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Fiddlehead Fern

Concertina on a ship

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Hello all, this summer I'm going to be spending a month on a square rigged sailing ship on the great lakes. Quite looking forward to it too, as you might guess. Well, I'm planning on taking the 'tina, since a month without making music (besides singing) is just too frightening to contemplate, and it's small and hopefully won't be affected as much as my violin would be. Though if I can pack my things very carefully my second fiddle may well make the trip too. That's to be decided yet.

Anyone have any advice on what I should do (besides "don't take it swimming") whilst sailing along with the concertina? Dry and secure place, check, instruments allowed, check, and yes, I'm careful (to the point of being annoying to some non-instrumental friends) about making sure the heat, humidity et all is reasonably level and safe as possible in the circumstances before subjecting my "little pals" to it. It's freshwater sailing, I'll be in the great lakes and St. Lawrence seaway up to Montreal.

 

Then comes my second question....what should I do and see (if I'm able) in Montreal? Music to hear? Landmarks to take cheesy tourist pictures in front of? I don't know how much time I'll have ashore, nor how far I'll be able to go (walking...) nor even exactly where I'll be. But, if anyone has recommendations I'll keep them in mind.

I do know that the ship I'm going to be on was invited up as part of a festival, but I haven't been told what that festival is and I'm not entirely sure what the dates are, I haven't looked at the schedule for a bit.

 

So that's all. Ways to keep the 'tina from getting too seasick, and what to see in Montreal. Fair sailing!

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I once took a concertina on a boat, the only concern was how to keep it dry, and that wasn't too difficult. If it is a real risk that it might become wet, I would not take my best instrument but a cheaper one for outdoors.

Edited by marien

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Big ships like the square riggers tend to be pretty dry, it's the smaller craft that tend to get damp below.

 

If you are worried for your instruments welfare I'd recommend that you go online and look up waterproof 'stuff sacks' available from yacht chandlers.

These are waterproof (obviously) and have a really good seal. you should find one to fit over your fiddle case, and a smaller one for the 'tina.

 

Have a great time,

 

I'm sooooooo jealous !

 

 

rob

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Hello all, this summer I'm going to be spending a month on a square rigged sailing ship on the great lakes.

 

Hi, Fern,

Envy here, too!

 

You don't need salt water under your keel to enjoy the concertina. You don't even need an expanse of water all round you. I once had a lovely week on the canals between Chirk (north Wales) and Chester (northwest England) and back. We were in a hired motor narrow boat, and I was the more or less the skipper, but when the "first mate" was at the tiller, I would sit in the for'ard well and play my 'tina, getting cheery waves from people on passing boats, and watch the countryside roll by.

 

Another good thing about canals: they have lots of pubs beside them, and sometimes you have the luck to moor for the night close to one that has a session going! On an earlier canal trip, we had a session at the Cape of Good Hope. (No South African boerenmuziek - there's a canal-side pub of that name in Warwick :lol: ).

 

Have fun,

Cheers,

John

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Just Ontairo, or are going to get on the other Lakes as well?

 

Alan

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Re: Waterproof bags: That's a good idea, though I'm more concerned for the overall effect of humidity than, say, dropping it overboard. In the material they gave us to read it mentioned that there was a special dry place to store instruments if someone brought one.

I mostly just meant things that I wouldn't expect, a rather bad example from the fiddle, one time while playing in the rain (under a canvas fly, in a deluge) all 6 of us fiddlers who were shooting the breeze noticed that, besides the expected tuning issues our bow hairs were all going slack and we'd have to tighten them after every set. I was looking for less obvious things that might happen with free reed instruments exposed to conditions that I haven't seen them in before, basically.

