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Tradman

Mark Gilston on YouTube

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Hello folks, I've finally posted some performances on YouTube. One of me playing English concertina, and one of me playing dulcimer. The intent is to start posting regularly (about once a week) for those who might want to subscribe. The concertina is an old Wheatstone baritone, and I'm playing a couple of old Swedish polskas to kick things off.

 

 

Hope you enjoy!

 

Mark Gilston

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.......

Hope you enjoy!

 

Mark Gilston

Hi Mark

 

I did. My favorites are the ones posted from members here. I'm looking forward to more.

 

Thanks

Leo

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I've posted a second concertina video to YouTube

 

 

Enjoy,

 

Mark Gilston

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Nice stuff. Also enjoyed your contribution to the 'English International' compilation.

 

I think the Swedish folk repertoire is very well suited to the sound of the concertina. It often sounds more haunting/contemplative than the usual Anglo-American/Irish stuff, maybe because it's not all in the key of D/G. Danny Chapman, a.k.a. Ratface, also has some recordings from Ben - son of Tom - Paley's anthology of Swedish pieces on his website. (See there was also a thread on the subject back in 2005.)

Edited by LangoLee

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This week I've uploaded a Macedonian dance played on English concertina. Paidushkata (the limping dance) was popular in folk dance circles back in the 1980's. The rhythm is 5/16 (quick-slow).

 

 

Hope you enjoy,

Mark Gilston

http://markgilston.com/

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This week I've uploaded a Macedonian dance played on English concertina. Paidushkata (the limping dance) was popular in folk dance circles back in the 1980's. The rhythm is 5/16 (quick-slow).

Hi, Mark,
5/16?

What's that in metric?
:D
B)

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Back to Swedish music this week with a lovely Waltz-Skänklåt after Erik Nillson. A Skänklåt is a traditional tune for gift giving... usually at weddings. I play it on my baritone English concertina (of course).

 

 

Mark Gilston

Edited by Tradman

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Back to Swedish music this week with a lovely Waltz-Skänklåt after Erik Nillson. A Skänklåt is a traditional tune for gift giving... usually at weddings. I play it on my baritone English concertina (of course).

 

 

Mark Gilston

Hmm. A printed version perhaps? As a gesture to promote Swedish music among endless Russian steppes?

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Back to Swedish music this week with a lovely Waltz-Skänklåt after Erik Nillson. A Skänklåt is a traditional tune for gift giving... usually at weddings. I play it on my baritone English concertina (of course).

 

 

Mark Gilston

Hmm. A printed version perhaps? As a gesture to promote Swedish music among endless Russian steppes?

 

That would mean I'd have to figure out what notes I'm playing! :-) But in all seriousness, I play everything by ear.

Edited by Tradman

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This week I took a break from Swedish tunes and posted the old Irish march, Return to Fingal.

 

 

Enjoy,

Mark Gilston

http://markgilston.com/

 

 

well done Mark.. maybe try to play more staccato when you, do the Irish stuff; see how it works. What do the more experienced 'Irish' players think about my suggestion?

 

Dirk, Belgium

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I am loving this and it is setting a benchmark for my own playing. Alas! I am a long way off yet.

 

Ian

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This week I took a break from Swedish tunes and posted the old Irish march, Return to Fingal.

 

 

Enjoy,

Mark Gilston

http://markgilston.com/

 

 

well done Mark.. maybe try to play more staccato when you, do the Irish stuff; see how it works. What do the more experienced 'Irish' players think about my suggestion?

 

Dirk, Belgium

 

 

I guess I treat this piece more as an air than as a march. I generally do play a lot more staccato when I do Irish jigs, reels and hornpipes, but I also use much less harmony. I'll probably post some of those at some future date.

 

Mark

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Back to Swedish music this week with a lovely Waltz-Skänklåt after Erik Nillson. A Skänklåt is a traditional tune for gift giving... usually at weddings. I play it on my baritone English concertina (of course).

 

 

Mark Gilston

Hmm. A printed version perhaps? As a gesture to promote Swedish music among endless Russian steppes?

 

That would mean I'd have to figure out what notes I'm playing! :-) But in all seriousness, I play everything by ear.

You mean you are a "By-Ear" player of English system, whose playing sounds like he's working with a score? I just can't cope with this. I refuse!

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Back to Swedish music this week with a lovely Waltz-Skänklåt after Erik Nillson. A Skänklåt is a traditional tune for gift giving... usually at weddings. I play it on my baritone English concertina (of course).

 

 

Mark Gilston

Hmm. A printed version perhaps? As a gesture to promote Swedish music among endless Russian steppes?

 

That would mean I'd have to figure out what notes I'm playing! :-) But in all seriousness, I play everything by ear.

You mean you are a "By-Ear" player of English system, whose playing sounds like he's working with a score? I just can't cope with this. I refuse!

 

I taught myself English concertina in the early 1970's after hearing John Roberts accompanying a particularly poignant song in a marvelous concert with Tony Barrand. For many years I only used it as song and ballad accompaniment with the occasional harmonized British or Balkan dance tune, but in the late '80's I started working out Swedish "spelsman" arrangements after falling in love with the genre.

 

Mostly I'm doing lots of parallel thirds and parallel sixths cadencing on an open fifth with accompanying drones and a moving bass line. I've also worked out a bunch of interesting ornament techniques.

 

I can read music on it if sorely pressed, but it's quite laborious for me. Basically my technique is to hear what I'm reading in my head, and then play what I hear on the concertina. If you ask me to play a particular named note or chord, I have to figure out what the notes are and then play them. Much easier to just play what I want to hear.

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