I speak with all of the gravitas of someone who's been playing for 18 months...)

 

 

 

Thanks Irene

 

I suppose I was asking 'what's the best number of buttons for what I want to do which is mainly trad?'.

 

Cheers

Mike

 

Hi Mike.

I'm the bloke about whom Irene was talking!

I started on a 48 Macann. Quickly found it too limiting, so moved up to a 56.

Have played nothing else for 30 years. As Irene says, though, it's vital that it goes down to C on the right, and that you have that octave repeated on both sides...

These are slightly rarer. (a lot only go down to G on the right, which means you get loads of dog scaring notes at the very top end, which, quite frankly you'll never use! And why pay money for notes that you're not going to play)

 

Have dabbled with boxes in the 60's and 70 key sizes,(and bigger!) but the disadvantage is the reaction time of the reeds particularly if you want to get some speed up.

I play both for song accompaniment, and in several English Dance bands. so, I need the versatility of the 56 key box.

 

It'll suit you down to the ground for folk song and tune stuff....

 

As for the really big buggers....a) They're much heavier and B) You press a button and wait 5 minutes for a note to appear!!

 

The 56 has served me well for a long time, and I'm still discovering new avenues with it.

 

FYI, My home keys are.

Majors

C,G,D,A,E

F,Bb,Eb, and a little bit of Ab if the winds in the right direction!

Minors

Am,Em,Bm, F sharp m,Dm,Cm.

 

That seems to cover most tunes! and I can normally adapt to any singer that I'm playing with.

Hope the above helps...But, you'll have hours of fun with a 56 Key!!!

Good luck

Ralph

Hi Ralph.I own the 72 key Wheatstone Maccann,& I can assure you that if the response was as slow as you say,I certainly wouldn't have bought it. If anything,the response is faster than the smaller & cheaper models.Cheers,Norman.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can anyone advise on these.

 

I have a smaller Maccann which I find limiting. At Whitby I was in a session where Iris Bishop played a bigger one and I was pretty inspired I looked at one on a stall at the craft fair which had 55 buttons. What is best for someone who wants to play in the mainly trad keys but put chords in and with a decent range. I don't think I'll ever get too many keys and chords on my Anglo as I've gone down the ITM route buta have along the rows as my natural default having grown up with mouthorgan and one row melodeon (although John Kirkpatrick's chord workshop was also inspiring)

 

Cheers

Mike

 

Hi Mike

 

I saw that 55 button at Whitby on Chris Algar's stand ... but it 's lowest button on the right hand was a G. Before I bought my 61k in May I received advice from someone who's been playing for 35 years that I should consider a 57 or 61 key, which went down to middle C on the right hand, and had an octave crossover. It was suggested to me that I personally did not really need a 71 key - but I'm sure that Dirge, who plays a 71 , would disagree!! I believe Iris has actually got two Maccanns at least ... but cannot for the life of me remember what sizes they were. I suspect someone more knowledgeable will be along in a minute ;) It's not really clear from that question whether you're asking for advice about Maccanns, or about all other types of concertina, in view of your asking about "playing in the mainly trad keys" - since a Maccann is chromatic. Quick ... where are the REALLY knowledgeable people on here??? (I speak with all of the gravitas of someone who's been playing for 18 months...)

 

 

 

Thanks Irene

 

I suppose I was asking 'what's the best number of buttons for what I want to do which is mainly trad?'.

 

Cheers

Mike

 

Hi Mike.

I'm the bloke about whom Irene was talking!

I started on a 48 Macann. Quickly found it too limiting, so moved up to a 56.

Have played nothing else for 30 years. As Irene says, though, it's vital that it goes down to C on the right, and that you have that octave repeated on both sides...

These are slightly rarer. (a lot only go down to G on the right, which means you get loads of dog scaring notes at the very top end, which, quite frankly you'll never use! And why pay money for notes that you're not going to play)

 

Have dabbled with boxes in the 60's and 70 key sizes,(and bigger!) but the disadvantage is the reaction time of the reeds particularly if you want to get some speed up.

I play both for song accompaniment, and in several English Dance bands. so, I need the versatility of the 56 key box.

 

It'll suit you down to the ground for folk song and tune stuff....

 

As for the really big buggers....a) They're much heavier and B) You press a button and wait 5 minutes for a note to appear!!

 

The 56 has served me well for a long time, and I'm still discovering new avenues with it.

 

FYI, My home keys are.

Majors

C,G,D,A,E

F,Bb,Eb, and a little bit of Ab if the winds in the right direction!

Minors

Am,Em,Bm, F sharp m,Dm,Cm.

 

That seems to cover most tunes! and I can normally adapt to any singer that I'm playing with.

Hope the above helps...But, you'll have hours of fun with a 56 Key!!!