 

Re: Great Lakes: I'm sailing on the brig Niagara, who's home port is in Erie, PA, so yes, I'll be in Lake Erie as well as Ontario. We'll also be stopping in Oswego, NY, so if there's anything I should see there let me know too! :P

 

And John; I know I can enjoy the concertina anywhere but I love square riggers anyway, and I figured I might as well bring the concertina and further the "sailors always play the little round accordion" stereotype, right? :ph34r:

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And John; I know I can enjoy the concertina anywhere but I love square riggers anyway, and I figured I might as well bring the concertina and further the "sailors always play the little round accordion" stereotype, right? :ph34r:

 

Fern,

 

That's the spirit! I've never refrained from doing something I like just because it's stereotype! As long as you do individualistic things as well, which I'm sure you do. :rolleyes:

 

Cheers,

John

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Yeah, well not many other kids my age I know play the concertina. Or are interested in sailing tall ships, for that matter. So maybe I'm being individual while furthering a stereotype? Hmm, how does that work?! (I'm drawing the line at the eyepatch and wooden leg, however.)

Well if that doesn't qualify I think I'm sufficiently weird in other ways so I won't worry too much about it. :lol:

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Yeah, well not many other kids my age I know play the concertina. Or are interested in sailing tall ships, for that matter. So maybe I'm being individual while furthering a stereotype? Hmm, how does that work?! (I'm drawing the line at the eyepatch and wooden leg, however.)

Well if that doesn't qualify I think I'm sufficiently weird in other ways so I won't worry too much about it. :lol:

 

 

sounds like quite the adventure.

 

what I'm thinking is: one month in an enclosed enviornment with other passengers, I haven't been on too many square rigged vessels, but I imagine the accomdations are somewhat cramped.

 

Your biggest fear may not be getting your concertina soaked, but watching it sail over the horizon as your bunk mates reach thier "Concertina Limit".

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Then comes my second question....what should I do and see (if I'm able) in Montreal? Music to hear?

 

You are in for a wonderful experience. I hope you get a chance to get off the ship in Montreal. My wife is an ex-Montrealer, and it is my favorite Canadian city. Very walkable, and a very cool and European feeling waterfront and downtown. There is a very good session on Saturdays at 3:00 p.m. at Hurley's Pub. Irish music of course, but some good Quebec and Maritime music last time I was there.

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Yeah, well not many other kids my age I know play the concertina. Or are interested in sailing tall ships, for that matter. So maybe I'm being individual while furthering a stereotype? Hmm, how does that work?! (I'm drawing the line at the eyepatch and wooden leg, however.)

Well if that doesn't qualify I think I'm sufficiently weird in other ways so I won't worry too much about it. :lol:

 

 

sounds like quite the adventure.

 

what I'm thinking is: one month in an enclosed enviornment with other passengers, I haven't been on too many square rigged vessels, but I imagine the accomdations are somewhat cramped.

 

Your biggest fear may not be getting your concertina soaked, but watching it sail over the horizon as your bunk mates reach thier "Concertina Limit".

Yes, I've thought about that, close quarters and as they say "you trust your life to the knots your shipmates tie" or something along those lines...I'm hoping to not annoy anyone and keep my fingers in working order. Hopefully there will be others bringing musical instruments too so I at least have a chance of not being the only annoying one. But I don't think I snore, so maybe they'll cut me some slack! :unsure: :ph34r:

 

Then comes my second question....what should I do and see (if I'm able) in Montreal? Music to hear?

 

You are in for a wonderful experience. I hope you get a chance to get off the ship in Montreal. My wife is an ex-Montrealer, and it is my favorite Canadian city. Very walkable, and a very cool and European feeling waterfront and downtown. There is a very good session on Saturdays at 3:00 p.m. at Hurley's Pub. Irish music of course, but some good Quebec and Maritime music last time I was there.

Hurley's. I'll remember that. Hopefully I'd be allowed in (minor and all), but if it's during the day that would be good to, since I'm not allowed out late while standing watches, etc. Thanks!

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Go for it. I only wish it was me.

 

You have the advantage of fresh water - no salt air to get into the reeds, but even so, my Kookaburra didn't suffer any ill effects from a trip to Antarctica on the barque Europa.

