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Past dealers - Stamford Music Shop (UK)


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Idle curiosity here.

 

When I first got interested in concertinas back in the mid 1970s the first port of call in those pre-internet days was "Exchange & Mart."

Hobgoblin were still quite new then, probably still on their first catalogue.

 

The other main concertina advertiser was Stamford Music Shop in Lincolnshire. As I recall (having sent off my SAE) they would send a price list of second-hand concertinas plus a "duplicated" leaflet giving basic concertina information.

 

The shop is still there as a general music shop and sheet music specialist but no longer concertina dealers. I emailed them but the manager with the concertina interest left a long time ago.

 

I'd just be interested to hear if anyone remembers them as concertina specialists, and bought or sold instruments from them etc.

Tom

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The other main concertina advertiser was Stamford Music Shop in Lincolnshire. As I recall (having sent off my SAE) they would send a price list of second-hand concertinas plus a "duplicated" leaflet giving basic concertina information.

 

The shop is still there as a general music shop and sheet music specialist but no longer concertina dealers. I emailed them but the manager with the concertina interest left a long time ago.

 

I'd just be interested to hear if anyone remembers them as concertina specialists, and bought or sold instruments from them etc.

Tom,

 

I never had dealings with Stamford Music Shop directly, but I had plenty with Phil Inglis, who lived nearby at Islip, and it was for he that they sold concertinas.

 

Funny thing was, I didn't know at the time that the Fens/Huntingdonshire area, and especially Nassington/Elton, was where the family of my father (a Londoner) originated - I'd have done some exploring if I had.

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Idle curiosity here.

 

When I first got interested in concertinas back in the mid 1970s the first port of call in those pre-internet days was "Exchange & Mart."

Hobgoblin were still quite new then, probably still on their first catalogue.

 

The other main concertina advertiser was Stamford Music Shop in Lincolnshire. As I recall (having sent off my SAE) they would send a price list of second-hand concertinas plus a "duplicated" leaflet giving basic concertina information.

 

The shop is still there as a general music shop and sheet music specialist but no longer concertina dealers. I emailed them but the manager with the concertina interest left a long time ago.

 

I'd just be interested to hear if anyone remembers them as concertina specialists, and bought or sold instruments from them etc.

Tom

 

Yes, I remember the Stamford Music Shop, as in the seventies I lived in the next county, Norfolk. They were always very helpful, happy to give free advice, even on one occasion advising me how best to renovate my concertina case.

 

They also gave out a very useful two-sided leaflet, with drawings and descriptions of the different types and models of concertinas. It was this descriptive leaflet that set me off collecting concertina literature, before the days of the web. Sample price lists I have of that period show a "Whatstone Aeolo 56 key tenor-treble, raised metal ends, Metal Buttons, Steel Reeds, Modern Pitch, 8-sided, with case £400." Why on earth didn't I buy it?!

 

Late 1981 they appear to have morphoed into Oundle Music, Nr. Peterborough. Of whom, sadly, I no nothing further.

 

Stamford was a great inspiring, enthusiastic shop to deal with.

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They also gave out a very useful two-sided leaflet, with drawings and descriptions of the different types and models of concertinas. It was this descriptive leaflet that set me off collecting concertina literature, before the days of the web.

 

Do you have a copy of the leaflet, lesfix? It would be fun (and quite nostalgic!) to see an image of it!

Tom

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They also gave out a very useful two-sided leaflet, with drawings and descriptions of the different types and models of concertinas. It was this descriptive leaflet that set me off collecting concertina literature, before the days of the web.

 

Do you have a copy of the leaflet, lesfix? It would be fun (and quite nostalgic!) to see an image of it!

Tom

 

 

I think I may have an old leaflet tucked away somewhere - if lesfix cannot help. Chas

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They also gave out a very useful two-sided leaflet, with drawings and descriptions of the different types and models of concertinas. It was this descriptive leaflet that set me off collecting concertina literature, before the days of the web.

 

Do you have a copy of the leaflet, lesfix? It would be fun (and quite nostalgic!) to see an image of it!

Tom

 

 

Hi.

Unfortunately I don't have the resources at present to transfer an image to the web. But if you e-mail me at squeezy@easy.com I will quite happily send you photocopies.