Good luck

Ralph

Hi Ralph.I own the 72 key Wheatstone Maccann,& I can assure you that if the response was as slow as you say,I certainly wouldn't have bought it. If anything,the response is faster than the smaller & cheaper models.Cheers,Norman.

 

Hi Norman. Apologies. No offense meant. But I'm sure you've seen some fairly ropey boxes in your time!!

I'm sure your box is well set up, It's just that for me, a 72 key would be a waste. I doubt that I would ever explore it's outer reaches with the style that I play in!

Maybe to see it sometime.

Cheers Ralph

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can anyone advise on these.

 

I have a smaller Maccann which I find limiting. At Whitby I was in a session where Iris Bishop played a bigger one and I was pretty inspired I looked at one on a stall at the craft fair which had 55 buttons. What is best for someone who wants to play in the mainly trad keys but put chords in and with a decent range. I don't think I'll ever get too many keys and chords on my Anglo as I've gone down the ITM route buta have along the rows as my natural default having grown up with mouthorgan and one row melodeon (although John Kirkpatrick's chord workshop was also inspiring)

 

Cheers

Mike

 

Hi Mike

 

I saw that 55 button at Whitby on Chris Algar's stand ... but it 's lowest button on the right hand was a G. Before I bought my 61k in May I received advice from someone who's been playing for 35 years that I should consider a 57 or 61 key, which went down to middle C on the right hand, and had an octave crossover. It was suggested to me that I personally did not really need a 71 key - but I'm sure that Dirge, who plays a 71 , would disagree!! I believe Iris has actually got two Maccanns at least ... but cannot for the life of me remember what sizes they were. I suspect someone more knowledgeable will be along in a minute ;) It's not really clear from that question whether you're asking for advice about Maccanns, or about all other types of concertina, in view of your asking about "playing in the mainly trad keys" - since a Maccann is chromatic. Quick ... where are the REALLY knowledgeable people on here??? (I speak with all of the gravitas of someone who's been playing for 18 months...)

 

 

 

Thanks Irene

 

I suppose I was asking 'what's the best number of buttons for what I want to do which is mainly trad?'.

 

Cheers

Mike

 

Hi Mike.

I'm the bloke about whom Irene was talking!

I started on a 48 Macann. Quickly found it too limiting, so moved up to a 56.

Have played nothing else for 30 years. As Irene says, though, it's vital that it goes down to C on the right, and that you have that octave repeated on both sides...

These are slightly rarer. (a lot only go down to G on the right, which means you get loads of dog scaring notes at the very top end, which, quite frankly you'll never use! And why pay money for notes that you're not going to play)

 

Have dabbled with boxes in the 60's and 70 key sizes,(and bigger!) but the disadvantage is the reaction time of the reeds particularly if you want to get some speed up.

I play both for song accompaniment, and in several English Dance bands. so, I need the versatility of the 56 key box.

 

It'll suit you down to the ground for folk song and tune stuff....

 

As for the really big buggers....a) They're much heavier and B) You press a button and wait 5 minutes for a note to appear!!

 

The 56 has served me well for a long time, and I'm still discovering new avenues with it.

 

FYI, My home keys are.

Majors

C,G,D,A,E

F,Bb,Eb, and a little bit of Ab if the winds in the right direction!

Minors

Am,Em,Bm, F sharp m,Dm,Cm.

 

That seems to cover most tunes! and I can normally adapt to any singer that I'm playing with.

Hope the above helps...But, you'll have hours of fun with a 56 Key!!!

Good luck

Ralph

Hi Ralph.I own the 72 key Wheatstone Maccann,& I can assure you that if the response was as slow as you say,I certainly wouldn't have bought it. If anything,the response is faster than the smaller & cheaper models.Cheers,Norman.

 

Hi Norman. Apologies. No offense meant. But I'm sure you've seen some fairly ropey boxes in your time!!

I'm sure your box is well set up, It's just that for me, a 72 key would be a waste. I doubt that I would ever explore it's outer reaches with the style that I play in!

Maybe to see it sometime.

Cheers Ralph

 

Hi,

 

I don't usually post, but I would like some clarification here from anyone else who plays a MacCann duet, as I am seriously looking to start playing one myself.

 

I have looked up the fingering charts laid out very nicely in Rutterford, Ernest.

A Practical and Comprehensive Tutor for the Duet Concertina

 

The first fingering chart that goes down to Low C is shown as 58 key instrument, which would make Ralph's instrument either modified, or custom built. Incidently I'd love to know more about your concertina Ralph, like which make, it's size etc. Pics would be great!

 

I understand from speaking to other players the importance of having this extended range and overlap, but was wanting to be sure as to wether I should be looking for a 56 or 58 key instrument, wether 56 key instruments tuned down to low c on the right hand are common or not. I know it's only a 2 key difference, but I want to be looking for the right thing.