I didn't make any special preparations for the concer, and just kept it on a spare bunk in our cabin (but where it couldn't POSSIBLY fall - even in a force 9). We had some good sessions in the saloon with other passengers and crew.

 

IMG_2341.jpg

The first Kookaburra in antarctica.

(The Kooka has real concertina reeds, not accordian reeds)

 

Have a great trip!!

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Greetings everyone!

 

I've been having a blast this month, sailing and learning so much, with some great jam sessions in the evening with some of my shipmates. I did bring both concertina and fiddle, and I'm glad I did.

There are several guitar players on board, a few quite good, who I've had the pleasure of playing with when we get time off. One of them picked up a mandolin in Montreal as well, and another got his banjo when his parents came to visit us here in Port Colborne, so I'm looking forward to a chance to hear him play that with the fiddle and/or concertina, since he plays a lot of great old-timey tunes that I know. Good times, good times. There's also an accordian player in my watch, but he doesn't have it with him, so we'll not talk about that..... :rolleyes:

 

Unfortunately I didn't get to see a great deal of Montreal, mostly just wandering around town within walking distance of the harbor, but it's a beautiful city and I hope to return someday, and get to Hurley's! Unfortunately I had to work all day when they had a session, andI never did get down that far, but alas.

 

It's been great though, when I get home I'll return to lurking on here, but I thought I'd let you all know I'd not completely fallen off the face of the planet, just nearly.

 

Fair winds and following seas to you all!

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...I thought I'd let you all know I'd not completely fallen off the face of the planet....

Better luck next time!
;)

Fair winds and following seas to you all!

And to you, mate. :)

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Please, PLEASE do a full report on your sailing adventure! It will be wonderful for all of us to share vicariously.

 

My only ship/concertina experience was many years ago, going through a Force Nine en route to Shetland on the now-departed SS Scillingar. I sat outside in the lee of the cabin, playing sea shanties on my EC, while, every so often, ashen-faced passengers would emerge from the doorway, lurch to the rail and spew their most recent meals. I never figured out whether it was the pitching and yawing of the ship, or just my lousy playing, that inspired their spectacular ejections - but I made sure I was well upwind! :o

Edited by yankeeclipper

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My only ship/concertina experience was many years ago, going through a Force Nine en route to Shetland on the now-departed SS Scillingar.

And just when was that?

 

In 1981 (I forget what month) I made a brief visit to Shetland. The way out was pleasant enough, and friend/hostess Jenny said that the time I was there was the only 3-day stretch she could recall that she hadn't been rained on.

 

But coming back we hit quite a storm, and the trip which was scheduled to take 6 hours took 16. Actually, it took 14, but then we had to wait 2 hours for the tide to come in, so that we wouldn't hit bottom in the troughs of the swells in Aberdeen harbor. Members of the crew were seasick. Noone was out on the open deck; it wasn't safe. I was sitting by the window in the dining room and looking as straight up as I could and seeing only a wall of water when we rolled to that side. I was later told that more than one fishing trawler was lost in that storm.

 

Of course I played a bit of music. What else was there to do?

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My only ship/concertina experience was many years ago, going through a Force Nine en route to Shetland on the now-departed SS Scillingar.

And just when was that?

As I recall, it was in the early summer of 1985. The Sillinger (unsure of spelling) was a small freight/passenger ship doing scheduled runs between Stromness, Orkney and Scalloway in Shetland for a year or two. The company folded due to excessive cost of needed repairs on the old ship. I believe the Sillinger was originally in service between mainland UK and the Scilly Isles. She was a bit long in the tooth by the time she saw the North Sea, and her hull was more paint than steel, but she actually handled the rough seas pretty well. :) Our northbound course carried us through the middle of a westbound Soviet navy fleet that was exercising its right of passage between Orkney and Shetland; a big carrier, some cruisers and lots of escorts. V-e-r-y impressive! :ph34r:

Edited by yankeeclipper

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Greetings everyone!

<snip>

Fair winds and following seas to you all!

 

Sounds like you had a great time..I'm very jelous.

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