 

Regards

Lesfix

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They also gave out a very useful two-sided leaflet, with drawings and descriptions of the different types and models of concertinas. It was this descriptive leaflet that set me off collecting concertina literature, before the days of the web.

 

Do you have a copy of the leaflet, lesfix? It would be fun (and quite nostalgic!) to see an image of it!

Tom

 

 

Hi.

Unfortunately I don't have the resources at present to transfer an image to the web. But if you e-mail me at squeezy@easy.com I will quite happily send you photocopies.

 

Regards

Lesfix

 

Returning to the original posting...yes...I remember travelling 80 miles up the A1 to Stamford Music Shop in 1979, having seen their advertisements and with a longing to lay my hands on a decent, affordable Anglo. I received a friendly reception and was able to try out quite a few from amongst a considerable selection of 'antique' instruments. Very shortly thereafter I decided to place an order for one of John Timpany's brand new Shire 36 button C/G Anglos and was delighted with the outcome. Within a few weeks, after a couple of visits to view progress, I had all the excitement of collecting it. £220. One of the best things I ever did ! A treasured possession. (the bug had bitten me and I was too impatient to wait for one of Geoff and Neville's Crabbs).

 

Rod

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yes ,I had ONE dealing with phil Inglis.

I had lots of dealings with Phil, often meeting at auctions in central London, or going to his house, Islip Mill. We used to spend so much time talking about/describing concertinas on the phone that my girlfriend started calling him "square buttons" (I guess we did seem pretty obsessive! :rolleyes: ), but I haven't seen or heard from him in a long time now. :(

Edited by Stephen Chambers
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They also gave out a very useful two-sided leaflet, with drawings and descriptions of the different types and models of concertinas. It was this descriptive leaflet that set me off collecting concertina literature, before the days of the web.

 

Do you have a copy of the leaflet, lesfix? It would be fun (and quite nostalgic!) to see an image of it!

Tom

 

 

I think I may have an old leaflet tucked away somewhere - if lesfix cannot help. Chas

 

Hi Tom - I have emailed you some scans of old leaflets from both Stamford Music Shop and Oundle Music, but I thought I would post a note here just in case anyone else might be interested. Chas

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typical dealer,they all love making deals,and paying as little as they can,

he was quite pleasant,and had a very nice home,lived near or close or to a mill.

dealers have to be a certain type,to be successful.

In fairness to Stephen Chambers he found me two very good concertinas,which he did not make a lot on,and I would say that he[stephen] has a genuine love of the instruments,whereas Phil Inglis must have either died,or lost interest in dealing,or lost interest in concertinas,he didnt strike me as being as genuine as Stephen,but it is hard to judge on just one meeting.

Dick,

 

Like you said, "it is hard to judge on just one meeting", but don't you think you're being very unkind to Phil Inglis based on just that?

 

Perhaps you missed my comment (above) about how "I had lots of dealings with Phil, often meeting at auctions in central London, or going to his house, Islip Mill. We used to spend so much time talking about/describing concertinas on the phone that my girlfriend started calling him "square buttons" (I guess we did seem pretty obsessive! :rolleyes: ) ...", or maybe you're not aware of the pioneering articles he wrote about the duet concertina (his particular passion) in the Australian Concertina Magazine, 12, 13, & 14 (1985)? The latter are now considered significant enough to be made available online at Concertina.com; The History of the Duet Concertina I, II & III.

 

He was a real enthusiast for the concertina, but I believe he gave up dealing in them because (especially after his divorce) it was costing him too much and he couldn't afford to susidise it any more - you should bear in mind that it costs a lot to track down and purchase antique instruments in the first place, and then your money is tied up in them while they're undergoing expensive repairs (which can take years!) before you can ever sell them again, and then (in Phil's case) you have to market them through a retail shop that takes its "cut" when it sells one for you... :(

 

I'm reminded of a thread on Melodeon.net at the moment, about Why on Earth did Oakwood stop making boxes?, and in particular a "luthier joke" that somebody posted, which applies equally to concertina restorers/dealers:

 

Did you hear about the instrument maker that won millions of pounds on the British lottery? When asked what he planned to do with his new found wealth, he said, "I guess I'll just keep making instruments 'til it runs out".
:huh:

By the way, I remember not even charging you "expenses" on at least one of the Æolas that I got for you - the one I bought in Central London and immediately brought to your subterranean busking spot at Marble Arch...

Edited by Stephen Chambers
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