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Band names


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Incidentally, Co Durham is well supplied with peculiar names: such as Pity Me, Cooperative Villas, and there really is a hamlet called "No Place"

I think that:

 

"Six Mile Bottom" - Suffolk

"Pratts Bottom" - Kent

 

take some beating. Great band names? :unsure:

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I've always wanted to name a bluegrass group "Jed Zepplin."

For that you should learn to play the
Jedcertina
.
:huh:

What the heck? :blink:

If that was a response to my quip, just Search for "Jedcertina" in these Forums. You'll probably soon know more than you wished. ;)

 

Ah...thank you for the exegesis. (another great band name :rolleyes: )

 

I've had no such problems as seems ubquitous among the board here in devising names for groups that I've played in. The process usually begins with, "okay, the gig is next week...we need a name." Then, it's a process of free association. It helps if the players are a little weird :unsure: . If needing assistance, caffeine, sugar, alcohol, psychotropic drugs, and a general disdain for humanity all seem to help.

 

I've had MUCH more difficulty with pet names; my wife doesn't share my affinity for...whatever it is (she is not a musician <_< )

Edited by catty
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We had an English Ceilidh band based in Worcestershire, so we found a list of old cider apple varieties, and chose 'Harry Master's Jersey'.

 

A later incarnation, still led by my wife Ann, was called 'Ragtime Annie', but Ann got used to it after a while!

 

Nick

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My first band was called "Empty Pocket String Band" as money from our gigs was are only source of income .

My favorite band name was for a Klezmer band I played in= " The New Shtetl Ramblers" in homage to the New Lost City Ramblers. Alternative klezmer band names were: " The Garment District Kapelye" ( cultural references to both New York City and Utah), and " Two Jews, One Goy, and a Gurl"

My current Old time band is called " Public Domain String Band" as at the time when we were first performing in restaurants, the owners were getting hassled by ASCAP.

My current contra dance band is called "Loose Shoes"

 

I think that coming up with band names is great fun--but takes time as it typically takes inspiration> that veritable "AH HA!!" moment.

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My favorite band name was for a Klezmer band I played in= " The New Shtetl Ramblers" in homage to the New Lost City Ramblers. Alternative klezmer band names were: " The Garment District Kapelye" ( cultural references to both New York City and Utah), and " Two Jews, One Goy, and a Gurl"

My favorite klezmer band name (I wasn't a part of it) was a play on the classic "Klezmorim" while perfectly describing its members: Klezgoyim.

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I've always wanted to name a bluegrass group "Jed Zepplin." Maybe later..

 

 

that's a great name, if you do be sure to get a Jug player.

 

My current band is "Long Tall Guinness", we are Barley Juice tribute band (I play the economical low-brow mandolin...)

 

However I still like the idea of a Celtic/Irish Rolling Stones cover band "The Blarney Stones".

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I was for many years in Hefts and Blades band Sheffield , we had a well known ceilidh club for years.( cutlery allusion, heft is handle ) Not many got what it meant even many Sheffielders although it is only the local dialect pronunciation of haft. Moorland sheep are said to be 'hefted' to the place they were born

 

 

Anyway- I always fancied forming a band called 'Bleak Joe Cove' from a place in Annie Proulx's 'The Shipping News' As well as a seaside place , cove is an archaeic word for a bloke or chap in England eg 'a rum cove'

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I was for many years in Hefts and Blades band Sheffield , we had a well known ceilidh club for years.( cutlery allusion, heft is handle ) Not many got what it meant even many Sheffielders although it is only the local dialect pronunciation of haft. Moorland sheep are said to be 'hefted' to the place they were born

Mike,

I wondered why you supplied a translation for "heft" - and then I realised that I understood you because I'm half German by now! :lol: "Heft" is also German for the handle of a cutting implement.

 

Ah, well, back to my Anglo-German concertina ... isn't the Global Village a wonderfull place to live!

 

Cheers,

John

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I was for many years in Hefts and Blades band Sheffield , we had a well known ceilidh club for years.( cutlery allusion, heft is handle ) Not many got what it meant even many Sheffielders although it is only the local dialect pronunciation of haft. Moorland sheep are said to be 'hefted' to the place they were born

Mike,

I wondered why you supplied a translation for "heft" - and then I realised that I understood you because I'm half German by now! :lol: "Heft" is also German for the handle of a cutting implement.

 

Ah, well, back to my Anglo-German concertina ... isn't the Global Village a wonderfull place to live!

 

Cheers,

John

 

 

Thanks John what's the derivation , id it strong as in hefty, or is to hold? Just wondered

 

Cheers

Mike

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Thanks John what's the derivation , id it strong as in hefty, or is to hold? Just wondered

 

Cheers

Mike

 

According to my etymological dictionary of German. Heft, or hefti in Old High German, is a noun derived from the verb root heben, or OHG heven, heffan, Gothic hafjan, in its sense of 'take hold of' or 'grab'.

 

Ian

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Thanks John what's the derivation , id it strong as in hefty, or is to hold? Just wondered

 

Cheers

Mike

 

According to my etymological dictionary of German. Heft, or hefti in Old High German, is a noun derived from the verb root heben, or OHG heven, heffan, Gothic hafjan, in its sense of 'take hold of' or 'grab'.

 

Ian

 

Thanks, Ian,

I couldn't have put it better myself! ;)

(BTW, "heben" in modern German means "to lift", i.e. more akin to Engl. "heave", but in the Swabian dialect of my area, it means "to hold".)

 

The north-east English dialects show a strong Scandinavian, i.e. Germanic influence, so it's quite pobable that both Eng. "heft" and Ger. "Heft" have the same origin.

 

I looked up "hefty" (=strong) in Websters, but they give no derivation for it. Probably just a variant of "heavy".

 

Cheers,

John

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