 

I want the smallest instrument possible that will be suitable for folk and classical music.

 

Any feedback would be much appreciated.

 

-Joe-B^)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi,

 

I don't usually post, but I would like some clarification here from anyone else who plays a MacCann duet, as I am seriously looking to start playing one myself.

 

I have looked up the fingering charts laid out very nicely in Rutterford, Ernest.

A Practical and Comprehensive Tutor for the Duet Concertina

 

The first fingering chart that goes down to Low C is shown as 58 key instrument, which would make Ralph's instrument either modified, or custom built. Incidently I'd love to know more about your concertina Ralph, like which make, it's size etc. Pics would be great!

 

I understand from speaking to other players the importance of having this extended range and overlap, but was wanting to be sure as to wether I should be looking for a 56 or 58 key instrument, wether 56 key instruments tuned down to low c on the right hand are common or not. I know it's only a 2 key difference, but I want to be looking for the right thing.

 

I want the smallest instrument possible that will be suitable for folk and classical music.

 

Any feedback would be much appreciated.

 

-Joe-B^)

 

Joe

 

Ralph is currently sans PC and will be for a few days. Although I am a newbie in these areas, there are a couple of things I can add.

 

Firstly, be aware that Rutterford has actually included the air button in his count of the number of keys - thus the 56 button diagram actually has 55 sounding keys and an air button, and the 58 is actually a 57 key plus air button, depending on which way you care to designate the number of keys !

 

Secondly, I actually have photo's of Ralph's Aeola which were taken as a precaution for insurance and identification purposes. I was a bit bemused by his statement that he plays and has played a 56 for years, as I had always understood the machine in quesiton to be a 57 key. I think he must have hit the wrong keys on the PC keyboard, as I have just counted the number of buttons in the photographs of both sides of the machine in question, and it is indeed a 57k (or 58 if you are Rutterford) ... so I would assume very unlikely to be a special build.

 

I think you will find he has already answered your question with his opinion about the smallest instrument suitable for folk music, which is his principle area. But no doubt he can answer that one so much better when he is back in the land of the computer connected. If he wants to put pics up, no doubt he will.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes 58s are fine for general tune with improvised accompaniment stuff. It's a nice size too; you don't have to pump like a looney as you do with the 46's but they aren't so huge that you have to fight it.

 

Your problem may be the classical if you are serious about that; once you start reading keyboard music you are forever wanting more bass range. I started with a 61 and went to a 71. I can do a lot with the 71 but have now bought an 81 and expect that to open up a lot more piano music to me.

 

A 58 came and went; it was a really nice instrument but I really couldn't justify keeping it.

 

If classical is an ambition you could do a lot worse than this one being offered here; it's priced to sell.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Hi,

 

I don't usually post, but I would like some clarification here from anyone else who plays a MacCann duet, as I am seriously looking to start playing one myself.

 

I have looked up the fingering charts laid out very nicely in Rutterford, Ernest.

A Practical and Comprehensive Tutor for the Duet Concertina

 

The first fingering chart that goes down to Low C is shown as 58 key instrument, which would make Ralph's instrument either modified, or custom built. Incidently I'd love to know more about your concertina Ralph, like which make, it's size etc. Pics would be great!

 

I understand from speaking to other players the importance of having this extended range and overlap, but was wanting to be sure as to wether I should be looking for a 56 or 58 key instrument, wether 56 key instruments tuned down to low c on the right hand are common or not. I know it's only a 2 key difference, but I want to be looking for the right thing.

 

I want the smallest instrument possible that will be suitable for folk and classical music.

 

Any feedback would be much appreciated.

 

-Joe-B^)

 

Hi Joe. Back on line now (via a friends laptop!)

Yes Irene is right as usual! I just always included the air button! Never realised there was some sort of convention!

I have two Duets. Both Wheatstones and metal ended. One 6-sided and one Aeola.

Apart from he shape they are pretty much identical, (although the Hexagonal one is louder If thats possible!).

That one is on loan to Irene at the moment, but I think it's about 29000 ish..puts it early 1920s at a guess. No doubt someone will put me right!!

I actually have the original receipt for the aeola. Interesting read...

 

Buyer Mr F Rolls

Date purchased 1st October 1924 (Coming up to its birthday then!)

Number 30271

 

Price (plus case) 26 Pounds 10 Shillings

Tax 10% 2 Pounds 13 Shillings

Cash Discount !! 1 Pound 13 Shillings

 

Total 27 Pounds 10 Shillings.

 

Oh for those prices to be still current today!

 

As for pics..Irene has some. I think, of both boxes. Until I hopefully get my hard drive back I won't know if I've still got them, (or indeed anything else!). So, over to you Irene...Happy for you to stick them up on here.

And in my Profile pics on Facebook there are few pics of me playing the aeola at variou gigs.

