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Hardigg Storm Case


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I bought a Hardigg Storm Case, Model iM2075, to provide a higher level of protection for one of my concertinas. Now I'm not sure how to set it up.

 

I was expecting I could configure the foam to provide a "nest" to rest the concertina in, and perhaps use a velcro strap around the instrument to keep the bellows compressed. But due to the case's taper, there's not enough room fore-and-aft to maintain a layer of foam.

 

Also, if I leave the foam that's in the lid in place, and also keep the bottom foam pad in place, I can latch the case shut and the instrument will not budge -- but I'm wondering if that might be putting excessive pressure on the instrument (which is standard side - 6-1/4 inches across the flats).

 

If you have one of these cases, have you devised a way to provide traditional blocking in the corners? What did you use?

 

Any other advice on configuring one of these cases would be appreciated!

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Michael please careful with the foam. I have had a few cases of this type( foam inside) cause problems. There can be a breakdown of the foam when in contact with some materials. Wood with varnish, plastics, and even metals can cause the foam to partially liquify. I have seen the Pelican branded cases go almost liquid over time with concert flutes. That may be more from oils used in the bore, but my fear is that foam is just not a good idea on a valuable instrument. Try to line the opening you make with a fabric of some type to prevent this from harming a concertina.

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Michael please careful with the foam. I have had a few cases of this type( foam inside) cause problems. There can be a breakdown of the foam when in contact with some materials. Wood with varnish, plastics, and even metals can cause the foam to partially liquify. I have seen the Pelican branded cases go almost liquid over time with concert flutes. That may be more from oils used in the bore, but my fear is that foam is just not a good idea on a valuable instrument. Try to line the opening you make with a fabric of some type to prevent this from harming a concertina.

 

Stick on wool felt lining is available at most craft shops.....look for one w/ barrier film...

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Hi

Have a look at thomas concertinas website he uses the same case - look at the way he does it- might give you some ideas. If you use foam (I did) covering the foam in something like Tee shirt material (jersey type of fabric) seems to work ok

chris

 

 

edited to add- It's probably not much use to you (being in usa) but swanflight make custom flight cases which, give pretty good protection. The only drawback is that swanflight are in the UK

Edited by chris
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I did one of these yesterday. I find around 20mm of foam top and bottom covered with a stought non-shedding material will do for the vertical. There is not much room fore and aft but if you want more, lift the concertina up the taper a little by putting more foam under and less above the concertina. I cover a small piece of cardboard with cloth and use it on the front and back. If the foam pad has the right degree of snug the concertina will nto move forward and backward. For the corner blocks I cut pieces of wood (about 25mm square x about 125mm, this is a guess as I haven't one here) which I cover with leather and glue (contact glue) into the case. You need to make a nick in them where there is a ridge running around the case close to the bottom so they get good contact, and a rounded top edge helps with putting the concertina in. The case rounds towards the corner so I stay away from that area with the blocks. I put the instrument slightly towards one side as it leaves room for a small recorder etc.

 

Using the foam that comes with the case does put a lot of pressure on the concertina, too much in my opinion. Also, the pads I have top and bottom are not edge to edge in the case, just a pad about the size of the footprint of the concertina.

 

The shoulder strap is a great asset, buy it from Hardigg. Be careful to use the exact drill size they recommend.

 

Hope this helps

 

Chris

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Hi

computer mouse mats are a good source of thin but fairly dense foam

chris

 

 

Thanks for the tip - just what I wanted - I've a few old mats lying around somewhere

I would guess for a thicker layer, an old carrymat (camping mat) might be useful.

 

Chris

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Thanks everyone for your suggestions, and especially to Chris Ghent for the experience-based tips.

 

When I concertinafied my own hardigg case (after seeing Jeff Thomas'), I used cardboard, foam-board, and 4 wooden blocks, all covered in velvet. In retrospect, the whole thing ended up being overkill, and a bit more snug than is necessary, but I don't think it'll cause any problems.

 

I'll post pictures if I get a chance.

 

In contrast, I think Jeff just used two pieces of cardboard covered in velvet for the two ends.

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One alteration to what I said yesterday, I use around 1 1/4" (30mm) total foam thickness for top and bottom with a 6 1/8" (154mm) instrument, do your own calculations. The foam is not the softest sort, more like the stuff that comes in the case.

 

About four years ago I put one in a Pelican case, very similar but slightly smaller and lighter and without the flanges of the Hardigg. The Pelican will just take 6 1/8" but with little room for padding and as long as there is no strap screw on top. It was all a little snug for me. It wold be fine for a 6". I like the smaller and lighter bit but the clasps are also hard to operate on Pelicans. I have been using equipment cases like these for decades in another life, the Hardigg is fantastic quality and not expensive compared with the true price of a traditional box, which I would put at around 3 times the money.

 

I accept the reservations about the archive quality of foam or lack of it, but there is nothing wrong with a bit of maintenance every 30 years ie. replacing the foam. I would not leave the instrument in foam without the foam being covered.

 

Chris

post-74-1249197974_thumb.jpg

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