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Free English Concertina Tutoring


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Now that I'm retired, I find I have lots of time to help tutor English Concertina players who want a few pointers on playing Scottish, Irish, English, and other instrumental pieces with tricky fingerings as well as song accompaniment. I've been an advanced player for over 30 years and have taught at both the Northeast Squeeze-In and Celtic College in Ontario. I've composed over 400 pieces for English Concertina and am currently busy creating English Concertina arrangements for traditional folksongs.

 

We have a lovely 40 acre Nature Preserve just west of Ann Arbor, Michigan and can put one or two people up at a time for a few days of intensive concertina technique, songs, and general fol-der-ol. We make our own British ales, artisan breads, and lots of ethnic cookery. You may camp on the property if you prefer, or use the guest room.

 

I can even give your instrument a looking over while you're here, and give repair and tuning advise. There is no charge for any of this, but you're always welcome to pitch in on meal costs. A few of you have already joined us and had a great time. Aug-April is best, because of our busy land maintenance schedule in Spring and early Summer. Beginners and Advance players are equally welcome!

 

If interested, Contact Matt Heumann, Braeburn Cottage, 1028 Sylvan Rd, Chelsea, MI 48118 or

email: braeburnmusic1028@gmail.com

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That is a generous offer Matt. If only Michigan were a little nearer London or the pound had not gone to the dogs.

 

The idea of drinking decent beer in America is enticement enough. I shall avoid starting a war by quoting The CAMRA Guide to Beer I used to have. Suffice to say North America and Downunder did not fare well.

 

Ian

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The idea of drinking decent beer in America is enticement enough. I shall avoid starting a war by quoting The CAMRA Guide to Beer I used to have. Suffice to say North America and Downunder did not fare well.

When was it published?

For that matter, how did they do their research?

 

There are quite a few excellent brews in the US, but they're neither mass produced nor mass marketed. They're mainly from "micro"-breweries and brew-pubs, and lilttle-known outside their home towns.

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The idea of drinking decent beer in America is enticement enough. I shall avoid starting a war by quoting The CAMRA Guide to Beer I used to have. Suffice to say North America and Downunder did not fare well.

When was it published?

For that matter, how did they do their research?

 

There are quite a few excellent brews in the US, but they're neither mass produced nor mass marketed. They're mainly from "micro"-breweries and brew-pubs, and lilttle-known outside their home towns.

 

It must have been published back in the eighties and I am not sure how they researched it.

 

I have had great beers from micro-breweries in Vermont and Austin, Texas, the two places I go to most often in America. Downunder I was unable to find anything at all that was drinkable and no-one local I was with there could recommend anything either.

 

Ian

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Back to the original topic--I remember fondly Matt's workshop at NESI a couple of years ago. I've continued to play several of his tunes. His offer of tutoring on English concertina is very appealing. I'm only a few hundred miles away-- if I get some time I may take him up on it.

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hello Matt ,

 

it's great to see such an experienced player offering his help to this forum. When you keep an eye on the forum you'll notice there will be coming a lot of questions in your direction. I do have some in mind I want to ask in the near future when i find the time to post . Thanks beforehand

 

kind greetings

 

Dirk , Belgium

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That is a generous offer Matt. If only Michigan were a little nearer London or the pound had not gone to the dogs.

 

The idea of drinking decent beer in America is enticement enough. I shall avoid starting a war by quoting The CAMRA Guide to Beer I used to have. Suffice to say North America and Downunder did not fare well.

 

Ian

 

Ian: I agree most people make bad beer, but I'm not as much a drinker as a cook, and I'm very fussy about taste---My British and Scottish friends and relatives say my REAL ALE is the REAL DEAL and its good enough for me. Enough said on the subject of beer! Hope some day you can make it over for some music!

---Matt

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