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W. Jeffries Maker


reg
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Oh, two of you. Okay. Well then, thanks to both of you. I forgot who was posting at Mudcat. The thread disappeared so quickly. Folks sure do like to post there.

 

I'll get my hand crank out from the trunk of the Model A and crank up the ol' digital. If it'll take a charge, I'll take a few cheesecake images of this sweet thing. Then I'll see if I can figure out how to upload them here. Any suggestions as to what the folks here might wish to view? I can cut the bellows part open easy enough with my musical saw, if they really have to see inside there. (Just kidding around!) I saw some photos posted here already and I have some idea of what everyone might wish to see.

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Hmmm, after reading another post here, I should add some further description by way of dimensions. Each side of this measures about 3 1/2 inches. From flat side to the opposite flat side it measures 6 1/4 inches and from point to opposite point it measures 7 1/4 inches. There are seven folds in the bellows and when closed they measure about 6 inches acrss.

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So, does a Duet have a distinct difference from an Anglo? A local repair person says that it has more deep bass notes. But, given that I'm unfamiliar with just how many deep notes an average concertina might have, I'm stumped by how the determination might be made regarding the difference between and Anglo and a Duet.

 

an anglo has different notes on the push and pull of each button, whereas on a duet, you have the same note when you push and pull. that is the best way to be to tell the difference.

 

the layout of the notes is also very different (there are many types of duets), as well as the spacing of the buttons, etc.

 

duets are designed to be able to play independent melody and accompaniment, whereas anglo is designed to be able to play melody easily, with simple chordal accompaniment.

 

btw, an english concertina also has the same note on push and pull. the layout is different than a duet, however, and is similar to the anglo in that it can play melody with simple, chordal accompaniment. the easiest way to tell an english (which you dont have) is that it has thumb straps rather than hand straps.

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Oh, two of you. Okay. Well then, thanks to both of you. I forgot who was posting at Mudcat. The thread disappeared so quickly. Folks sure do like to post there.

 

I'll get my hand crank out from the trunk of the Model A and crank up the ol' digital. If it'll take a charge, I'll take a few cheesecake images of this sweet thing. Then I'll see if I can figure out how to upload them here. Any suggestions as to what the folks here might wish to view? I can cut the bellows part open easy enough with my musical saw, if they really have to see inside there. (Just kidding around!) I saw some photos posted here already and I have some idea of what everyone might wish to see.

 

Reg,

 

Don't saw your bellows apart. If you are dying to see the reeds on the other side of the concertina, there should be a simpler solution - the reed pan, where all the reeds slot in, should slide out from the end of the concertina if you hook a finger or two through the large hole in the center of the pan and pull. Depending on age and condition of the instrument, this may or may not be easy because it's designed to be a snug fit and wood can warp. If it seems like it requires excess force, I'd let an expert do it. On most concertinas like this, it shouldn't be too hard.

 

-David

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... an english (which you dont have) ...

I'll reserve judgement on that 'til I see photos, but I was told (by a very well-known US Anglo player) that his repair guy had been shown a W. Jeffries English concertina, and I was asked if it was rare - to which the reply would have to be the (Irish) proverbial "as rare as hens' teeth!" :blink:

 

Whilst I've seen Englishes with rusty reeds that did play different notes on press and draw... :unsure:

 

Let's see some photos!

pics.gif this_thread_is_useless_without_pics.gif pics.gif

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DSCF0009.jpg

 

Here's the right side.

OK, so I guess the well-known US Angloist was told wrong by the repairer (it's gotta be the same instrument I was asked about, W. Jeffries concertinas are incredibly rare), or jumped to the wrong conclusion based on a description. It appears to be either an Anglo with a full 4 rows (which in itself would be extremely rare) or (maybe?) a Jeffries duet, or something strange?.

 

Reg, it's potentially quite valuable, it deserves to be professionally looked at/repaired.

Edited by Stephen Chambers
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DSCF0009.jpg

 

Here's the right side.

OK, so I guess the well-known US Angloist was told wrong by the repairer (it's gotta be the same instrument I was asked about, W. Jeffries concertinas are incredibly rare), or jumped to the wrong conclusion based on a description. It appears to be either an Anglo with a full 4 rows (which in itself would be extremely rare) or (maybe?) a Jeffries duet, or something strange?.

 

Reg, it's potentially quite valuable, it deserves to be professionally looked at/repaired.

 

DSCF0009-1.jpg

 

Okay, here's the other side, the LH side. It's just like the other side, except no extra button to add air to the bellows.

 

Being an innocent, I still have too little understanding about the exact differences between a Duet and an Anglo but as you've said, this could be something unique, perhaps something experimental, maybe even a one off idea that never caught on. Back in the day, I imagine, that since the making of such instruments was in its infancy, there may have been some noodling with the design concepts, since no one was demanding that everything should be standardized. Perhaps it's a customized piece, made special for just one player that wanted it done in this fashion.

 

DSCF0008.jpg

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DSCF0009-2.jpg

 

Here's a larger view of the left side. I'm still struggling with all of the hoops to post these.

 

Seems to me your struggles have been most worthwhile. An interesting beast indeed. You're lucky to have it. I also had a leather case just like yours, when I got my Jeffries (C not W). It had unfortunately dried to the extent that it no longer offered protection to the instrument. However I was able to find a saddler prepared to make an exact copy, which I still have. I hope you keep hold of your concertina, have it refurbished, and then set about playing it!