Good luck with you quest, you are making a wise choice!

As for size...I'm just looking at a pic of Tommy Williams. For a thin old bloke he seems to handling an 80 something box whith comparative ease!! Must eat more spinach.

 

Ralphie

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good to see that Ralph is back online and can answer for himself :)

Yes Irene is right as usual!

I don't necessarily claim that role ... just a tendency to check things out if they puzzle or intrigue ;)

I actually have the original receipt for the aeola. Interesting read...

 

Buyer Mr F Rolls

Date purchased 1st October 1924 (Coming up to its birthday then!)

Number 30271

 

Price (plus case) 26 Pounds 10 Shillings

Tax 10% 2 Pounds 13 Shillings

Cash Discount !! 1 Pound 13 Shillings

 

Total 27 Pounds 10 Shillings.

 

Oh for those prices to be still current today!

On the quest for knowledge again, I just checked that out on a historical currency converter ... and depending on which measure you use ... in this case per capita inflation rate (ie relating price to average earning power) the modern day equivalent would have been around £5200. (Interestingly enough the sort of current cost that Colin Dipper mentioned to me for manufacture of a modern equivalent a month or two ago).

As for pics..Irene has some. I think, of both boxes. Until I hopefully get my hard drive back I won't know if I've still got them, (or indeed anything else!). So, over to you Irene...Happy for you to stick them up on here.

Will do,boss! I will seek out and post ... I can also post up a couple of you playing said same Aeola for the delectation of those who don't have Facebook connections (if they're sensible) :rolleyes: (If I can work out how to attach a picture, that is!

Must eat more spinach.

I've got a load of the frozen variety in the fridge if you need it?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ralphie said "No doubt someone will put me right?" ... since I suspect that was aimed at me (?) , and I can't resist a challenge .....

 

The six sided concertina which Ralph refers to is number 31479 - according to the Wheatstone ledgers manufacture date May 10th 1927, and a 58 key.

(He said it was louder than the Aeola ... I can definitely agree it certainly IS loud! Good job my neighbour's on holiday at the moment.)

Checking the ledgers it seems the Aeola (also registered as a 58 key) has had it's birthday already, as the date given is September 1st - so it presumably spent it's time languishing in a shop somewhere until it reached the grand old age of exactly a month. (Had to go researching again, didn't I!! :rolleyes:

 

At the moment I can't track the pic I wanted down ... so here's one of Ralphie's six sider and his Aeola together in the sunshine! One of the Aeola enjoying the Stowmarket sunshine in 2007, and one of Ralphie playing the Aeola at the ECMW in June. (Please note that all photos are my copyright, should the issue ever arise :) )

 

Hope that suits your requirements Ralphie?

 

post-6811-1253270628_thumb.jpg

 

post-6811-1253271043_thumb.jpg

 

post-6811-1253275430_thumb.jpg

Edited by Irene S
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's my 71 and an example of what you can do with a larger duet. Only 138 numbers earlier than this one, but probably a little softer than it because of having lots of dural instead of brass. One take and warts and all but it gives an idea of what you can do; this is a bit of Schumann well known to all piano learners. Couldn't do it on less than a 71, I don't think.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's my 71 and an example of what you can do with a larger duet. Only 138 numbers earlier than this one, but probably a little softer than it because of having lots of dural instead of brass. One take and warts and all but it gives an idea of what you can do; this is a bit of Schumann well known to all piano learners. Couldn't do it on less than a 71, I don't think.

 

Hi Mr Dirge...!

Just had a listen to the Schumann bit...Remember it from my youth!!

Jolly nice too. Yes, it would be very tricky on a 58. But thats the wonderful versatility of the beast, isn't it?

My style of playing is much more idiosyncratic. Am in the middle of doing a couple of tracks for the "Duet International" CD set due out next year.

I'm very much a "By Ear" man. One of the first pieces I attempted was 3/6 ths of Peter Warlocks Capriol Suite...Learnt from my brothers EP!! (Not a dot in sight!).

Obviously it's not grammatically correct (in the music sense!). But it can still raise the hairs on the back of my neck when I get it right!! (not very often!!)

 

Hope to hear more of your playing sometime!!

Regards Ralphie

 

PS. Thanks Irene for putting up the pics..... Will need a CD Rom of them sometime. Hard Drive totally knackered..Lost everything! x

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So what is the ideal number of buttons on a Crane duet?

Hi Paul.

Well the only player I know is Tim Laycock. He has at least two, and one is about the same size as mine, the other slightly bigger. Have to say, you don't see many Crane players around on the Folk Scene in the UK. Same with Jeffries Duets.

Bigger Cranes must exist I suppose, but I can't recall ever having seen one.

Maybe a chat with Chris Algar might help. He's registered here.

Good Luck with your quest

Ralphie

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...