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Crabb 38 key G/D on eBay


Dave Rogers
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Looks like a nice one:

 

It is. But the opportunity to buy a new Dipper came along, and how could I turn down an opportunity like that? I was sorry to see it go, but I couldn't afford to keep both. I hope Chris gets a good price for it.

 

Geoff Crabb told me it was made in October 1924.

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Interesting comment by Chris on ebay about conversion to G/D was that introduced by the D/G melodeon phenomenon oin the 50s onwards for morris and trad music?

 

He says he knows of very few originally tuned D/Gs

 

Who did the original conversions and from which keys?

Edited by michael sam wild
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Much the same with 'C/G' Jeffries

 

I'll hazard a wild guess that perhaps a third of such instruments today, when closely inspected, were originally Bb/F

 

(I can hear the rustle of screwdrivers whipping off endplates from here :lol: )

 

Dave

 

 

Interesting comment by Chris on ebay about conversion to G/D was that introduced by the D/G melodeon phenomenon oin the 50s onwards for morris and trad music?

 

He says he knows of very few originally tuned D/Gs

 

Who did the original conversions and from which keys?

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  • 2 weeks later...
I have a Lachenal G/D , G is mid, D inner. G is an octave down from that on my C/G

 

Is the normal arrangemt for D/G like that or do some people have D mid and G inner? ie with mid row reeds sharpened to D scale?

 

G/D as you describe is the normal layout.

 

a friend of mine and i were actually thinking about D/G as being an interesting combination--C row tuned up a full step, and G left alone. i have never heard of it being done, but it may have been (i am no expert by any means). this is because it is traditional to have the inner row tuned up a fifth from the middle row. having the inner row a fourth up would mean you would have to relearn fingerings and all that, and would be unable to play any other concertinas. with a G/D, you can play a C/G no problem... it just transposes up.

 

the biggest problem with a D/G would be that you wouldnt have one of the largest benefits of a G/D: you can transpose the G/D back up a fifth to be in normal pitch (i play irish music), which means you get so many more chording possibilities, while playing the same notes as a C/G. this means you end up having to do a lot of "little finger" work on the right hand, but it's really fun. with a D/G, it would be basically the same as playing D tunes in C as they used to (back in the old days), but then the tunes would be pitched in D. this hardly gives you any more chording possibilities--it just makes it easier. so, from being easier... D/G makes a lot of sense, but being more fun, G/D is the way to go!

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I have something close to that, I just went in the opposite direction.

 

The D row is down a fourth from the G, rather than up a fifth.

This is similar to a melodeon, at least on the right hand.

 

Is this how Colin Dipper's "Franglo" is arranged? I've seen one but didn't have the chance to play it.

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