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Being an innocent, I still have too little understanding about the exact differences between a Duet and an Anglo ...

The simple difference is that an Anglo plays different notes on press and draw (opening and closing the bellows), whilst a Jeffries duet (which is based on the Anglo) plays the same notes on press and draw - but rust on reeds can make them play different notes, and be very misleading. Jeffries duets and Anglos can look exactly the same, and instruments are sometimes converted from one to the other.

 

However, the appearance of your concertina wouldn't be typical of either, though the only other W. Jeffries I've ever seen was an Anglo with 6 buttons on each row, but in a more normal 3 rows:

 

WJeffries36-key.jpg

 

... but as you've said, this could be something unique, perhaps something experimental, maybe even a one off idea that never caught on. Back in the day, I imagine, that since the making of such instruments was in its infancy, there may have been some noodling with the design concepts, since no one was demanding that everything should be standardized. Perhaps it's a customized piece, made special for just one player that wanted it done in this fashion.

That is still a possibility, as one-offs were made for people, though designs had become pretty-much standardised by the time this was made, which was when concertina-making was at it's peak (not in its infancy).

 

edited to add photo

Edited by Stephen Chambers
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Oh, okay, so this is an Anglo. Because the notes being played while opening and closing the bellows are definitely different and it's not because of any rust contamination. As I mentioned, this instrument is about as rust free as one could ever hope to find something of this age.

 

So, have you any idea how old this might be? You've said that it was made when concertina making was at its peak. When was that? All indications that I've found so far lead me to believe that it was sometime in the early 1900s, given the Nelson Liners ad that I found on the piece of news paper that was wrapped around the twine in the handle of the case. That fleet was later sold off to another company. Though I suppose that the case could have been picked up anywhere along the way and added.

 

There seems to be only one repair person that I was told about, locally. His name is Mike. I got his info from one of the clerks at a Seattle area shop. I gave him a call and he said that he'd like to have a look at this when I'm in his neighborhood.

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...............

There seems to be only one repair person that I was told about, locally. His name is Mike. I got his info from one of the clerks at a Seattle area shop. I gave him a call and he said that he'd like to have a look at this when I'm in his neighborhood.

Hi Reg

 

This is a good repair guy. Close to Spokane:

http://www.concertinaconnection.com/contact.htm

 

His main web page is under construction, but most of the menu works on the bottom. I'd use his services for repair over someone local and unknown. There are others that are good too, but this one is the closest.

 

Thanks

Leo

Edited by Leo
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....

So, have you any idea how old this might be? You've said that it was made when concertina making was at its peak. When was that? All indications that I've found so far lead me to believe that it was sometime in the early 1900s, given the Nelson Liners ad that I found on the piece of news paper that was wrapped around the twine in the handle of the case. That fleet was later sold off to another company. Though I suppose that the case could have been picked up anywhere along the way and added.

 

Hi Reg,

A very interesting article on the Jeffrie's dynasty can be found at http://www.concertina.com/jeffries/man-and-family/index.htm

W Jeffries (son of the famous concertina maker C Jeffries) moved to 38 Craven Park in 1906, but I am not sure when the 'W Jeffries, 38 Craven Park London NW' started to appear on his concertinas. My (very) limited understanding is that after the death of C Jeffries (1906), the family then started to produce Jeffrie Brothers concertinas before going their own ways in the 1920's. So I guess that might date a W Jeffries in the 1920's.

This is just my guess .... I am sure some more knowledgeable on this forum (like Stephen Chambers) could verify that or correct that.

Dave

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So, have you any idea how old this might be?

I'd suggest it was probably made in the early 1920s (around the same time his brother Charles was working in Kilburn), but he seems to have produced very few instruments, and possibly with some co-operation from Wheatstone's, or members of their staff. William seems to have been primarily the reed maker in the family.

 

This is a previous thread you can check-out about him: William Jeffries, Information on William Jeffries

 

You've said that it was made when concertina making was at its peak. When was that?

Roughly, between 1890 to 1930.

 

All indications that I've found so far lead me to believe that it was sometime in the early 1900s, given the Nelson Liners ad that I found on the piece of news paper that was wrapped around the twine in the handle of the case. That fleet was later sold off to another company. Though I suppose that the case could have been picked up anywhere along the way and added.

It looks like a C. Jeffries case, and earlier than the instrument.

 

There seems to be only one repair person that I was told about, locally. His name is Mike. I got his info from one of the clerks at a Seattle area shop. I gave him a call and he said that he'd like to have a look at this when I'm in his neighborhood.

That confirms to me that this is indeed the same concertina I was asked about previously - but either the repairer, and/or the player who asked about it (who lives in the vicinity of Seattle), must have been confused by a description of an unusual instrument they hadn't seen.

Edited by Stephen Chambers
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Stephen, yes, when I last spoke to Mike, he had an inaccurate description of what I had. Perhaps due to my inability to offer him the proper details he needed. Just as those here thought that pictures of this would be needed to better determine or confirm what it was that I had, he wanted to be able to see it in order to understand it better.

 

So, here's my next question. As a rare concertina, what kind of value might this hold? I've seen Charles' instruments offered for sale. Is this something that would be considered as valuable? Or would it perhaps be more so given it's rare nature? Any thoughts?

 

many thanks, reg

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