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What do you call someone who plays a concertina


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oooh...I like the dress....I'll have to find one like that now....recreate the picture for my avatar ;)

 

Hey LDT, don't forget that she was wearing of pair of THESE when that photo was taken! :P

I didn't realise you were that old that you were there when the photo was taken? ;) :P

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oooh...I like the dress....I'll have to find one like that now....recreate the picture for my avatar ;)

I dread to think what Greenpeace would have to say about the baleen (whalebone) in the matching undies ... ;)

 

Speaking of which: concertinas don't have any parts made of bits of endangered species of plant or animal, do they?

Are the "bone" buttons on older concertinas really bone, or is that a politically correct euphemism for ivory?

 

Cheers,

John

 

Actually baleen (which is actually the part that acts as a sieve in the whale's mouth) is available LEGALLY through the Inuit that hunt them traditionally. I've heard. Apparently it's not even that expensive. :huh:

 

I don't know about concertina buttons, but I did hear once (I think) that for harpsichord keys (earlier 18th century) bone was preferred over ivory. I can't remember why, though. :unsure:

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In my case ... Aeolaist

 

Miss Eva Taylor - ÆOLIST:

 

EvaTaylor.jpg

Well, Stephen, Miss Taylor certainly looks stunning, posing beside her tenor-treble or extended-treble Aeola (would we say that about a man, I wonder?). Do you know anything about her?

Chris,

 

I did a little research on her a few years ago, though I didn't find out much. I mentioned her in the Salvation Army Concertina Bands thread too, when I posted the photo of her namesake Eva Booth and commented that that was "certainly not the usual stiffly formal portrait that you would usually see in Victorian photographs of British Salvationists, though the pose is reminiscent of a contemporary photograph that I have of the equally lovely "Aeolist" Eva Taylor (also the daughter of a minister, and probably deriving their common Christian name from the same source [Little Eva of 'Uncle Tom's Cabin'])" and that "I must scan the three post cards that I have of her [Eva Taylor], so that the English concertina players can have their own pin-up!"

 

The photos seem to date from about 1906 - seeing that mine is inscribed on the back From Arthur, Nov 14th 1906 and (seemingly) another copy was recently sold on eBay signed With kindest regards from your old pupil Eva Taylor. July 16th / 06. The seller of the latter stated that "Miss Taylor was a concertina player who performed in theatre and music hall" and that that post card was "From the collection of James Howarth, conductor of the Empire Theatre, Edinburgh."

 

She gets a mention in the old Wheatstone catalogues too.

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"I must scan the three post cards that I have of her [Eva Taylor], so that the English concertina players can have their own pin-up!"

That's a great idea.

OK, here's another one:

 

EvaTaylor22.jpg

 

So you see, LDT, her dress is a (wee) bit longer (and flouncier) than the one you were considering, and the waist might need taking in too - if you want to be authentic that is. (Actually, it seems her photo was probably taken pretty much at the height of the wasp-waist fashion - after 1907 it became less acute and corsets became straighter.)

 

Apart from that, you'd need shoes with buckles, and a big black bow for your hair and (to be really authentic) it looks like you'd have to paint the corsage in later. :rolleyes:

Edited by Stephen Chambers
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In my case ... Aeolaist

 

Miss Eva Taylor - ÆOLIST:

 

EvaTaylor.jpg

Well, Stephen, Miss Taylor certainly looks stunning, posing beside her tenor-treble or extended-treble Aeola (would we say that about a man, I wonder?). Do you know anything about her?

Chris,

 

I did a little research on her a few years ago, though I didn't find out much. I mentioned her in the Salvation Army Concertina Bands thread too, when I posted the photo of her namesake Eva Booth and commented that that was "certainly not the usual stiffly formal portrait that you would usually see in Victorian photographs of British Salvationists, though the pose is reminiscent of a contemporary photograph that I have of the equally lovely "Aeolist" Eva Taylor (also the daughter of a minister, and probably deriving their common Christian name from the same source [Little Eva of 'Uncle Tom's Cabin'])" and that "I must scan the three post cards that I have of her [Eva Taylor], so that the English concertina players can have their own pin-up!"

 

The photos seem to date from about 1906 - seeing that mine is inscribed on the back From Arthur, Nov 14th 1906 and (seemingly) another copy was recently sold on eBay signed With kindest regards from your old pupil Eva Taylor. July 16th / 06. The seller of the latter stated that "Miss Taylor was a concertina player who performed in theatre and music hall" and that that post card was "From the collection of James Howarth, conductor of the Empire Theatre, Edinburgh."

 

She gets a mention in the old Wheatstone catalogues too.

 

Thank you Stephen :)

 

Chris

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Who owns this old photograph?

I do, but it's only an old post card, with poor definition.

 

I wonder if it could be magnified, to learn what number it is? ;)

I'm afraid this is as good as it gets...

 

EvaTaylorsbox.jpg

 

...before it starts turning into:

 

EvaTaylorsbox2.jpg

 

Where is that Concertina now? :)

Hopefully somebody still has it.

 

I used to have a very similar 56-key treble myself, bought "one owner from new" in Brixton, S. London, but that one was from 1910, so maybe 4 or 5 years later than hers (I'd say it was pretty new when the photo was taken).

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...years later than hers (I'd say it was pretty new when the photo was taken).

 

Wouldn't the finger rest still be leather covered if it was new(ish)? Were some supplied uncovered? I had this idea they all started covered and it was only the really 'hard' players who destroyed the leather then just rubbed the sharp edges off the screw heads with their little fingers...

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...years later than hers (I'd say it was pretty new when the photo was taken).

Wouldn't the finger rest still be leather covered if it was new(ish)? Were some supplied uncovered? I had this idea they all started covered and it was only the really 'hard' players who destroyed the leather then just rubbed the sharp edges off the screw heads with their little fingers...

No, only inexpensive models came with their rough, "unfinished" brass finger rests covered in leather. Higher grades came with "finished" nickel-silver rests (sometimes even silver, or gold-plated ones), and screws with half-rounded heads.

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...years later than hers (I'd say it was pretty new when the photo was taken).

Wouldn't the finger rest still be leather covered if it was new(ish)? Were some supplied uncovered? I had this idea they all started covered and it was only the really 'hard' players who destroyed the leather then just rubbed the sharp edges off the screw heads with their little fingers...

No, only inexpensive models came with their rough, "unfinished" brass finger rests covered in leather. Higher grades came with "finished" nickel-silver rests (sometimes even silver, or gold-plated ones), and screws with half-rounded heads.

Aha!

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However, despite Stephen's evidence (and a lovely picture that is) that an Aeola player is an Aeolist (which sounds quite graceful and tasteful) ... I'm not sure that the word "Edeophonist" quite grabs me [grin] ... you have to admit that it is a bit of a mouthful not to mention the difficulty of pronunciation (too close to Idiot for my liking) !

Ah, but you would be playing it for our Edeophication, no?

(By the way, it's properly Æolist, not Aeolist... says the man whose Danish keyboard makes it easy to get it "right". :D)

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Is it a concertinarist? Concertinarina?

If you play a concertina are you concertinaring?

These are important questions....and answers? ;) :P

it could depend on where you live.

in Sweden,you might be called a battering ram

Eh? No names like that when I played at the Bryngelhögen midsummer celebration last Friday, even though I was with my sheep-farming friend.

 

I think I must be missing a joke. :unsure:

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